Thank You, Jeeves! (1936)

55 or 57 mins | Comedy | 23 October 1936

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HISTORY

The title card in the opening credits reads: "P. G. Wodehouse's Thank You, Jeeves! " This was the first of a planned series of several films built around the P. G. Wodehouse character "Jeeves". According to a HR news item in Oct 1935, as a publicity stunt, the public would be asked to name the actor it considers best to portray "Jeeves". It is not known if Arthur Treacher was selected by the public. Twentieth Century-Fox only produced one other film in the series, the 1937 Step Lively, Jeeves! , which also starred Treacher as "Jeeves" and which was directed by Eugene Forde (see above). David Niven did not appear in the latter film, and NYT commented that the studio made a mistake in starting the series with only Treacher signed to a contract. NYT noted that when studio heads Darryl Zanuck and Joseph Schenck , who "left Goldwyn amid heated words" when they resigned from United Artists to merge their company, Twentieth Century, with Fox, tried to buy Niven's contract from Goldwyn, they received an emphatic refusal. Arthur Greville Collins earlier had been a London stage director. According to MPH , all of the cast members were British except Willie Best. According to modern sources, the film was retitled Thank You, Mr. Jeeves . In 1965, BBC-1 broadcasted a television series using the Wodehouse characters, which was first entitled The World of Wooster , and later, P. G. Wodehouse's The World of Wooster and The World of Wodehouse . The series was produced by Michael Mills and ... More Less

The title card in the opening credits reads: "P. G. Wodehouse's Thank You, Jeeves! " This was the first of a planned series of several films built around the P. G. Wodehouse character "Jeeves". According to a HR news item in Oct 1935, as a publicity stunt, the public would be asked to name the actor it considers best to portray "Jeeves". It is not known if Arthur Treacher was selected by the public. Twentieth Century-Fox only produced one other film in the series, the 1937 Step Lively, Jeeves! , which also starred Treacher as "Jeeves" and which was directed by Eugene Forde (see above). David Niven did not appear in the latter film, and NYT commented that the studio made a mistake in starting the series with only Treacher signed to a contract. NYT noted that when studio heads Darryl Zanuck and Joseph Schenck , who "left Goldwyn amid heated words" when they resigned from United Artists to merge their company, Twentieth Century, with Fox, tried to buy Niven's contract from Goldwyn, they received an emphatic refusal. Arthur Greville Collins earlier had been a London stage director. According to MPH , all of the cast members were British except Willie Best. According to modern sources, the film was retitled Thank You, Mr. Jeeves . In 1965, BBC-1 broadcasted a television series using the Wodehouse characters, which was first entitled The World of Wooster , and later, P. G. Wodehouse's The World of Wooster and The World of Wodehouse . The series was produced by Michael Mills and starred Ian Carmichael and Dennis Price. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Sep 1936.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jul 36
p. 8.
Daily Variety
10 Sep 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Sep 36
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 36
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
11 Sep 36
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Aug 36
p. 52.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Sep 36
p. 48.
New York Times
19 Jul 1936.
---
New York Times
5 Oct 36
p. 25.
Variety
23 Sep 36
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Exec prod
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Thank You, Jeeves by Pelham G. Wodehouse (London, 1934).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
P. G. Wodehouse's Thank You, Jeeves!
Release Date:
23 October 1936
Premiere Information:
Brooklyn, N.Y. opening: 17 September 1936
Production Date:
7 July--late July 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
2 October 1936
Copyright Number:
LP7960
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55 or 57
Length(in feet):
5,135
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2488
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Bertie Wooster expresses the desire to go to Deauville in search of adventure and romance, his "gentleman's gentleman" Jeeves gives notice that he will leave the next morning because Bertie's earlier exploits endangered the placid Jeeves. That night, a mysterious woman followed by two men takes refuge in the Wooster home in London to Bertie's delight. The next day, annoyed that Jeeves let the woman leave during the night, Bertie, having learned from a telegram that she was expected at Mooring Manor Hotel, convinces Jeeves that they should go there. On the road, Jeeves and Bertie pick up Drowsy, a stranded black American saxophonist. After a furious chase, Tom Brock and Jack Stone, the men who followed the woman, identify themselves to Jeeves and Bertie as Scotland Yard agents and say that the woman stole important papers. At the hotel, which was once the manor of a viscount, the woman, Marjorie Lowman, is surprised when the clerk relates that Edward McDermott, whom she telephoned there the previous evening, has never been there. Elliott Manville, who attacked McDermott and took his half of a blueprint, tells her that he will help. Bertie tries to convince Marjorie to give up to the police and to marry him, while Jeeves teaches Drowsy to play "The March of the Hussars." Carried away by the finale, the two crash through a trap door into the cellar. Marjorie follows Brock and Stone through a secret compartment leading to the cellar, where she pulls a gun on them and Manville. Bertie, who has followed her, takes her gun and gives it to Manville before he realizes that they ... +


When Bertie Wooster expresses the desire to go to Deauville in search of adventure and romance, his "gentleman's gentleman" Jeeves gives notice that he will leave the next morning because Bertie's earlier exploits endangered the placid Jeeves. That night, a mysterious woman followed by two men takes refuge in the Wooster home in London to Bertie's delight. The next day, annoyed that Jeeves let the woman leave during the night, Bertie, having learned from a telegram that she was expected at Mooring Manor Hotel, convinces Jeeves that they should go there. On the road, Jeeves and Bertie pick up Drowsy, a stranded black American saxophonist. After a furious chase, Tom Brock and Jack Stone, the men who followed the woman, identify themselves to Jeeves and Bertie as Scotland Yard agents and say that the woman stole important papers. At the hotel, which was once the manor of a viscount, the woman, Marjorie Lowman, is surprised when the clerk relates that Edward McDermott, whom she telephoned there the previous evening, has never been there. Elliott Manville, who attacked McDermott and took his half of a blueprint, tells her that he will help. Bertie tries to convince Marjorie to give up to the police and to marry him, while Jeeves teaches Drowsy to play "The March of the Hussars." Carried away by the finale, the two crash through a trap door into the cellar. Marjorie follows Brock and Stone through a secret compartment leading to the cellar, where she pulls a gun on them and Manville. Bertie, who has followed her, takes her gun and gives it to Manville before he realizes that they are not policemen. After they get Marjorie's half of the blueprint, Bertie switches out the lights, grabs the plans and rushes out with Marjorie. Jeeves, formerly an amateur fighter, knocks out their pursuers and fights the hotel staff with medieval weapons which he finds lodged in the cellar. After McDermott, who is Marjorie's cousin, arrives with the police, Marjorie explains that Manville wanted to sell the plans for McDermott's invention to a foreign government. Bertie, who had been chained to the wall along with the crooks by Drowsy after Jeeves mistakenly clunked his helmeted head, proposes to Marjorie, who accepts. Jeeves gives notice again and begins to file off the chains. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.