Bardelys the Magnificent (1926)

Melodrama | 21 November 1926

Director:

King Vidor

Writer:

Dorothy Farnum

Cinematographer:

William Daniels

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The 16 May 1925 Motion Picture News announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had acquired screen rights to the 1905 Rafael Sabatini novel of the same name. John Gilbert had been hired for the title role. The picture was billed as one of M-G-M’s “Quality 52” releases for the coming year. The 14 Jun 1925 FD reported that King Vidor would direct the picture, and the adaptation was underway by Dorothy Farnum. Although an advertisement in the 4 Jul 1925 Motion Picture News listed Claire Windsor as Gilbert’s co-star, she was later replaced by Eleanor Boardman, as noted in the 27 Mar 1926 Motion Picture News.
       According to the 23 Sep 1925 FD, Irving G. Thalberg would supervise the production for M-G-M, and Vidor planned to produce the picture in color. The 4 Nov 1925 FD noted that “elaborate preparations” were underway on the forthcoming color film.
       On 14 Mar 1926, FD announced that Farnum had recently completed the scenario.
       The 3 Apr 1926 Motion Picture News indicated that principal photography was underway at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Two months later, the 8 Jun 1926 FD reported that King Vidor was currently cutting Bardelys the Magnificent.
       According to the Aug 1926 Motion Picture Magazine, six men were used to double John Gilbert in the picture.
       The 17 Oct 1926 FD review deemed the film, “a rip-roaring story,” and praised the contributions of John Gilbert and King Vidor.
       In his 1953 autobiography, A Tree Is a Tree, King Vidor claimed the film's most successful ... More Less

The 16 May 1925 Motion Picture News announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had acquired screen rights to the 1905 Rafael Sabatini novel of the same name. John Gilbert had been hired for the title role. The picture was billed as one of M-G-M’s “Quality 52” releases for the coming year. The 14 Jun 1925 FD reported that King Vidor would direct the picture, and the adaptation was underway by Dorothy Farnum. Although an advertisement in the 4 Jul 1925 Motion Picture News listed Claire Windsor as Gilbert’s co-star, she was later replaced by Eleanor Boardman, as noted in the 27 Mar 1926 Motion Picture News.
       According to the 23 Sep 1925 FD, Irving G. Thalberg would supervise the production for M-G-M, and Vidor planned to produce the picture in color. The 4 Nov 1925 FD noted that “elaborate preparations” were underway on the forthcoming color film.
       On 14 Mar 1926, FD announced that Farnum had recently completed the scenario.
       The 3 Apr 1926 Motion Picture News indicated that principal photography was underway at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Two months later, the 8 Jun 1926 FD reported that King Vidor was currently cutting Bardelys the Magnificent.
       According to the Aug 1926 Motion Picture Magazine, six men were used to double John Gilbert in the picture.
       The 17 Oct 1926 FD review deemed the film, “a rip-roaring story,” and praised the contributions of John Gilbert and King Vidor.
       In his 1953 autobiography, A Tree Is a Tree, King Vidor claimed the film's most successful scene was shot from the bow of a rowboat carrying lovers John Gilbert and Eleanor Boardman through a tunnel of willow branches. "The arrangement, movement, and lighting of the scene were in complete harmony," he wrote. "The total effect was one of magic." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Jun 1925
p. 1.
Film Daily
23 Sep 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
4 Nov 1925
p. 7.
Film Daily
14 Mar 1926
p. 11.
Film Daily
8 Jun 1926
p. 8.
Film Daily
17 Oct 1926
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
1 Oct 1926
p. A9.
Motion Picture Magazine
Aug 1926.
---
Motion Picture News
16 May 1925
p. 2250, 2232-2233.
Motion Picture News
4 Jul 1925.
---
Motion Picture News
27 Mar 1926
p. 1380.
Motion Picture News
3 Apr 1926
p. 1502.
Motion Picture News
23 Oct 1926
p. 1595.
Moving Picture World
13 Nov 1926
p. 103.
New York Times
1 Nov 1926
p. 28.
Photoplay
Nov 1926
p. 53.
Variety
13 Oct 1926
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
King Vidor's production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Settings
Settings
Settings
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Bardelys the Magnificent by Rafael Sabatini (Boston & New York, 1905).
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 November 1926
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 30 September 1926
New York opening: 31 October 1926
Production Date:
early April--early June 1926
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 September 1926
Copyright Number:
LP23140
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,536
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

King Louis XIII sends Chatellerault to win Roxalanne de Lavedan, hoping to keep the girl's fortune within the kingdom. When Chatellerault reports that Roxalanne is unapproachable, Bardelys, a courtier, wagers his entire estate against Chatellerault's that he will capture the girl within three months. En route, Bardelys finds a dying man and is given a miniature and some letters bearing the name Lesperon, whose identity he assumes. Finding that Lesperon is a traitor, he seeks shelter in the Lavedan estate, and though she is frightened, Roxalanne allows him to court her. Another suitor, St. Eustache, warns her that Lesperon is engaged to Mademoiselle Mersac. Bardelys is arrested for treason, but the arrival of the king saves him from execution. Roxalanne marries Chatellerault to save Bardelys' life, but Chatellerault is killed in a duel with the courtier, who is thereafter joined with his ... +


King Louis XIII sends Chatellerault to win Roxalanne de Lavedan, hoping to keep the girl's fortune within the kingdom. When Chatellerault reports that Roxalanne is unapproachable, Bardelys, a courtier, wagers his entire estate against Chatellerault's that he will capture the girl within three months. En route, Bardelys finds a dying man and is given a miniature and some letters bearing the name Lesperon, whose identity he assumes. Finding that Lesperon is a traitor, he seeks shelter in the Lavedan estate, and though she is frightened, Roxalanne allows him to court her. Another suitor, St. Eustache, warns her that Lesperon is engaged to Mademoiselle Mersac. Bardelys is arrested for treason, but the arrival of the king saves him from execution. Roxalanne marries Chatellerault to save Bardelys' life, but Chatellerault is killed in a duel with the courtier, who is thereafter joined with his beloved. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.