Man of the Forest (1933)

59 or 62.5-63 mins | Western | 14 July 1933

Full page view
HISTORY

Financial information located in the Paramount script files at the AMPAS library notes that the negative cost of this film was $116,970.30. According to the pressbook, some scenes were filmed on location in Rancho Las Virgenes, CA. According to a modern source, Randolph Scott was bitten by the cougar during the filming of a scene in which he plays with the cat. Zane Grey's story was first filmed in 1926 by Paramount, directed by John Waters and starring Jack Holt and Georgia Hale (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1921-30 ; ... More Less

Financial information located in the Paramount script files at the AMPAS library notes that the negative cost of this film was $116,970.30. According to the pressbook, some scenes were filmed on location in Rancho Las Virgenes, CA. According to a modern source, Randolph Scott was bitten by the cougar during the filming of a scene in which he plays with the cat. Zane Grey's story was first filmed in 1926 by Paramount, directed by John Waters and starring Jack Holt and Georgia Hale (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1921-30 ; F2.3414). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
25 Aug 33
p. 9.
Motion Picture Daily
25 Aug 33
p. 14.
Variety
31-Oct-33
---
Variety
14 Nov 33
p. 30.
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 July 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 July 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4009
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
59 or 62.5-63
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Mountain trapper Brett Dale meets his friend Jim Gayner by the lake shore, where Jim tells Brett that he is struggling against neighboring land owner Clint Beasley to keep his water rights. Jim has sent for his niece Alice to help maintain ownership of the lake property. Later, Brett overhears Beasley and his men, who also work for Jim, plotting to kidnap Alice. Brett foils their plan, saves Alice and takes her to his mountain cabin to wait for her uncle. Unaware of his identity, she is outraged and tries to leave, but Brett's pet lions intimidate her and she decides not to leave. When Jim realizes that Brett has taken Alice to protect her, he rides up to the cabin. Beasley and his men, who arrive at the same time, kill Jim, then buy off the sheriff so that Brett is arrested for the murder. Beasley then tricks Alice into staying at his house under the care of his housekeeper, Mrs. Forney. Beasley also signs a deed for the water rights and gives it to the sheriff to file in the morning. That evening he tries to force himself on Alice but Mrs. Forney intervenes. Meanwhile, Brett's lion "Mike" gets into the jail and begins to maul the sheriff until he confesses the true murderer's identity and releases Brett, who retrieves the deed. Brett's sidekicks, Big Casino and Little Casino, help Alice escape from Beasley's, and they all hide in a barn until a shoot-out starts between Brett and Beasley's men and the barn is set on fire. Beasley grabs Alice, but Brett fights him until Mrs. Forney shoots Beasley from a window. ... +


Mountain trapper Brett Dale meets his friend Jim Gayner by the lake shore, where Jim tells Brett that he is struggling against neighboring land owner Clint Beasley to keep his water rights. Jim has sent for his niece Alice to help maintain ownership of the lake property. Later, Brett overhears Beasley and his men, who also work for Jim, plotting to kidnap Alice. Brett foils their plan, saves Alice and takes her to his mountain cabin to wait for her uncle. Unaware of his identity, she is outraged and tries to leave, but Brett's pet lions intimidate her and she decides not to leave. When Jim realizes that Brett has taken Alice to protect her, he rides up to the cabin. Beasley and his men, who arrive at the same time, kill Jim, then buy off the sheriff so that Brett is arrested for the murder. Beasley then tricks Alice into staying at his house under the care of his housekeeper, Mrs. Forney. Beasley also signs a deed for the water rights and gives it to the sheriff to file in the morning. That evening he tries to force himself on Alice but Mrs. Forney intervenes. Meanwhile, Brett's lion "Mike" gets into the jail and begins to maul the sheriff until he confesses the true murderer's identity and releases Brett, who retrieves the deed. Brett's sidekicks, Big Casino and Little Casino, help Alice escape from Beasley's, and they all hide in a barn until a shoot-out starts between Brett and Beasley's men and the barn is set on fire. Beasley grabs Alice, but Brett fights him until Mrs. Forney shoots Beasley from a window. Peace is restored and Brett and Alice are happy together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.