The Brass Bottle (1923)

Comedy, Fantasy | 22 July 1923

Writer:

Fred Myton

Cinematographer:

Arthur L. Todd

Editor:

Frank Lawrence

Production Designer:

Milton Menasco

Production Company:

Maurice Tourneur Productions
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HISTORY

The Nov 1923 Motion Picture Magazine reported that "Charlie," an elephant, attacked his trainer during filming and badly injured him. It was not Charlie's first offense, and he was "sentenced to die." An original plan was to tow him out into the Pacific on a barge and force him to jump into the water.
       Although The Brass Bottle was planned as an eight-reel film, it was edited down to six reels for release, according to the 7 Jul 1923 Motion Picture News. The 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Herald explained that exhibitors had complained about films being too long, especially those "away from the common run of film entertainment," most likely because they limited the number of screenings per day. Exhibitors called 6,000 feet "the ideal length of a feature."
       The Brass Bottle premiered at Broadway's Strand Theatre in New York on 22 Jul 1923, according to the 4 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Herald.
       Reviewers, including the one in the 28 Jul 1923 Motion Picture News, remarked on the "phantasmagorical" production's "massive sets," special effects, and colorful characters. ... More Less

The Nov 1923 Motion Picture Magazine reported that "Charlie," an elephant, attacked his trainer during filming and badly injured him. It was not Charlie's first offense, and he was "sentenced to die." An original plan was to tow him out into the Pacific on a barge and force him to jump into the water.
       Although The Brass Bottle was planned as an eight-reel film, it was edited down to six reels for release, according to the 7 Jul 1923 Motion Picture News. The 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Herald explained that exhibitors had complained about films being too long, especially those "away from the common run of film entertainment," most likely because they limited the number of screenings per day. Exhibitors called 6,000 feet "the ideal length of a feature."
       The Brass Bottle premiered at Broadway's Strand Theatre in New York on 22 Jul 1923, according to the 4 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Herald.
       Reviewers, including the one in the 28 Jul 1923 Motion Picture News, remarked on the "phantasmagorical" production's "massive sets," special effects, and colorful characters. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
7 Jul 1923
p. 190.
Exhibitors Herald
4 Aug 1923.
p. 47.
Harrison's Reports
4 Aug 1923.
---
Motion Picture Magazine
Nov 1923
p. 81.
Motion Picture News
7 Jul 1923
p. 57.
Motion Picture News
28 Jul 1923
p. 419.
New York Times
23 Jul 1923.
---
Washington Post
23 Aug 1923.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Presented by M. C. Levee
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Pers dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Brass Bottle by F. Anstey (London, 1900).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 July 1923
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 22 July 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Maurice Tourneur Productions
Copyright Date:
3 July 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19170
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,290
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the ancient kingdom of Suleyman, Fakresh-al-Aamash plots to kill his royal master and run away with his wife, but he is found out, sealed in a bottle, and tossed into the sea. More than 6,400 years later, in London, England, a penniless American architect named Horace Ventimore bids on and wins a brass bottle with the last of his money, and presents it to Professor Hamilton, the archeologist father of Sylvia Hamilton, the woman he loves. After the professor scoffs at him for buying a fake antique, Horace throws it across the room and breaks the seal. Fakresh, the genie, emerges and promises to grant Horace’s every wish in return for his freedom. Horace wishes first for a client, but then adds that he would like to marry Professor Hamilton’s daughter. The next morning, while a new client arrives at Horace’s place with a project and a hefty retainer, the genie visits the professor to convince him to permit the young architect to marry Sylvia. When Professor Hamilton becomes outraged, the genie turns him into a donkey, whose sudden thrashing and kicking bring his wife and daughter into the room. The genie calms the animal, then changes him back into the professor. Returning to Horace’s apartment, where the Hamiltons are expected later in the day, the genie transforms it into an Arabian palace with slaves and dancing girls, duly shocking Horace and then his guests. Fakresh continues to grant wishes to Horace, but each one turns into trouble. Finally, after Horace becomes successful and obtains Sylvia’s hand in marriage, he tricks Fakresh back into the brass bottle, and caps ... +


In the ancient kingdom of Suleyman, Fakresh-al-Aamash plots to kill his royal master and run away with his wife, but he is found out, sealed in a bottle, and tossed into the sea. More than 6,400 years later, in London, England, a penniless American architect named Horace Ventimore bids on and wins a brass bottle with the last of his money, and presents it to Professor Hamilton, the archeologist father of Sylvia Hamilton, the woman he loves. After the professor scoffs at him for buying a fake antique, Horace throws it across the room and breaks the seal. Fakresh, the genie, emerges and promises to grant Horace’s every wish in return for his freedom. Horace wishes first for a client, but then adds that he would like to marry Professor Hamilton’s daughter. The next morning, while a new client arrives at Horace’s place with a project and a hefty retainer, the genie visits the professor to convince him to permit the young architect to marry Sylvia. When Professor Hamilton becomes outraged, the genie turns him into a donkey, whose sudden thrashing and kicking bring his wife and daughter into the room. The genie calms the animal, then changes him back into the professor. Returning to Horace’s apartment, where the Hamiltons are expected later in the day, the genie transforms it into an Arabian palace with slaves and dancing girls, duly shocking Horace and then his guests. Fakresh continues to grant wishes to Horace, but each one turns into trouble. Finally, after Horace becomes successful and obtains Sylvia’s hand in marriage, he tricks Fakresh back into the brass bottle, and caps it. +

GENRE
Genres:
Sub-genre:
Arabian


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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