The Sun Comes Up (1949)

92-93 or 95 mins | Comedy-drama | February 1949

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Producer:

Robert Sisk

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Randall Duell

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Working titles for this film were A Family for Jock and Sun in the Morning . A Feb 1948 HR news item indicates that M-G-M bought the rights to Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' unpublished story "A Family for Jock," retitled it "Mountain Prelude," and sold the literary rights to The Saturday Evening Post . The story appeared The Post and has never been published in novel form. A Jan 1947 DV news item noted that Elizabeth Taylor, who had appeared in the first "Lassie" picture, was originally set to star in The Sun Comes Up . The film marked the final screen appearance of Jeanette MacDonald, who left motion pictures to pursue her stage and concert hall career. Some filming took place on location in Santa Cruz, CA. The film marked André Previn's first screen credit as a composer. The first film for which he received screen credit as a conductor was It Happened in Brooklyn (see above). For more information on the "Lassie" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Lassie Come Home ... More Less

Working titles for this film were A Family for Jock and Sun in the Morning . A Feb 1948 HR news item indicates that M-G-M bought the rights to Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' unpublished story "A Family for Jock," retitled it "Mountain Prelude," and sold the literary rights to The Saturday Evening Post . The story appeared The Post and has never been published in novel form. A Jan 1947 DV news item noted that Elizabeth Taylor, who had appeared in the first "Lassie" picture, was originally set to star in The Sun Comes Up . The film marked the final screen appearance of Jeanette MacDonald, who left motion pictures to pursue her stage and concert hall career. Some filming took place on location in Santa Cruz, CA. The film marked André Previn's first screen credit as a composer. The first film for which he received screen credit as a conductor was It Happened in Brooklyn (see above). For more information on the "Lassie" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Lassie Come Home . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Jan 1949.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1947.
---
Daily Variety
31 Dec 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
31 Jan 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 48
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 48
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 48
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 48
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Dec 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 49
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Jan 49
p. 44.
New York Times
13 May 49
p. 29.
Variety
5 Jan 49
p. 58.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Miss MacDonald's cost by
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Assoc
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the serial story Mountain Prelude by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings in The Saturday Evening Post (26 Apr--31 May 1947).
SONGS
"Tes jolies yeux," music by René Alphonse Rabey
"Un bel di" from the opera Madama Butterfly , music by Giacomo Puccini, libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa
"Als die Alte Mutter," music by Antonín Dvorák, German lyrics by Adolf Heyduck
+
SONGS
"Tes jolies yeux," music by René Alphonse Rabey
"Un bel di" from the opera Madama Butterfly , music by Giacomo Puccini, libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa
"Als die Alte Mutter," music by Antonín Dvorák, German lyrics by Adolf Heyduck
"Songs My Mother Taught Me," music by Antonín Dvorák, English lyrics by Natalie MacFarren
"Cousin Ebenezer," music by André Previn, lyrics by William Katz
"If You Were Mine," music by Anton Rubinstein, lyrics by Paul Bourget.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
A Family for Jock
Sun in the Morning
Release Date:
February 1949
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Houston, Texas: 27 January 1949
Production Date:
mid April--late June 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1948
Copyright Number:
LP2073
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
92-93 or 95
Length(in feet):
8,376
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13270
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Soprano Helen Lorfield Winter has been in seclusion and has not performed in an opera since the death of her husband three years earlier. Helen has developed an obsessive devotion to her young son Hank, rarely leaving his side, but with help from her devoted concert manager, Arthur Norton, Helen eventually overcomes her fears and agrees to return to the opera. She makes a sensational comeback, playing to a sold-out concert hall, but the evening takes a tragic turn when Hank is struck and killed by a truck while chasing after his collie, Lassie. Overcome by grief, Helen confines herself to her bed and is placed under the care of Dr. Gage. When Dr. Gage tells Helen that she must stop avoiding children and resume her normal life, Helen makes plans to leave the city and never return. Believing that Lassie had indirectly caused her son's death, Helen decides to leave the dog behind. She changes her mind, however, after her maid convinces her that Hank would have wanted Lassie to be with her. After driving along the California coast, Helen arrives at the small town of Brushy Gap, where she rents a mountain house owned by writer Thomas I. Chandler. The house is managed by the town's general store proprietor, Willie B. Williegoode, who tries to acquaint Helen with the rural lifestyle. Helen is reluctant to shed her big city ways for simple country living, but her transition is helped by a friendship she develops with a young boy named Jerry. Jerry adores Lassie and helps Helen with her chores. Despite her warm relationship with Jerry, Helen soon develops a reputation in town ... +


Soprano Helen Lorfield Winter has been in seclusion and has not performed in an opera since the death of her husband three years earlier. Helen has developed an obsessive devotion to her young son Hank, rarely leaving his side, but with help from her devoted concert manager, Arthur Norton, Helen eventually overcomes her fears and agrees to return to the opera. She makes a sensational comeback, playing to a sold-out concert hall, but the evening takes a tragic turn when Hank is struck and killed by a truck while chasing after his collie, Lassie. Overcome by grief, Helen confines herself to her bed and is placed under the care of Dr. Gage. When Dr. Gage tells Helen that she must stop avoiding children and resume her normal life, Helen makes plans to leave the city and never return. Believing that Lassie had indirectly caused her son's death, Helen decides to leave the dog behind. She changes her mind, however, after her maid convinces her that Hank would have wanted Lassie to be with her. After driving along the California coast, Helen arrives at the small town of Brushy Gap, where she rents a mountain house owned by writer Thomas I. Chandler. The house is managed by the town's general store proprietor, Willie B. Williegoode, who tries to acquaint Helen with the rural lifestyle. Helen is reluctant to shed her big city ways for simple country living, but her transition is helped by a friendship she develops with a young boy named Jerry. Jerry adores Lassie and helps Helen with her chores. Despite her warm relationship with Jerry, Helen soon develops a reputation in town of being unfriendly to children, thus inviting the scorn of the children and their mothers. However, the townspeople forgive Helen after she apologizes to them, and the children eventually accept her as a friend. When Helen discovers that Jerry and his friends all live at an orphanage, she begins to suspect that Jerry is waiting for her to adopt him. To avoid the adoption issue, Helen decides leave Brushy Gap to resume her singing career. One day, while Helen is away on a short trip, Jerry falls into a river and develops pneumonia. When Helen returns to Brushy Gap, she finds Tom living in her house and caring for Jerry. After being nursed back to health, Jerry accepts that Helen is leaving, and tries to ease her conscience by telling her that his mother lives in a nearby town and that he will return to her. Helen tries to leave Brushy Gap but returns when she hears the sounding of the town fire bell and realizes that the orphanage is on fire. While Tom and other townspeople try to extinguish the blaze, Lassie indicates that Jerry is trapped inside the burning building. Tom rescues Jerry with Lassie's help, and Jerry later admits to Tom that he lied about having a mother. However, the near tragedy has prompted Helen to realize her motherly love for Jerry, and she decides to adopt him and stay in Brushy Gap. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.