Beau Sabreur (1928)

67 mins | Romance | 7 January 1928

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HISTORY

According to the 26 Jun 1927 FD, French Foreign Legion veteran Louis Van Den Ecker, who served as technical director of Beau Geste (1927, see entry), had been hired in a similar capacity for Beau Sabreur. Milton F. Hoffman was scheduled to supervise the production. Neither man is listed in credits.
       Beau Sabreur was based on the second of Percival Christopher Wren's trilogy of Foreign Legion novels. The first novel, Beau Geste was the basis for the earlier Paramount film directed by Herbert Brenon and starring Ronald Colman, Neil Hamilton and Ralph Forbes. Although Beau Sabreur was not directly related to Beau Geste , the character "Major de Beaujolais" appears in both films. A 1931 RKO release, Beau Ideal (see entry), was based on Wren's third Foreign Legion novel. That film also was directed by Herbert Brenon and starred Frank McCormack, as well as Ralph Forbes, who revived his role as "John Geste."
       For information on other film adaptations of Percival Christopher Wren's novels, please consult the entry for the 1939 Paramount production of Beau Geste, directed by William A. Wellman and starring Gary Cooper and Ray ... More Less

According to the 26 Jun 1927 FD, French Foreign Legion veteran Louis Van Den Ecker, who served as technical director of Beau Geste (1927, see entry), had been hired in a similar capacity for Beau Sabreur. Milton F. Hoffman was scheduled to supervise the production. Neither man is listed in credits.
       Beau Sabreur was based on the second of Percival Christopher Wren's trilogy of Foreign Legion novels. The first novel, Beau Geste was the basis for the earlier Paramount film directed by Herbert Brenon and starring Ronald Colman, Neil Hamilton and Ralph Forbes. Although Beau Sabreur was not directly related to Beau Geste , the character "Major de Beaujolais" appears in both films. A 1931 RKO release, Beau Ideal (see entry), was based on Wren's third Foreign Legion novel. That film also was directed by Herbert Brenon and starred Frank McCormack, as well as Ralph Forbes, who revived his role as "John Geste."
       For information on other film adaptations of Percival Christopher Wren's novels, please consult the entry for the 1939 Paramount production of Beau Geste, directed by William A. Wellman and starring Gary Cooper and Ray Milland. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 Jun 1927
p. 6.
Film Daily
29 Jan 1928.
---
New York Times
23 Jan 1928
p. 18.
Variety
25 Jan 1928
p. 12.
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 January 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 23 January 1928
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 January 1928
Copyright Number:
LP24838
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67
Length(in feet):
6,704
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Legionnaires Henri de Beaujolais, Raoul de Redon, and Dufour overstay their leave in Algiers and are thrown into jail. There Henri earns the title "Beau Sabreur," given him by his uncle, General Beaujolais, when he wins a duel with a traitor, Becque. The general, who has plans for the Sahara, entreats Henri to forsake women for France, sending him first to the desert to learn the customs of the people, then to Zaguig, where he meets American journalist Mary Vanbrugh, whom he snubs, remembering his vow. Becque, hearing that Henri has orders to visit Sheikh El Hammel at a distant oasis to discuss a treaty, and hoping to prevent his departure, attacks Zaguig, but Henri escapes with Mary, her maid, and his aides. Out of distrust for Becque, the sheikh agrees to a treaty with the French, and they resist an attack led by the vengeful Becque. Henri kills Becque in a duel and, having accomplished his task for France, confesses he loves ... +


Legionnaires Henri de Beaujolais, Raoul de Redon, and Dufour overstay their leave in Algiers and are thrown into jail. There Henri earns the title "Beau Sabreur," given him by his uncle, General Beaujolais, when he wins a duel with a traitor, Becque. The general, who has plans for the Sahara, entreats Henri to forsake women for France, sending him first to the desert to learn the customs of the people, then to Zaguig, where he meets American journalist Mary Vanbrugh, whom he snubs, remembering his vow. Becque, hearing that Henri has orders to visit Sheikh El Hammel at a distant oasis to discuss a treaty, and hoping to prevent his departure, attacks Zaguig, but Henri escapes with Mary, her maid, and his aides. Out of distrust for Becque, the sheikh agrees to a treaty with the French, and they resist an attack led by the vengeful Becque. Henri kills Becque in a duel and, having accomplished his task for France, confesses he loves Mary. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.