The Perfect Marriage (1947)

87 mins | Comedy-drama | 24 January 1947

Director:

Lewis Allen

Cinematographer:

Russell Metty

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Hal Wallis Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to the screen credits, David Niven appeared in the film by arrangement with Samuel Goldwyn. The film opens with the statement, "A Perfect Marriage is like a perfect crime...you never really get away with it...SOLOMON(?)." Frederick Hollander was borrowed from Warner Bros. to write this film's score. According to a Jan 1945 HR news item, Barbara Stanwyck was originally slated to play the lead in the picture. This was Eddie Albert's first film after serving two-and-a-half years in the Navy. According to a HR news item, Don DeFore was added to the film's cast in the first days of shooting; however, he was not in the released film. Ray Milland and Lizbeth Scott appeared in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of Samson Raphaelson's story on 12 Apr ... More Less

According to the screen credits, David Niven appeared in the film by arrangement with Samuel Goldwyn. The film opens with the statement, "A Perfect Marriage is like a perfect crime...you never really get away with it...SOLOMON(?)." Frederick Hollander was borrowed from Warner Bros. to write this film's score. According to a Jan 1945 HR news item, Barbara Stanwyck was originally slated to play the lead in the picture. This was Eddie Albert's first film after serving two-and-a-half years in the Navy. According to a HR news item, Don DeFore was added to the film's cast in the first days of shooting; however, he was not in the released film. Ray Milland and Lizbeth Scott appeared in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of Samson Raphaelson's story on 12 Apr 1948. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Nov 1946.
---
Daily Variety
18 Nov 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Nov 46
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 45
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 46
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 46
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 46
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 46
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 47
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Mar 46
p. 2883.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Nov 46
pp. 3321-22.
New York Times
16 Jan 47
p. 30.
Variety
20 Nov 46
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Hal B. Wallis Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Perfect Marriage by Samson Raphaelson (New York, 26 Oct 1944).
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 January 1947
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 January 1947
Production Date:
2 January--early March 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Hal Wallis Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 July 1946
Copyright Number:
LP436
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11421
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On their tenth wedding anniversary, Maggie and Dale Williams, who are thought by their friends to have a perfect marriage, confess that they have become merely "highly intimate acquaintances" who are more involved with their careers than with each other. The next morning, after their daughter Cookie tells her intrusive grandmothers that Dale slept in the study, Maggie and Dale are each confronted by their mothers, but deny any trouble. Maggie's mother, Dolly Haggerty, insists that Maggie should have married Captain Gil Cummings, her childhood sweetheart. Next, Maggie and Dale's friend, Gloria, a divorcée, visits in order to borrow a hat before breaking up with her current boyfriend. After she leaves, Dale tells Maggie how hard it is for a woman over thirty--especially one with a child--to get a man. Furious at Dale's insinuation that he is staying with her out of charity, Maggie calls their lawyer, Addison Manning, about a divorce. Addison, however, tells his friends they are merely being "petulant and sulky." Addison's wife Mabel, however, eavesdrops on the conversation and pulls Maggie aside to tell her that Dale and Gloria were seen around town together the previous summer. Maggie assumes Dale was unfaithful with Gloria, even though she knows they met as friends. Later, Maggie and Dale tell Cookie that they are getting a divorce, and she tells them that all of her friends whose parents are divorced receive nice gifts because their parents compete for their affections. Mabel then starts a chain of gossip that Maggie and Dale are divorcing, which reaches their parents and Gil, who is on leave. Gil makes a date with Maggie, ... +


On their tenth wedding anniversary, Maggie and Dale Williams, who are thought by their friends to have a perfect marriage, confess that they have become merely "highly intimate acquaintances" who are more involved with their careers than with each other. The next morning, after their daughter Cookie tells her intrusive grandmothers that Dale slept in the study, Maggie and Dale are each confronted by their mothers, but deny any trouble. Maggie's mother, Dolly Haggerty, insists that Maggie should have married Captain Gil Cummings, her childhood sweetheart. Next, Maggie and Dale's friend, Gloria, a divorcée, visits in order to borrow a hat before breaking up with her current boyfriend. After she leaves, Dale tells Maggie how hard it is for a woman over thirty--especially one with a child--to get a man. Furious at Dale's insinuation that he is staying with her out of charity, Maggie calls their lawyer, Addison Manning, about a divorce. Addison, however, tells his friends they are merely being "petulant and sulky." Addison's wife Mabel, however, eavesdrops on the conversation and pulls Maggie aside to tell her that Dale and Gloria were seen around town together the previous summer. Maggie assumes Dale was unfaithful with Gloria, even though she knows they met as friends. Later, Maggie and Dale tell Cookie that they are getting a divorce, and she tells them that all of her friends whose parents are divorced receive nice gifts because their parents compete for their affections. Mabel then starts a chain of gossip that Maggie and Dale are divorcing, which reaches their parents and Gil, who is on leave. Gil makes a date with Maggie, and Dale goes out with Gloria. Although Maggie is not anxious to remarry, Gil proposes and manipulates her into accepting him. When all four return to Maggie and Dale's apartment for drinks, Maggie and Dale align themselves against their dates over how Cookie should be reared. Gloria quickly sees that Dale is still in love with his wife and leaves. Then, while embracing Gil, Maggie's back goes out. As Dale is the only one who can make her back feel better, Gil finally leaves the couple alone in their bedroom. As he rubs Maggie's back, Dale assures her that he and Gloria met innocently. They then confess that they each had planned to give Cookie a pearl necklace. Gil, meanwhile, exits the building, and Maggie's and Dale's fathers, who have been waiting in a cab downstairs, gleefully offer him a ride just as Maggie and Dale's bedroom light goes out. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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