Way of a Gaucho (1952)

87 or 90-91 mins | Drama | October 1952

Director:

Jacques Tourneur

Writer:

Philip Dunne

Producer:

Philip Dunne

Cinematographer:

Harry Jackson

Editor:

Robert Fritch

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Mark-Lee Kirk

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

At the end of the opening credits for this film, a written acknowledgment reads: "This picture was filmed in its natural settings in Argentina. Twentieth Century-Fox acknowledges with gratitude the assistance and cooperation of the Argentine Government." According to contemporary news items, Henry King was originally set to direct the film, and Tyrone Power was cast in the leading role. A May 1951 HR news item noted that King requested a transfer to another picture and was replaced by Jacques Tourneur. A Jun 1951 LAEx article reported that Power had been placed on suspension by Twentieth Century-Fox for refusing the role; he reportedly did not want to make any more "costume pictures." The article noted that Dale Robertson was tentatively set to replace him. Aug and Sep 1951 HR news items noted that Jean Peters had originally been cast as "Teresa" but had to withdraw from the role due to health reasons. An Aug 1951 NYT article incorrectly lists Michael Rennie in the cast instead of Hugh Marlowe.
       As noted in the onscreen credits, the film was largely shot on location in Argentina, but some scenes were shot on location in California near Pacific Palisades and Vasquez Rocks. Both Robert Webb and Henry Levin briefly filled in for Tourneur when he was suffering from a back injury. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in order to receive official cooperation from the Argentine government, the studio agreed to shoot a short film about "certain Argentine charities supervised by Mrs. [Eva] Peron."
       According ... More Less

At the end of the opening credits for this film, a written acknowledgment reads: "This picture was filmed in its natural settings in Argentina. Twentieth Century-Fox acknowledges with gratitude the assistance and cooperation of the Argentine Government." According to contemporary news items, Henry King was originally set to direct the film, and Tyrone Power was cast in the leading role. A May 1951 HR news item noted that King requested a transfer to another picture and was replaced by Jacques Tourneur. A Jun 1951 LAEx article reported that Power had been placed on suspension by Twentieth Century-Fox for refusing the role; he reportedly did not want to make any more "costume pictures." The article noted that Dale Robertson was tentatively set to replace him. Aug and Sep 1951 HR news items noted that Jean Peters had originally been cast as "Teresa" but had to withdraw from the role due to health reasons. An Aug 1951 NYT article incorrectly lists Michael Rennie in the cast instead of Hugh Marlowe.
       As noted in the onscreen credits, the film was largely shot on location in Argentina, but some scenes were shot on location in California near Pacific Palisades and Vasquez Rocks. Both Robert Webb and Henry Levin briefly filled in for Tourneur when he was suffering from a back injury. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in order to receive official cooperation from the Argentine government, the studio agreed to shoot a short film about "certain Argentine charities supervised by Mrs. [Eva] Peron."
       According to HR news items, a preview of the film was held on 30 Sep 1951 aboard the ocean liner S.S. Argentina . The liner was docked in New York, and according to HR , "close to five hundred newspapermen, stars and representives of the city, United Nations and the Argentine government" attended the screening. Modern sources note that Ray Klune served as the film's production manager. Way of a Gaucho marked the first assignment as a producer for noted screenwriter Philip Dunne. A 10 Oct 1953 SEP article reported that the film was very well received in Latin and South America. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Oct 1952.
---
Daily Variety
2 Oct 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Oct 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Citizen-News
30 Oct 1952.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 51
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 52
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 52
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 52
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Feb 52
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Sep 52
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 52
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 52
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
28 Jun 1951.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jan 1951.
---
Motion Picture Daily
7 Oct 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Oct 52
p. 1549.
New York Times
21 Aug 1951.
---
New York Times
13 Jan 1952.
---
New York Times
5 Nov 52
p. 36.
Newsweek
3 Nov 1952.
---
The Saturday Evening Post
10 Oct 1953.
---
Variety
9 Jan 1952.
---
Variety
8 Oct 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Fill-In dir
Fill-In dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
STAND INS
Double
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Way of a Gaucho by Herbert Childs (New York, 1948).
SONGS
"La Huella, Huella," music and lyrics by Felix R. Palorma, English lyrics by Philip Dunne.
DETAILS
Release Date:
October 1952
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Atlanta, GA: 10 October 1952
Los Angeles opening: 29 October 1952
Production Date:
mid October 1951--mid January 1952
retakes and addl seq 18 February--late February 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
24 September 1952
Copyright Number:
LP2035
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
87 or 90-91
Length(in feet):
10,567
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15615
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1875, rugged Argentine gaucho Martin Penalosa welcomes his lifelong friend, Don Miguel Aleondo, back to the Aleondo estancia, his ranch. Due to the death of his father, Miguel is returning to the ranch after a long absence, and the other gauchos mistrust his "city ways." During the fiesta celebrating Miguel's arrival, Martin takes offense when a fellow gaucho disparages Miguel, and kills him in a knife fight. Miguel allows Martin to be arrested, despite Martin's declaration that it is the gaucho way to fight for one's honor. In prison, Martin meets fellow gaucho Falcon and stiffly greets Miguel when he visits. Miguel explains that he arranged for Martin to serve in the army rather than be imprisoned, and assures him he will always be welcome at the ranch. Martin and Falcon then go to the fort overseen by tough disciplinarian Maj. Salinas, who admires the gauchos' courage even though he is determined to turn them into good soldiers. Martin resents Salinas' strictness, and one day, after the soldiers fight off an advancing group of Indians, Martin deserts. While he is riding, Martin sees an Indian carrying off a screaming woman, and succeeds in killing the Indian and rescuing the woman, who is Teresa Chavez, Miguel's fiancée. Despite the initial animosity between the arrogant Martin and Teresa, an aristocratic city-dweller, Martin escorts her to the Aleondo ranch. During their journey, an attraction between Martin and Teresa grows, and she is distraught when he is captured by Salinas' men. Determined to extinguish Martin's rebelliousness, Salinas has him staked out on the ground and leaves him there for several days. Martin refuses ... +


In 1875, rugged Argentine gaucho Martin Penalosa welcomes his lifelong friend, Don Miguel Aleondo, back to the Aleondo estancia, his ranch. Due to the death of his father, Miguel is returning to the ranch after a long absence, and the other gauchos mistrust his "city ways." During the fiesta celebrating Miguel's arrival, Martin takes offense when a fellow gaucho disparages Miguel, and kills him in a knife fight. Miguel allows Martin to be arrested, despite Martin's declaration that it is the gaucho way to fight for one's honor. In prison, Martin meets fellow gaucho Falcon and stiffly greets Miguel when he visits. Miguel explains that he arranged for Martin to serve in the army rather than be imprisoned, and assures him he will always be welcome at the ranch. Martin and Falcon then go to the fort overseen by tough disciplinarian Maj. Salinas, who admires the gauchos' courage even though he is determined to turn them into good soldiers. Martin resents Salinas' strictness, and one day, after the soldiers fight off an advancing group of Indians, Martin deserts. While he is riding, Martin sees an Indian carrying off a screaming woman, and succeeds in killing the Indian and rescuing the woman, who is Teresa Chavez, Miguel's fiancée. Despite the initial animosity between the arrogant Martin and Teresa, an aristocratic city-dweller, Martin escorts her to the Aleondo ranch. During their journey, an attraction between Martin and Teresa grows, and she is distraught when he is captured by Salinas' men. Determined to extinguish Martin's rebelliousness, Salinas has him staked out on the ground and leaves him there for several days. Martin refuses to submit, and one night, Falcon helps to free him. Before leaving, however, Martin challenges Salinas to a knife fight, and when Salinas tries to shoot him, Martin slashes his arm. During the day, a patrol pursues Martin but the gaucho scout leading them does not reveal his location. Martin then travels through a desert, where he comes across a bandit known as Valverde. Badly hurt when his horse fell on him, Valverde speaks only a few words to Martin before dying. Martin then assumes Valverde's identity and, joined by renegade gauchos, Indians and army deserters, starts a band of rebels who attempt to prevent the encroachment of civilization upon the wild pampas. "Valverde's" notoriety grows, and Salinas, who has left the military to join the police, despite his useless arm, suspects that he is actually Martin. Salinas questions Teresa, who professes ignorance, but she later persuades her maid, who knows one of the outlaws, to lead her to their hideout. Salinas follows them and is captured by Martin's men, but Martin, who grudingly respects his enemy, sets him free. Martin is both pleased and disturbed to see Teresa, but when she confesses her desire to stay, he kisses her passionately. Two weeks later, Salinas convinces Miguel to request that the militia be called to capture Valverde and his men. Later, Martin and Teresa, who have been living as husband and wife, ask Father Fernandez to marry them, but the priest, outraged by Martin's lawlessness, initially refuses. Father Fernandez does relent, but they are interrupted when they see Salinas and the federal troops ride by on the way to the gauchos' hideout. By the time they reach the camp, Martin and Teresa are horrified to discover that all of their friends have been captured or killed. Martin and Teresa then begin the arduous journey to Chile, where they hope to live safely, but when Teresa reveals that she is pregnant, Martin realizes that she cannot finish the trek through the mountains. Determined to marry Teresa despite the risk of capture, Martin searches for Father Fernandez. The couple finds the priest but when Gomez, Salinas' former sergeant, recognizes them, he calls the police and Teresa is apprehended, although Martin escapes. Father Fernandez apprises Miguel of Teresa's condition, and Miguel informs Teresa that he has arranged for Martin to serve only a three-year jail sentence if he turns himself in voluntarily. Teresa is uncertain, as she fears that Martin's need for freedom will cause him to die in prison, but does reveal his hiding place. Unaware that Salinas is following him, Miguel goes to Martin's hideout, and there tells him that he cannot purchase his freedom at the cost of the lives of Teresa and the baby. Seeing Salinas and his men arrive, Martin rides off, followed by Miguel. The gunshots and confusion start a cattle stampede, and Miguel is killed while trying to help Martin escape. Later, Martin slips into Teresa's room and confesses that he was wrong to cling to the old gaucho ways and now hopes to rectify his mistakes. Martin arranges to meet Teresa at the cathedral the next day, and Father Fernandez also summons Salinas. The priest urges Salinas to prove his strength by being merciful, although Salinas protests that some things cannot be forgiven. When Martin arrives, however, and tells Salinas that he will go with him voluntarily, after he marries Teresa, Salinas allows him to enter the cathedral with his beloved. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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