Margie (1946)

95 mins | Comedy-drama | November 1946

Director:

Henry King

Writer:

F. Hugh Herbert

Producer:

Walter Morosco

Cinematographer:

Charles G. Clarke

Editor:

Barbara McLean

Production Designers:

James Basevi, J. Russell Spencer

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in Jan 1945 the studio paid $12,500 for a treatment, titled "Maggie" by Ruth McKenney and her husband Richard Bransten. McKenney's short stories "The Ultimate Catastrophe" and "Take the Marines Out of Nicaragua" had been included in a book, The McKenneys Carry On (New York, 1940) while "La Scandale Internationale" was included in My Sister Eileen (New York, 1938). In May of 1940, McKenney had sold the dramatization rights of My Sister Eileen to Joseph A. Fields and Jerome Chodorov, who subsequently sold the rights to their play to Columbia, the studio that produced the first film version in 1942. However, neither the play nor the film utilized material from the story, "La Scandale Internationale," so Twentieth Century-Fox was able to obtain a waiver of rights. Documents in the legal files imply that F. Hugh Herbert may have used elements from the screenplay by Gene Markey for Girls' Dormitory (1936), which was based on a play, Matura by Ladislas Fodor .
       According to a news item in HR , Cornel Wilde refused the male lead in Margie and was suspended by the studio. Richard Jaeckel was also announced for a starring role. It is unclear when, during the pre-production phase, "Maggie" became Margie . Shooting began with exterior scenes in Reno, Nevada and finished at the studio with the crane shots into and out of the attic which open and close the film. Although "Margie," written in 1920, is the only song credited on screen, the film ... More Less

According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in Jan 1945 the studio paid $12,500 for a treatment, titled "Maggie" by Ruth McKenney and her husband Richard Bransten. McKenney's short stories "The Ultimate Catastrophe" and "Take the Marines Out of Nicaragua" had been included in a book, The McKenneys Carry On (New York, 1940) while "La Scandale Internationale" was included in My Sister Eileen (New York, 1938). In May of 1940, McKenney had sold the dramatization rights of My Sister Eileen to Joseph A. Fields and Jerome Chodorov, who subsequently sold the rights to their play to Columbia, the studio that produced the first film version in 1942. However, neither the play nor the film utilized material from the story, "La Scandale Internationale," so Twentieth Century-Fox was able to obtain a waiver of rights. Documents in the legal files imply that F. Hugh Herbert may have used elements from the screenplay by Gene Markey for Girls' Dormitory (1936), which was based on a play, Matura by Ladislas Fodor .
       According to a news item in HR , Cornel Wilde refused the male lead in Margie and was suspended by the studio. Richard Jaeckel was also announced for a starring role. It is unclear when, during the pre-production phase, "Maggie" became Margie . Shooting began with exterior scenes in Reno, Nevada and finished at the studio with the crane shots into and out of the attic which open and close the film. Although "Margie," written in 1920, is the only song credited on screen, the film included passages from many other hits of the 1920s, among them "At Sundown," "Avalon," "I'll See You in My Dreams," "Collegiate," "Charmaine," "Three O'Clock in the Morning," "Charleston," "Diane," "Wonderful One" and "Ain't She Sweet?" Singer Rudy Vallee was paid $1,000 to re-record his popular song of the period, "My Time is Your Time." A Newsweek article on Jun 23, 1947 which reported that industry production costs had risen 66 2/3 % over a year cited Margie which cost $1,680,000 in 1946, and would cost $2,800,000 if made in 1947.
       Documents in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library reveal that Australian censors removed all references to "Margie" losing her bloomers at the ice rink and to their subsequent return. Alan Young made his feature film debut in Margie . A radio version of the film, featuring Jeanne Crain and Glenn Langan, was broadcast on the Lux Radio Theatre on 8 Sep 1947. The same program did another version, this time with Crain and Hugh Marlowe, which was broadcast on 22 Oct 1951. Hedda Hopper's program, This is Hollywood also presented an adaptation on 28 Jun 1947. A television series based on the film was broadcast from Oct 1961 to Aug 1962 on the ABC Television Network, starring Cynthia Pepper as the title character. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Oct 1946.
---
Daily Variety
16 Oct 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Oct 46
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 46
p. 16
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 46
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 46
p. 3, 11
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Mar 46
p. 2884.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Oct 46
p. 3261.
New York Times
17 Oct 46
p. 28.
Newsweek
23 Jun 1947.
---
Variety
16 Oct 46
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Based on stories by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
Vocal arr
Vocal arr
SOUND
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Transparencies
Transparencies
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Research dir
Research asst
STAND INS
Singing voice for Jeanne Crain
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Assoc
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "La Scandale Internationale" by Ruth McKenney in The New Yorker (15 Jan 1938) and her short stories "The Ultimate Catastrophe" and "Take the Marines Out of Nicaragua" in her book The McKenneys Carry On (New York, 1940).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Margie," music by Con Conrad and J. Russel Robinson, lyrics by Benny Davis
"My Time Is Your Time," music by Leo Dance, lyrics by Eric Little
"A Cup of Coffee, a Sandwich and You," music by Joseph Meyer, lyrics by Billy Rose and Al Dubin
+
SONGS
"Margie," music by Con Conrad and J. Russel Robinson, lyrics by Benny Davis
"My Time Is Your Time," music by Leo Dance, lyrics by Eric Little
"A Cup of Coffee, a Sandwich and You," music by Joseph Meyer, lyrics by Billy Rose and Al Dubin
"April Showers," music by Louis Silvers, lyrics by B. G. DeSylva.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 16 October 1946
Production Date:
late January--early April 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 October 1946
Copyright Number:
LP726
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in feet):
8,534
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11494
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1946, as Margie and her teenaged-daughter Joyce are rummaging through an attic looking for an old dress, Margie finds an old pair of her bloomers in a trunk. Joyce asks her mother about her school days and, while an old Rudy Vallee recording of "My Time Is Your Time" plays on a wind-up phonograph which Joyce has found, Margie relates the story of her teenage years in the late 1920s: After pretty Marybelle Tenor finishes the same song in front of Central High School, Marybelle's boyfriend Johnny, replete with raccoon coat, comes to drive her home. Margie lives next door to Marybelle with her maternal grandmother, Mrs. McSweeney, and Marybelle and Johnny normally give her a ride home. This time, however, Margie who has a crush on Johnny, discovers that the elastic in her bloomers has broken and, attempting to repair the damage with safety pins, slips into the school's library. The librarian, Isabel Palmer, is visited by the handsome, young, new French teacher, Ralph Fontayne, who discovers Margie in mid-repair. Later, while walking home with Roy Hornsdale, who is smitten by her, Margie spots her father, Angus McDuff, driving by. Margie reveals to Roy that her mother died when she was a baby and her busy father lives apart from her. Invited to meet Margie's grandmother, Roy discovers that she has been a suffragette in the campaign for woman's right to vote and has raised Margie to take a deep interest in politics. While Margie is silently rehearsing her speech for an upcoming school debate on the topic of "Should We Take the Marines out of Nicaragua?", she is interrupted by Cynthia, the maid, and Margie stops ... +


In 1946, as Margie and her teenaged-daughter Joyce are rummaging through an attic looking for an old dress, Margie finds an old pair of her bloomers in a trunk. Joyce asks her mother about her school days and, while an old Rudy Vallee recording of "My Time Is Your Time" plays on a wind-up phonograph which Joyce has found, Margie relates the story of her teenage years in the late 1920s: After pretty Marybelle Tenor finishes the same song in front of Central High School, Marybelle's boyfriend Johnny, replete with raccoon coat, comes to drive her home. Margie lives next door to Marybelle with her maternal grandmother, Mrs. McSweeney, and Marybelle and Johnny normally give her a ride home. This time, however, Margie who has a crush on Johnny, discovers that the elastic in her bloomers has broken and, attempting to repair the damage with safety pins, slips into the school's library. The librarian, Isabel Palmer, is visited by the handsome, young, new French teacher, Ralph Fontayne, who discovers Margie in mid-repair. Later, while walking home with Roy Hornsdale, who is smitten by her, Margie spots her father, Angus McDuff, driving by. Margie reveals to Roy that her mother died when she was a baby and her busy father lives apart from her. Invited to meet Margie's grandmother, Roy discovers that she has been a suffragette in the campaign for woman's right to vote and has raised Margie to take a deep interest in politics. While Margie is silently rehearsing her speech for an upcoming school debate on the topic of "Should We Take the Marines out of Nicaragua?", she is interrupted by Cynthia, the maid, and Margie stops to tell her about the new French teacher about whom all the girls are crazy. The next day, in the school cafeteria, Mr. Fontayne congratulates Margie on a theme she has written and promises to attend the debate. Marybelle is jealous of this attention paid to Margie and also of Mr. Fontayne's interest in Miss Palmer. The day of the debate, on snow covered streets, Roy arrives in his father's car to escort Margie. They stop at her mortician father's business where she leaves a message for him about the debate. Fortunately, he, her grandmother and Mr. Fontayne are able to attend and hear her deliver an impassioned argument to share America's freedom and to remove the U.S. Marines from Nicaragua. After the debate, everyone goes ice skating and while skating with Johnny, Margie's bloomers descend once again, causing her to fall. The chivalrous Mr. Fontayne, who is among those who run to help her, surreptitiously conceals and removes the garment, causing Margie some puzzlement as to just what happened to her bloomers. At home, where Margie is resting her sprained ankle, her father is still preoccupied by the issue raised in the debate. Mr. Fontayne comes to visit the "invalid" and discreetly hands her a present, the "handkerchief" she has lost. Some time later, Roy, who was supposed to be Margie's escort to the senior dance, comes down with a bad cold. When Marybelle taunts Margie by showing her orchids Johnny has sent her, Margie retaliates by inventing a mystery escort for herself. Meanwhile, Margie's father, after dismissing a salesman attempting to sell him candles manufactured in Nicaragua, phones Mrs. McSweeney, who tells him about Margie's escort problem and advises him to help out. Grandma then tells the unhappy Margie that she will have an escort to the dance. Just then, Mr. Fontayne comes by to deliver a grade for a theme Margie has written and privately confesses to Mrs. McSweeney that although he is to escort Miss Palmer to the dance, he would much rather be taking Margie McDuff. When Margie comes downstairs, she thinks Mr. Fontayne is to be her surprise escort, but upon reading the card enclosed in the corsage intended for Miss Palmer, has her hopes dashed. After Fontayne leaves, Margie's father arrives and the heartbroken Margie is delighted that he is going to be her escort. At the dance, both Johnny and Mr. Fontayne dance with Margie, much to Marybelle's displeasure. During a fast-paced dance with Johnny, Margie's bloomers descend once more. She pretends to faint and both Mr. Fontayne and Johnny go to her aid. In the attic, as Margie and Joyce laugh about the incident, Joyce wants to know who finally got to take her home from the dance and Margie replies that it was Joyce's father. As Mr. Fontayne, now the principal of Central High, enters the attic and kisses his wife, he has brought the day's newspaper which features a story that Margie's father has been appointed Minister to Nicaragua by the U.S. Senate. Margie and Joyce then dance to an old recording of "Margie," as Joyce tries to teach her mother some modern dance steps. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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