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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Gypsy Blood and Gone to Earth , the latter of which was also the British release title. The phrase "gone to earth," a fox-hunting term that usually refers to the death of the quarry, is uttered at the end of the picture, when "Hazel" and "Foxy" fall into the mine shaft. Michael Powell's and Emeric Pressburger's onscreen credits reads: "Written, produced and directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger." Although not included in the onscreen credits of the viewed print, Powell and Pressburger's films usually featured the logo of their company, Archershers. Onscreen credits note that the film was "photographed at the actual settings on the Welsh border in Shepperton, England and in Hollywood, California." The opening credits are momentarily interrupted by footage of an English fox hunt. Voice-over narration, spoken by Joseph Cotten, describes the Shropshire countryside and its gypsy customs.
       The picture, which was released first in London on 19 Sep 1950 at a running time of 110 minutes, had a long and complicated history. Contemporary news items add the following information about the production: In Mar 1937 actress Simone Simon announced that she had purchased the rights to Mary Webb's novel Gone to Earth . By Mar 1940, however, the novel was under the control of English producer Alexander Korda, who planned to film the story for United Artists release. Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh were mentioned as possible co-stars at that time. Production on the film did not begin until Jul 1949. Korda and American producer David O. Selznick, who had entered into a producing-distribution ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Gypsy Blood and Gone to Earth , the latter of which was also the British release title. The phrase "gone to earth," a fox-hunting term that usually refers to the death of the quarry, is uttered at the end of the picture, when "Hazel" and "Foxy" fall into the mine shaft. Michael Powell's and Emeric Pressburger's onscreen credits reads: "Written, produced and directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger." Although not included in the onscreen credits of the viewed print, Powell and Pressburger's films usually featured the logo of their company, Archershers. Onscreen credits note that the film was "photographed at the actual settings on the Welsh border in Shepperton, England and in Hollywood, California." The opening credits are momentarily interrupted by footage of an English fox hunt. Voice-over narration, spoken by Joseph Cotten, describes the Shropshire countryside and its gypsy customs.
       The picture, which was released first in London on 19 Sep 1950 at a running time of 110 minutes, had a long and complicated history. Contemporary news items add the following information about the production: In Mar 1937 actress Simone Simon announced that she had purchased the rights to Mary Webb's novel Gone to Earth . By Mar 1940, however, the novel was under the control of English producer Alexander Korda, who planned to film the story for United Artists release. Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh were mentioned as possible co-stars at that time. Production on the film did not begin until Jul 1949. Korda and American producer David O. Selznick, who had entered into a producing-distribution contract in the late 1940s, hired Pressburger and Powell to make the picture, with Jennifer Jones, Selznick's new wife, as the star.
       According to Powell's autobiography, the director tested both James Donald and Paul Scofield for the role of "Edward" before casting Cyril Cusack. In his autobiography, Powell described location shooting in the Shropshire countryside: "We were using only local people for the crowd scenes and small parts....We hired a mothballed aerodrome not far from Shrewsbury, and used the empty hangars like a film studio....We started in Much Wenlock with Jennifer visiting the little market town as if it were Paris....We moved over to Church Stretton and Craven Arms, in the Welsh Marches, and made them our base for a week or two." The county fair scene was shot on the water meadows near Shrewsbury, according to Powell's autobiography.
       In late 1949, after viewing a rough cut of the film in England, Selznick demanded extensive retakes. According to modern sources, Selznick was unhappy with Powell and Pressburger's version because Jones was not on screen enough, and accused the filmmakers of sticking too close to the novel. Selznick, who owned the film's Western hemisphere rights, and Korda, who owned the remaining world rights, disagreed as to who should pick up the cost of the retakes, according to contemporary news items. Modern sources note that in Apr 1950, Selznick's lawyer sought an injunction against Gone to Earth in London but was unsuccessful. According to contemporary news items, in Aug 1950, the producers then entered into arbitration proceedings. Korda demanded that Selznick release £100,000 held in escrow in London, which represented returns on the English distribution of Selznick's 1948 production The Paradine Case (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ), which Selznick had promised Korda in exchange for Gone to Earth . Selznick countered that Korda was not entitled to the money until he had made the requested changes on Gone to Earth .
       Also included in the disputed deal were monies from the distribution of Selznick's 1949 film Portrait of Jennie in England, which Selznick had turned over to Korda in exchange for Gone to Earth , and the U.S. distribution rights to Korda's 1950 film The Third Man (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ). The dispute was settled in Nov 1950, when it was decreed that Selznick was entitled to only three scenes worth of retakes. Modern sources state that the New York judge in the case, Robert P. Patterson, ruled that all of the terms of Selznick and Korda's original contract had essentially been met, and that Selznick could make any changes to Gone to Earth for its Western hemisphere release as he wanted, but had to do so at his own expense.
       Retakes were shot in Hollywood, according to contemporary sources. Modern sources note that Selznick hired Rouben Mamoulian to direct the new footage and reassembled all of the principal actors. According to modern sources, seventy percent of Powell and Pressburger's film was either reshot or dropped. According to information contained in the film's file in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, PCA director Joseph I. Breen deemed a shot version of the picture, viewed in Oct 1950, as unacceptable under the provisions of the Code. Breen complained that, unlike the script that he had approved, the shot film contained too much lovemaking between Jack and Hazel. He also objected to the elimination of the scene in which Hazel speaks remorsefully about her sin, as well as the casting and direction of the scene in which townspeople come to the Marston home to voice their disapproval of Edward and Hazel. Breen stated in a 12 Oct 1950 letter to Selznick that "this scene will need careful editing to remove the present flavor of making the townspeople so unpleasant as to cast the sympathy of the audience against what they are saying." To satisfy Breen, Selznick not only reduced the objectionable lovemaking, reinserted Hazel's remorse speech and changed some of the townspeople's dialogue, he also added dialogue establishing Hazel's pregnancy, as he felt that making her pregnant would "punch up the impossibility of a reconciliation between her and her husband." Breen approved the film in late Nov 1950.
       Although in Sep 1951 HR announced that the film, which was then called Gypsy Blood , would be distributed by Selznick International, Selznick sold the Western hemisphere distribution rights to RKO for $500,000 in Dec 1951. In Jul 1986, a print of the British version of The Wild Heart , newly restored by the National Heritage Memorial Fund, was screened in London.
       Modern sources add the following crew credits: Charles Orme ( Prod asst ); Archie Knowles ( 2d asst dir ); Doreen Francis ( Cont ); Joanna G. Busby ( Asst cont ); Freddie Francis ( Cam op ); Bill Lee ( Focus puller ); George Minassian ( Technicolor tech ); Dick Allport ( Technicolor asst ); W. Percy Day ( Process shots ); Bill Wall ( Chief elec ); Bernard Sarron ( Set dresser ); Maurice Fowler ( Draftsman ); John Cox ( Sd rec ); Peter Butcher ( Boom op ); Charles Earl ( Sd cam op ); P. R. Stephenson ( Sd maintenance ); Julia Squires ( Cost ); Ivy Baker ( Dress supv ); Bill Smith and Michael Hart ( Ward ); Dick Richards and May Walding ( Ward asst ); Jimmy Vining ( Makeup ); Connie Reeves ( Makeup asst ); Betty Cross ( Hair ); Eileen Bates ( Asst hair ); Alec Mozeley ( Puppeteer ); Vivienne Knight ( Pub ); and Bert Cann ( Stills ). In addition, modern sources note that the film's score was performed by the Boyd Neel Orchestra. Modern sources add the following additional cast members: Raymond Rollett ( Landlord/elder ); Gerald Lawson ( Road mender/elder ); Bartlett Mullins and Arthur Reynolds ( Chapel elders ); Ann Tetheradge ( Miss James ); Peter Dunlop ( Cornet player ); Louis Phillip ( Policeman ); and Owen Holder ( Brother minister ). It is possible that some of these actors did not appear in the U.S. version. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 May 1952.
---
Daily Variety
28 May 1952.
---
Film Daily
22 Mar 1937.
---
Film Daily
29 May 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1940.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 49
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 May 52
p. 1382.
New York Times
3 Jul 1949.
---
New York Times
30 Aug 1950.
---
New York Times
29 May 52
p. 17.
Newsweek
9 Jun 1952.
---
Screen International
5 Jul 1986.
---
Time
9 Jun 1952.
---
Variety
30 Aug 1950.
---
Variety
27 Sep 50
p. 8.
Variety
15 Nov 1950.
---
Variety
20 Dec 1951.
---
Variety
4 Jun 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Selznick Picture; A Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Asst prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
PRODUCTION MISC
Animals trained by
Animals trained by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Gone to Earth by Mary Webb (London, 1917).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Mother Dear," "Harps in Heaven" and "For Christ Our Savior," composers undetermined.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Gone to Earth
Gypsy Blood
Release Date:
July 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 28 May 1952
Los Angeles opening: 16 July 1952
Production Date:
began 19 July 1949 in London
Copyright Claimant:
Vanguard Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1764
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
81-82
Length(in feet):
7,370
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15053
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the Welsh border of Shropshire, England, in the late 1800s, beautiful Hazel Woodus lives with her widowed father Abel, a coffin maker and harpist, in a poor hamlet known as God's Little Mountain. In her father's cottage, gentle Hazel cares for Foxy, a young fox she protects from the local hunters, and many other wild animals. To Abel's annoyance, the impressionable Hazel also studies the folklore of her gypsy mother, whose legends include the story of the murderous Black Huntsman. One night, after spending the day in the marketplace, Hazel is on her way home when she hears a carriage approaching from behind. Thinking that the Black Huntsman is after her, she starts to run and stumbles. The driver, Jack Reddin, stops and offers Hazel a ride, and struck by his handsome face and gentlemanly manner, she accepts. Jack, a squire, invites Hazel to spend the night in his manor and tempts her with a trunk full of elegant dresses. As soon as Jack tries to force his attentions on her, however, Hazel bolts outside, where Jack's servant, Andrew Vessons, comes to her aid. Hazel spends the night in the stables, and the next morning Vessons takes her home, promising never to tell Jack where she lives. Later, after Abel complains to Hazel that she is too wild and needs a husband, Hazel swears by her mother's grave that she will marry the first man who comes for her. Jack then begins scouring the countryside for Hazel, but no one will admit to knowing her, and she hides when he inquires about her at the local inn. At a social honoring the arrival ... +


At the Welsh border of Shropshire, England, in the late 1800s, beautiful Hazel Woodus lives with her widowed father Abel, a coffin maker and harpist, in a poor hamlet known as God's Little Mountain. In her father's cottage, gentle Hazel cares for Foxy, a young fox she protects from the local hunters, and many other wild animals. To Abel's annoyance, the impressionable Hazel also studies the folklore of her gypsy mother, whose legends include the story of the murderous Black Huntsman. One night, after spending the day in the marketplace, Hazel is on her way home when she hears a carriage approaching from behind. Thinking that the Black Huntsman is after her, she starts to run and stumbles. The driver, Jack Reddin, stops and offers Hazel a ride, and struck by his handsome face and gentlemanly manner, she accepts. Jack, a squire, invites Hazel to spend the night in his manor and tempts her with a trunk full of elegant dresses. As soon as Jack tries to force his attentions on her, however, Hazel bolts outside, where Jack's servant, Andrew Vessons, comes to her aid. Hazel spends the night in the stables, and the next morning Vessons takes her home, promising never to tell Jack where she lives. Later, after Abel complains to Hazel that she is too wild and needs a husband, Hazel swears by her mother's grave that she will marry the first man who comes for her. Jack then begins scouring the countryside for Hazel, but no one will admit to knowing her, and she hides when he inquires about her at the local inn. At a social honoring the arrival of Edward Marston, the new Baptist reverend, Hazel sings a folk song as Abel accompanies her on the harp. Edward is enchanted by Hazel and invites her to join him and his mother for supper. At the Marstons' cottage, Hazel tells the earnest Edward about her vow, while nearby, Jack continues his fruitless search. As he walks her home, Edward proposes marriage, declaring that he loves her more than she loves Foxy. Hazel is reluctant to respond, but finally accepts, not wanting to break her vow. Later, at the Shropshire County Fair, Hazel appears with Mrs. Marston, dressed in some new clothes that Edward had promised her. Jack, who is participating in a horse jumping competition, spies her and threatens to tell Edward that they spent the night together if she fails to meet him later. During their rendezvous, Jack professes his love and offers to marry Hazel, but she insists that she cannot break her promise, as terrible things might happen. The next day, Hazel and Edward are wed, and Edward, who knows that Hazel does not love him and has vowed to God not to touch her until she does, leaves her to sleep alone. Soon after Edward baptizes Hazel, Jack shows up at the Marstons' cottage, feigning neighborliness. Once alone with Hazel, Jack kisses her and tells her to meet him later. Despite reassuring Edward that she is happy, Hazel consults her mother's folklore book and conducts a test to see if she should go to Jack. When the signs point to going, Hazel finds Jack in the woods and, at the end of the night, rides to his manor. Edward searches frantically for Hazel, until he receives a note from her, assuring him that she is well and asking that he not come for her. Hazel moves in with Jack, but is unhappy in the gloomy manor and becomes hysterical when he viciously throws a baby rabbit she has found to his hunting dog. Edward, meanwhile, learns Hazel's whereabouts from his disapproving mother and rushes to see her. Even after Jack announces that Hazel is pregnant by him, Edward offers to take Hazel back. Hazel returns to her husband, but Mrs. Marston refuses to live with her and moves out. Hazel's guilt increases after several villagers come by to tell Edward that the parish will not tolerate Hazel's presence. Just then, a fox hunt led by Jack passes by, and Hazel realizes that Foxy is outside, unprotected. Although she scoops up Foxy, the dog pack continues the chase, finally cornering her at the edge of an abandoned mine shaft. Hazel and Jack fight over Foxy, and Hazel, still clutching her beloved pet, slips into the shaft and falls to her death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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