Janie Gets Married (1946)

89 or 91 mins | Comedy | 22 June 1946

Director:

Vincent Sherman

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

Carl Guthrie

Editor:

Christian Nyby

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film was a sequel to Warner Bros.' 1944 picture Janie . Although a "Janie" series had been planned, Warner Bros. abandoned the idea after actress Joyce Reynolds, who played "Janie" in the 1944 film, temporarily retired from films to join her husband, a U.S. Marine, in Quantico, VA, according to a Feb 1945 studio press release. A 2 Feb 1945 HR news item noted that director David Butler was replaced by Vincent Sherman after he was assigned to the Warner Bros. film The Time, the Place, the Girl . Actor Robert Benchley died in 1945. This was his final ... More Less

This film was a sequel to Warner Bros.' 1944 picture Janie . Although a "Janie" series had been planned, Warner Bros. abandoned the idea after actress Joyce Reynolds, who played "Janie" in the 1944 film, temporarily retired from films to join her husband, a U.S. Marine, in Quantico, VA, according to a Feb 1945 studio press release. A 2 Feb 1945 HR news item noted that director David Butler was replaced by Vincent Sherman after he was assigned to the Warner Bros. film The Time, the Place, the Girl . Actor Robert Benchley died in 1945. This was his final film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Jun 1946.
---
Daily Variety
4 Jun 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Jun 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Sep 45
p. 2655.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Jun 46
p. 3029.
New York Times
15 Jun 46
p. 24.
Variety
5 Jun 46
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created in the play Janie by Josephine Bentham and Herschel V. Williams, Jr., as produced by Brock Pemberton (New York, 10 Sep 1942).
SONGS
"G.I. Song," music and lyrics by M. K. Jerome and Ted Koehler.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 June 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 June 1946
Production Date:
29 March--mid June 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 June 1946
Copyright Number:
LP399
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89 or 91
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Soldier Dick Lawrence returns home to Hortonville and is welcomed at the station by his mother and stepfather, John and Thelma Van Brunt, and his girl friend, Janie Conway. A short time later, Dick and Janie become engaged. The day of the wedding, Van Brunt has a candid talk with Dick, during which he compares marriage to being in a boxcar with a wild horse. This so disturbs Dick that he insists on meeting immediately with Janie, who hands him a marriage contract, which is to be renewed monthly. Despite their ensuing quarrel, Dick and Janie are married. Unknown to Dick, Janie has persuaded her father to create a job for him on his newspaper, and the Van Brunts are paying half the rent on their house. As the first marriage contract option date approaches, Janie's younger, tomboy sister Elsbeth stops by the house on her way to school and threatens to tell Dick about Janie's machinations unless Janie gives her money to buy some new sports equipment. Later that day, Spud, a WAC who knew Dick during the war, surprises him at the office, and they go out for a drink at the Coral Room. Meanwhile, at home, Janie has problems with her maid, Mrs. Angles. When Scooper, her high school boyfriend, stops by with a story idea for Dick, Janie suggests they meet Dick and his "buddy." She is surprised to discover that Spud is an attractive woman and becomes jealous when Spud and Dick reminisce. Before Janie can object, Dick invites Spud to stay with them while she is in town. The next morning, Janie is ... +


Soldier Dick Lawrence returns home to Hortonville and is welcomed at the station by his mother and stepfather, John and Thelma Van Brunt, and his girl friend, Janie Conway. A short time later, Dick and Janie become engaged. The day of the wedding, Van Brunt has a candid talk with Dick, during which he compares marriage to being in a boxcar with a wild horse. This so disturbs Dick that he insists on meeting immediately with Janie, who hands him a marriage contract, which is to be renewed monthly. Despite their ensuing quarrel, Dick and Janie are married. Unknown to Dick, Janie has persuaded her father to create a job for him on his newspaper, and the Van Brunts are paying half the rent on their house. As the first marriage contract option date approaches, Janie's younger, tomboy sister Elsbeth stops by the house on her way to school and threatens to tell Dick about Janie's machinations unless Janie gives her money to buy some new sports equipment. Later that day, Spud, a WAC who knew Dick during the war, surprises him at the office, and they go out for a drink at the Coral Room. Meanwhile, at home, Janie has problems with her maid, Mrs. Angles. When Scooper, her high school boyfriend, stops by with a story idea for Dick, Janie suggests they meet Dick and his "buddy." She is surprised to discover that Spud is an attractive woman and becomes jealous when Spud and Dick reminisce. Before Janie can object, Dick invites Spud to stay with them while she is in town. The next morning, Janie is disturbed by the way Spud makes herself at home. She then must decide how to handle the fact that both her mother and Thelma have bought drapes for the house. When the Van Brunts stop by, Janie asks Van Brunt, who is her uncle as well as Dick's stepfather, what to do about Spud. Van Brunt advises her to show interest in another man and make Dick jealous. When Scooper telephones for Spud, in whom he is interested, Janie suggests that they both go by the paper, but there, she learns that Dick is out with Spud. She then tries to convince Scooper to take her dancing, but after giving her a big kiss for old times' sake, he refuses. The kiss is seen by Mr. Stowers, a prospective buyer of the newspaper and a firm believer in small town values, who immediately assumes that Scooper is Janie's husband. When Lucile suggests that Janie give a dinner party for Stowers, she is faced with two problems: She must somehow explain to Stowers why she was kissing a man to whom she is not married and must explain to her parents and in-laws why she has two sets of drapes. That night, Dick and Spud return very late, and Janie and Dick quarrel bitterly. Later, Spud explains to Janie that there is nothing romantic between them, and that they were working on a story idea. The next day, Dick learns that Janie has been meddling on his behalf and, determined to succeed on his own, quits his job. Then Janie's friend Bernadine asks Janie to put up her G.I. boyfriend Dead Pan for the night. Even though it is almost time for the dinner party to start, Dick has not arrived, but Stowers, on the other hand, is early. Then a drunken Dick arrives with Spud and four former Army buddies. Finally, after much confusion, a huge family fight breaks out. Dead Pan, the Army buddies and Stowers leave the house in disgust. Believing that she has botched the sale of the paper and threatened her marriage, Janie apologizes to Dick. Elsbeth returns with Stowers, however, and he agrees to buy the paper after all. He then reveals that he found Dick's story notes and offers him a job as the head of a department. When the rest of the family sits down to dinner, Elsbeth reveals to Dick and Janie that she told Stowers that they were expecting a baby and suggests that they do not make a liar out of her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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