At War with the Army (1951)

92-93 mins | Comedy | 17 January 1951

Director:

Hal Walker

Cinematographer:

Stuart Thompson

Editor:

Paul Weatherwax

Production Designer:

George Jenkins
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HISTORY

This was the first film in which Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis received featured star billing. The actor who played "Sgt. Miller" is listed as Danny Dayton in the opening credits, and Dan Dayton in the end credits and contemporary reviews. According to modern sources, Screen Associates, Inc. was formed specifically to underwrite films produced by York Pictures, which featured Martin and Lewis. Although the onscreen credits read "introducing" Polly Bergen, she had previously made her screen debut in the 1949 Republic picture Across the Rio Grande under the name Polly Burgin (see ... More Less

This was the first film in which Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis received featured star billing. The actor who played "Sgt. Miller" is listed as Danny Dayton in the opening credits, and Dan Dayton in the end credits and contemporary reviews. According to modern sources, Screen Associates, Inc. was formed specifically to underwrite films produced by York Pictures, which featured Martin and Lewis. Although the onscreen credits read "introducing" Polly Bergen, she had previously made her screen debut in the 1949 Republic picture Across the Rio Grande under the name Polly Burgin (see above). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Dec 1950.
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
13 Dec 50
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 1955
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1958
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 50
p. 614.
New York Times
25 Jan 51
p. 21.
Variety
13 Dec 50
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Fred F. Finklehoffe Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Asst to the prod
WRITER
Wrt for the screen by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play At War with the Army by James B. Allardice, as presented by Henry May and Jerome E. Rosenfeld, in association with Charles Ray MacCallum (New York, 8 Mar 1949).
SONGS
"You and Your Beautiful Eyes," "Tonda Wanda Hoy" and "Beans," music and lyrics by Mack David and Jerry Livingston
"Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, That's an Irish Lullaby," music and lyrics by J. R. Shannon.
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 January 1951
Premiere Information:
San Francisco opening: 31 December 1950
Production Date:
mid July--mid August 1950 at Motion Pictures Center Studios
Copyright Claimant:
York Pictures Corp. and Screen Associates, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 January 1951
Copyright Number:
LP679
Duration(in mins):
92-93
Length(in feet):
8,481
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At an Army training camp, Private First Class Alvin Korwin is put on K.P. duty due to incompetence. Even Korwin's former best friend and songwriting partner, Sergeant Victor Puccinelli, cannot stand to be around him. Puccinelli is miserable at the camp because he wants to fight the war at the front, not from behind a desk. When Millie, an addle-brained woman he has dated, tries to see him with important news, Puccinelli panics and leaves the office to avoid her. He is then ordered to the dispensary for a physical examination and learns that he is being discharged to fulfill his request to be a warrant officer. Puccinelli asks Captain Caldwell to add his name to the list of men being shipped out, but Caldwell refuses, stating that he will only ship out men who are not useful to him. Puccinelli convinces Caldwell to put Private Edwards' name on the list, which infuriates Edwards as Puccinelli is dating his girl friend Helen. Later, when Edwards finds a note from Millie for Puccinelli, saying there will be trouble if he does not meet her, Edwards conceives of a plan to cross his rival. Korwin, meanwhile, tries to persuade Puccinelli to record a song they have written, and Puccinelli agrees only after Korwin says he is doing it for his mother. When Puccinelli goes off duty and leaves behind the lyrics sheet, Korwin goes AWOL and hides in a USO truck headed off base. Korwin emerges from the truck dressed as a woman and enters a bar, where every man is repulsed by his hairy chest, except for his drunken sergeant, McVey, whom Korwin hates. Korwin ... +


At an Army training camp, Private First Class Alvin Korwin is put on K.P. duty due to incompetence. Even Korwin's former best friend and songwriting partner, Sergeant Victor Puccinelli, cannot stand to be around him. Puccinelli is miserable at the camp because he wants to fight the war at the front, not from behind a desk. When Millie, an addle-brained woman he has dated, tries to see him with important news, Puccinelli panics and leaves the office to avoid her. He is then ordered to the dispensary for a physical examination and learns that he is being discharged to fulfill his request to be a warrant officer. Puccinelli asks Captain Caldwell to add his name to the list of men being shipped out, but Caldwell refuses, stating that he will only ship out men who are not useful to him. Puccinelli convinces Caldwell to put Private Edwards' name on the list, which infuriates Edwards as Puccinelli is dating his girl friend Helen. Later, when Edwards finds a note from Millie for Puccinelli, saying there will be trouble if he does not meet her, Edwards conceives of a plan to cross his rival. Korwin, meanwhile, tries to persuade Puccinelli to record a song they have written, and Puccinelli agrees only after Korwin says he is doing it for his mother. When Puccinelli goes off duty and leaves behind the lyrics sheet, Korwin goes AWOL and hides in a USO truck headed off base. Korwin emerges from the truck dressed as a woman and enters a bar, where every man is repulsed by his hairy chest, except for his drunken sergeant, McVey, whom Korwin hates. Korwin manages to get the lyrics to Puccinelli without being seen by him and sneaks back to the base. Puccinelli, meanwhile, flirts with Helen by serenading her as he records the song in a booth. The next day, when Caldwell promises to ship Puccinelli overseas if he can name the man responsible for Millie's "trouble," Puccinelli decides to pin the blame on Korwin. Shortly afterward, the colonel demands that his panicked officers initiate their master training program. Edwards threatens to expose Puccinelli's involvement with Millie if he does not change his orders, and while they are arguing, Korwin accidentally causes the mess hall to explode. As a result, the colonel cancels Puccinelli's shipping orders, and orders Caldwell to identify all the South Pacific islands on a map. Caldwell's wife, who always knows his orders before he does, provides him with the answers, and the rest of the camp is put through extensive training. Later, Korwin lures Puccinelli into rehearsing their songs for a USO show, while Puccinelli tells Caldwell that Korwin is responsible for Millie. Korwin, who has repeatedly asked for a three-day pass to see his wife, is mystified by Caldwell's insistence that he "do the right thing," and when Caldwell learns that Korwin's child has already been born, he grants him an emergency furlough, then questions Millie on her swift recovery. Everything is cleared up when Korwin announces that he is married to someone else, and Millie reveals that she only wants to tell Puccinelli that she recently got married and will no longer date him. Caldwell demotes Puccinelli for negligence, and shortly after, the entire camp is shipped out and Korwin's leave is canceled. Korwin now outranks Puccinelli, but does not hold it over his friend. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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