A Doll's House (1922)

Drama | 12 February 1922

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HISTORY

A Doll’s House was Russian actress Alla Nazimova’s first “repertoire” film produced by her own company in conjunction with the United Artists Corporation, the 29 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review announced. Nazimova was already famous for portraying “Nora Helmer” when the Henrik Ibsen play ran on Broadway. She planned to accompany the five-reel film with a second, two-reel version of Oscar Wilde’s play, Salome, but abandoned the idea, expanded A Doll’s House into a seven-reel film, and developed Salome into a full-length feature the following year.
       Filming was set to begin 1 Nov 1921, according to the 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News.
       The 1 Dec 1921 American Cinematographer reported that a modern, "highest class" Mitchell camera was being used to film the production.
The 17 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News announced that three more weeks would be required to complete filming of A Doll's House.
       The 4 Mar 1922 Moving Picture World noted that A Doll’s House opened at the Strand Theatre on Broadway in New York City.
       The 25 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald remarked that Nazimova updated and Americanized the nineteenth-century Swedish play with modern appliances and wristwatches. “Little or no attempt has been made…to give it the original atmosphere or locale.”
       Although A Doll’s House garnered generally good reviews, the Jun 1922 The Educational Screen panned it as one of its “Ten Worst Productions” of the year “so far,” calling the film: “Faithful in settings but absurd in every other respect. Mme. Nazimova gives us a ... More Less

A Doll’s House was Russian actress Alla Nazimova’s first “repertoire” film produced by her own company in conjunction with the United Artists Corporation, the 29 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review announced. Nazimova was already famous for portraying “Nora Helmer” when the Henrik Ibsen play ran on Broadway. She planned to accompany the five-reel film with a second, two-reel version of Oscar Wilde’s play, Salome, but abandoned the idea, expanded A Doll’s House into a seven-reel film, and developed Salome into a full-length feature the following year.
       Filming was set to begin 1 Nov 1921, according to the 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News.
       The 1 Dec 1921 American Cinematographer reported that a modern, "highest class" Mitchell camera was being used to film the production.
The 17 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News announced that three more weeks would be required to complete filming of A Doll's House.
       The 4 Mar 1922 Moving Picture World noted that A Doll’s House opened at the Strand Theatre on Broadway in New York City.
       The 25 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald remarked that Nazimova updated and Americanized the nineteenth-century Swedish play with modern appliances and wristwatches. “Little or no attempt has been made…to give it the original atmosphere or locale.”
       Although A Doll’s House garnered generally good reviews, the Jun 1922 The Educational Screen panned it as one of its “Ten Worst Productions” of the year “so far,” calling the film: “Faithful in settings but absurd in every other respect. Mme. Nazimova gives us a series of ugly grimacing close-ups.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
1 Dec 1921
p. 14.
Exhibitors Herald
21 Jan 1922
p. 3.
Exhibitors Herald
25 Mar 1922
p. 60.
Exhibitors Trade Review
29 Oct 1921
p. 1507.
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Jan 1922
p. 598.
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Feb 1922
p. 937.
Motion Picture News
29 Oct 1921
p. 2352.
Motion Picture News
17 Dec 1921
p. 4.
Moving Picture World
4 Mar 1922
p. 50.
The Educational Screen
Jun 1922
p. 203.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Et dukkehjem by Henrik Ibsen (Copenhagen, 21 Dec 1879).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 February 1922
Premiere Information:
12 Feb 1922
Production Date:
began 1 Nov 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Nazimova Productions
Copyright Date:
13 February 1922
Copyright Number:
LP17555
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,650
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In order that her husband may recover his health in a warmer climate, Nora Helmer goes to Krogstad, a moneylender, and forges her father's name to a note. Six years later, Torvald, her husband, has risen to managership in a bank, but refuses to retain Krogstad in his employ; the latter threatens Nora with exposure unless she uses her influence on his behalf. In spite of Nora's efforts, her husband denounces Krogstad as a criminal, and in desperation Krogstad sends Torvald a letter exposing Nora's forgery. Instead of shielding his wife, Torvald is infuriated at the blow to his reputation. However, influenced by Mrs. Linden, Krogstad relents, withdraws his accusation, and stamps Nora's original note as “Paid.” Everything returns to normal, but with her illusions about her marriage shattered, Nora perceives the truth about her doll-like existence and asserts her right to live her own life. As she leaves her husband and children, Nora slams the door behind ... +


In order that her husband may recover his health in a warmer climate, Nora Helmer goes to Krogstad, a moneylender, and forges her father's name to a note. Six years later, Torvald, her husband, has risen to managership in a bank, but refuses to retain Krogstad in his employ; the latter threatens Nora with exposure unless she uses her influence on his behalf. In spite of Nora's efforts, her husband denounces Krogstad as a criminal, and in desperation Krogstad sends Torvald a letter exposing Nora's forgery. Instead of shielding his wife, Torvald is infuriated at the blow to his reputation. However, influenced by Mrs. Linden, Krogstad relents, withdraws his accusation, and stamps Nora's original note as “Paid.” Everything returns to normal, but with her illusions about her marriage shattered, Nora perceives the truth about her doll-like existence and asserts her right to live her own life. As she leaves her husband and children, Nora slams the door behind her. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.