Tarzan's New York Adventure (1942)

70-71 mins | Adventure | May 1942

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Producer:

Frederick Stephani

Cinematographer:

Sidney Wagner

Editor:

Gene Ruggiero

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Tarzan Against the World . A written prologue reads: "Beyond the last outpost of civilization, a mighty escarpment towers toward the skies of Africa--Uncharted on maps--A strange world--A place of mystery." Although the Copyright Catalog lists Loew's Inc. as the film's copyright claimant and there is a copyright statement on the film, the number and date listed, LP2061 on 17 Dec 1941, are incorrect in the Copyright Catalog, and the actual number and date have not been determined. The CBCS credits Matthew Boulton in the role of the "Portmaster," but that role was actually played by Miles Mander, who is credited onscreen. According to a HR news item, when the film began production, it marked the first time that M-G-M put two Tarzan films into production in the same year. Another HR news item noted that Tarzan's New York Adventure was the first of 1,200 films to be shown for free to U.S. armed forces, and a 16mm print was flown to Iceland for its initial showing on 10 May 1942.
       This film was the sixth and final film in M-G-M's "Tarzan" series and was the studio's last Tarzan film until their 1958 release, Tarzan's Fight for Life , directed by H. Bruce Humberstone and starring Gordon Scott and Eve Brent. Subsequent to the release of Tarzan's New York Adventure , series stars Johnny Weissmuller and John Sheffield continued their roles for a time with producer Sol Lesser, who released twelve Tarzan films through RKO, beginning with the 1943 film, Tarzan Triumphs . Although HR news ... More Less

The working title of the film was Tarzan Against the World . A written prologue reads: "Beyond the last outpost of civilization, a mighty escarpment towers toward the skies of Africa--Uncharted on maps--A strange world--A place of mystery." Although the Copyright Catalog lists Loew's Inc. as the film's copyright claimant and there is a copyright statement on the film, the number and date listed, LP2061 on 17 Dec 1941, are incorrect in the Copyright Catalog, and the actual number and date have not been determined. The CBCS credits Matthew Boulton in the role of the "Portmaster," but that role was actually played by Miles Mander, who is credited onscreen. According to a HR news item, when the film began production, it marked the first time that M-G-M put two Tarzan films into production in the same year. Another HR news item noted that Tarzan's New York Adventure was the first of 1,200 films to be shown for free to U.S. armed forces, and a 16mm print was flown to Iceland for its initial showing on 10 May 1942.
       This film was the sixth and final film in M-G-M's "Tarzan" series and was the studio's last Tarzan film until their 1958 release, Tarzan's Fight for Life , directed by H. Bruce Humberstone and starring Gordon Scott and Eve Brent. Subsequent to the release of Tarzan's New York Adventure , series stars Johnny Weissmuller and John Sheffield continued their roles for a time with producer Sol Lesser, who released twelve Tarzan films through RKO, beginning with the 1943 film, Tarzan Triumphs . Although HR news items indicate that Maureen O'Sullivan was initially to continue in the series as "Jane," pregnancy prevented her from appearing in Tarzan Triumphs and she never returned to the role. Frances Gifford initially took over the role, which went to Brenda Joyce in 1945. For additional information on the M-G-M and RKO Tarzan films and others featuring the Edgar Rice Burroughs character, please consult the Series Index, see the entry above for Tarzan Triumphs and see the entry for Tarzan, the Ape Man in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Apr 1942.
---
Daily Variety
15 Apr 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Apr 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 41
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 May 42
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Apr 42
p. 610.
New York Times
7 Aug 42
p. 13.
Variety
15 Apr 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
From a story by
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Animal trainer
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Virginia Grey
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
SONGS
"I'm Through with Love," music by Matt Malveck and Fud Livingston, lyrics by Gus Kahn.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Tarzan Against the World
Release Date:
May 1942
Production Date:
17 December 1941--28 January 1942
addl scenes early February 1942
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70-71
Length(in feet):
6,357
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On an escarpment in Africa, Tarzan, his wife Jane and son Boy watch as a plane lands in the distance. Tarzan, who fears the intrusion of "civilized" men, then uses vines to swing through the trees to the plane, where he finds pilot Jimmie Shields and his passengers, hunter Buck Rand and animal trainer Manchester Mountford. Learning that Buck has come from America to capture lions for zoos, Tarzan angrily tells them to leave the next day. Back at his tree-top home, Tarzan tells Jane everything, saying that only the pilot seems to understand him. Tarzan and Jane are worried because Boy is fascinated with the plane, and early the next morning, Boy secretly goes to see it with family chimpanzee Cheetah and his pet baby elephants. Buck and Manchester are impressed with Boy's ability to have the animals perform tricks and Jimmie soon realizes that Buck wants to take Boy back to America with them. When Buck invites Boy into the plane, Jimmie angrily tells Boy to leave. A few minutes later, though, after Boy bravely saves Manchester from an attacking lion, Buck shoots the lion as it is about to kill Boy. Just then, hostile natives attack. Hearing the battle from a distance, Tarzan and Jane swing toward the plane, but a native shoots an arrow through their vine and they fall to the ground. When the natives then set fires around the unconscious pair, Buck and Manchester, thinking that Tarzan and Jane are dead, quickly grab Boy and they all escape in the plane. Unknown to them, Cheetah saves Tarzan and Jane by bringing them a rope and reviving them ... +


On an escarpment in Africa, Tarzan, his wife Jane and son Boy watch as a plane lands in the distance. Tarzan, who fears the intrusion of "civilized" men, then uses vines to swing through the trees to the plane, where he finds pilot Jimmie Shields and his passengers, hunter Buck Rand and animal trainer Manchester Mountford. Learning that Buck has come from America to capture lions for zoos, Tarzan angrily tells them to leave the next day. Back at his tree-top home, Tarzan tells Jane everything, saying that only the pilot seems to understand him. Tarzan and Jane are worried because Boy is fascinated with the plane, and early the next morning, Boy secretly goes to see it with family chimpanzee Cheetah and his pet baby elephants. Buck and Manchester are impressed with Boy's ability to have the animals perform tricks and Jimmie soon realizes that Buck wants to take Boy back to America with them. When Buck invites Boy into the plane, Jimmie angrily tells Boy to leave. A few minutes later, though, after Boy bravely saves Manchester from an attacking lion, Buck shoots the lion as it is about to kill Boy. Just then, hostile natives attack. Hearing the battle from a distance, Tarzan and Jane swing toward the plane, but a native shoots an arrow through their vine and they fall to the ground. When the natives then set fires around the unconscious pair, Buck and Manchester, thinking that Tarzan and Jane are dead, quickly grab Boy and they all escape in the plane. Unknown to them, Cheetah saves Tarzan and Jane by bringing them a rope and reviving them before they are burned. Cheetah then communicates with Tarzan to let him know that Boy has been taken in the plane. Jane realizes that they must go to civilization to find Boy, and in a nearby town, she and Tarzan learn that the plane's destination was New York and trade in gold nuggets for money and clothes suitable for civilization. Although Tarzan is uncomfortable, he agrees to accompany Jane and Cheetah to New York. Once there, they learn that Jimmie is living at a posh hotel. After they check into the hotel themselves, Jane learns from a bellboy that Jimmie frequently goes to the club Moonbeam to hear his girl friend, Connie Beach, sing. That night, Connie tells them that Jimmie could not prevent Boy from being taken to a circus run by Buck and his unscrupulous partner, Colonel Ralph Sargent. Meanwhile, at the circus, Manchester has befriended Boy, who tells his troubles to his new elephant friends. Because their own circus is not doing well, Sargeant and Buck are eager to sell Boy's services for $100,000 to a South American circus. When Tarzan, Jane and Cheetah show up at the circus looking for Boy, Buck tries to sneak him away, but Tarzan lets out a jungle yell and Boy recognizes it. He is whisked away by Buck as Tarzan and Sargent scuffle. When the police arrive with Jimmie and Connie, Jimmie reveals that Sargent has posted an immigration bond for Boy and Jane tells Tarzan that they must now trust the law. At a guardianship hearing, Tarzan and Jane's lawyer argues their case, but when Sargent's lawyer forces Jane to admit that Boy's real parents died in a jungle plane crash, Tarzan lunges at him. During a recess, Jane encourages Tarzan to use his own law to get Boy back and he flees across the city's skyscrapers. He then hails a taxi to drive him to the circus, but when the police stop the taxi on the Brooklyn Bridge, Tarzan climbs to the top and dives into the water. At the circus, Manchester helps Boy escape from Buck and Sargent and the child runs to the high wires. Tarzan soon arrives and swings to Boy's rescue, but Sargent's men capture him and place him in a cage. With the aid of the elephants, Tarzan breaks free and finally stops Buck and Sargent from escaping with Boy. Back in the courtroom, Tarzan is sentenced to thirty days in jail, but the sympathetic judge suspends his sentence and promises to go fishing in Africa soon. Tarzan now realizes that law is good and the family happily returns to their jungle home. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.