Sweethearts on Parade (1953)

90 mins | Musical | 15 July 1953

Director:

Allan Dwan

Writer:

Houston Branch

Cinematographer:

Reggie Lanning

Production Designer:

James Sullivan

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

This film's working title was Sweetheart Time . Allan Dwan and musical director Robert Armbruster had previously made the 1952 Republic musical I Dream of Jeanie (with the Light Brown Hair) (See Entry), with several of the same principal actors. Although studio publicity and the Var review state that the film contained twenty-six songs, only those listed above were heard in the print viewed, which was complete. Although Rex Allen was originally cast in the production, an Aug 1952 HR news item reported that Harry Carey, Jr. replaced him after Allen suffered an eye injury. Allen did, however, provide the singing voice for Carey's character. A HR news item added Dorothy Peters to the cast, but her appearance in the released film has not been ... More Less

This film's working title was Sweetheart Time . Allan Dwan and musical director Robert Armbruster had previously made the 1952 Republic musical I Dream of Jeanie (with the Light Brown Hair) (See Entry), with several of the same principal actors. Although studio publicity and the Var review state that the film contained twenty-six songs, only those listed above were heard in the print viewed, which was complete. Although Rex Allen was originally cast in the production, an Aug 1952 HR news item reported that Harry Carey, Jr. replaced him after Allen suffered an eye injury. Allen did, however, provide the singing voice for Carey's character. A HR news item added Dorothy Peters to the cast, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Aug 1953.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jul 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Jul 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 1952
p. 2, 5.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1952
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 1952
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1952
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1952
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 1953
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jul 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Aug 53
p. 1934.
Variety
29 Jul 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Republic Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward
MUSIC
Music adpt and dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Harry Carey, Jr.
SOURCES
SONGS
"Long Long Ago," music and lyrics by Thomas Haynes Bayly
"Mating Time," music by Johann Strauss, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
"Then You'll Remember Me" from the opera The Bohemian Girl , music by Michael William Balfe, libretto by Alfred Bunn, adapted by Robert Armbruster, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
+
SONGS
"Long Long Ago," music and lyrics by Thomas Haynes Bayly
"Mating Time," music by Johann Strauss, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
"Then You'll Remember Me" from the opera The Bohemian Girl , music by Michael William Balfe, libretto by Alfred Bunn, adapted by Robert Armbruster, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
"A Rovin'," music traditional, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
"Regnava nel silencio" from the opera Lucia di Lammermoor , music by Gaetano Donizetti, libretto by Salvadore Cammorano
"Cindy," traditional
"The Blue Juniata," music and lyrics by Marion Dix Sullivan
"Molly Darlin'," music and lyrics by William Shakespeare Hays
"Ah, So Pure" from the opera Martha, oder Der Markt von Richmond , music by Friedrich von Flotow, libretto by Friedrich Wilhelm Riese, special lyrics by Robert Armbruster
"I Wish I Was Single Again," traditional
"Nelly Bly," music and lyrics by Stephen Collins Foster
"Flow Gently, Sweet Afton," music by James E. Spilman, lyrics by Robert Burns
"Young Love," music by Franz von Suppé, lyrics by Robert Armbruster
"In the Evening by the Moonlight," music and lyrics by James Bland
"Ah non giunge" from the opera La Sonnambula , music by Vincenzo Bellini, libretto by Felice Romani
"Kathleen Mavourneen," music by Frederick William Nichols Crouch, lyrics by Annie Crawford
"Romance," music by Anton Rubinstein, special lyrics by Robert Armbruster and Lucille Norman
"Sweet Genevieve," music by Henry Tucker, lyrics by George Cooper
"Love Is a Pain," traditional, adapted by Robert Armbruster, lyrics by Allan Dwan
"Wanderin'," traditional, special lyrics by Allan Dwan
"You Naughty, Naughty Men," music by G. Bicknell, lyrics by T. Kennick.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sweetheart Time
Release Date:
15 July 1953
Production Date:
31 July--late August 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
22 June 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2843
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor by Consolidated
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16165
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the 1870s, in Kokomo, Indiana, teenager Sylvia Townsend lives with her mother Kathleen, who teaches music to the local children. Kathleen is being courted by Harold Wayne, a doctor, while Harold’s son Tommy is romantically interested in Sylvia. Sylvia, who never knew her real father, tells Kathleen that she would like her to remarry as she feels the need for a father-figure in her life. When alone, Kathleen recalls her life as a young singer: Kathleen appears in a production of The Bohemian Girl and marries fellow performer Cam Ellerby. After Sylvia is born, Cam is unfaithful, so Kathleen leaves him and settles with Sylvia in Kokomo. Kathleen’s reverie is interrupted by the arrival in town of the Ogalla Remedy medicine show. As the wagon pass the Townsend house, Bill Gamble and Jim Riley, two young men with the company, gaze admiringly at Sylvia. Later, when Sylvia, who is an aspiring performer, asks to attend the show, her mother tells her that medicine shows are cheap and common. As the show sets up its theater tent in town, Harold, in his role as public health officer, and Sheriff Doolittle arrive to attempt to run it out of town. However, the show’s proprietor, Cam, is able to appease the sheriff by claiming they are both members of the same brotherhood organization, then introduces Harold to Bill, who is a licenced doctor and has also studied music. Bill admits to Harold that their Ogalla medicine has no medical value, but says that it seems to do people a lot of good. Meanwhile, the show’s female star, Lolita Lamont, and two of the female dancers flirt with the ... +


In the 1870s, in Kokomo, Indiana, teenager Sylvia Townsend lives with her mother Kathleen, who teaches music to the local children. Kathleen is being courted by Harold Wayne, a doctor, while Harold’s son Tommy is romantically interested in Sylvia. Sylvia, who never knew her real father, tells Kathleen that she would like her to remarry as she feels the need for a father-figure in her life. When alone, Kathleen recalls her life as a young singer: Kathleen appears in a production of The Bohemian Girl and marries fellow performer Cam Ellerby. After Sylvia is born, Cam is unfaithful, so Kathleen leaves him and settles with Sylvia in Kokomo. Kathleen’s reverie is interrupted by the arrival in town of the Ogalla Remedy medicine show. As the wagon pass the Townsend house, Bill Gamble and Jim Riley, two young men with the company, gaze admiringly at Sylvia. Later, when Sylvia, who is an aspiring performer, asks to attend the show, her mother tells her that medicine shows are cheap and common. As the show sets up its theater tent in town, Harold, in his role as public health officer, and Sheriff Doolittle arrive to attempt to run it out of town. However, the show’s proprietor, Cam, is able to appease the sheriff by claiming they are both members of the same brotherhood organization, then introduces Harold to Bill, who is a licenced doctor and has also studied music. Bill admits to Harold that their Ogalla medicine has no medical value, but says that it seems to do people a lot of good. Meanwhile, the show’s female star, Lolita Lamont, and two of the female dancers flirt with the sheriff, who allows the show, or “concert” as Cam calls it, to continue. The next day, while walking near the Townsend house, Bill sees Sylvia in the garden and tells her that he is a doctor with an interest in music. Sylvia introduces him to her mother, who is impressed by Bill's singing. Later, while Sylvia is out walking with Bill, Harold visits Kathleen, and upon learning that Sylvia is with the "young whipper-snapper" from the medicine show, sends Tommy to find her. Harold again proposes marriage to Kathleen and faints with happiness when she accepts. Meanwhile, Bill confesses to Sylvia that he is with the show and she asks him to take her backstage, where she meets several members of the company. In the empty theater, Bill accompanies the stage-struck Sylvia as she sings an operatic aria she learned from her mother. When Cam hears Sylvia singing, he is reminded of Kathleen performing the same piece and, disturbed, orders Sylvia to leave. Bill escorts Sylvia home and, although he apologizes to Kathleen for causing her concern, Kathleen later warns her daughter that Bill may cause her great unhappiness. Kathleen then relates that she had been a singer and had married a man then left him when Sylvia was only one month old. Meanwhile, Cam is getting drunk in his wagon, bemoaning his lost love, Kathleen. Lolita, who is in love with Cam, helps him to sober up for the show, but while in a drunken state, he accidentally hurts her. Just as Bill is comforting Lolita, Sylvia arrives, sees them together and assumes that they are sweethearts. Disappointed, she turns to leave, but trips and is knocked unconscious. When Sylvia awakens in Cam’s wagon, he offers kindly, fatherly advice. Kathleen, who has followed Sylvia, then comes face-to-face with Cam, and they are both shocked. After the women leave, a flustered Cam strikes Bill several times and fires him, prompting Lolita to decide to leave the show. Later, when Kathleen and Cam meet privately, Lolita overhears Cam's regret over his womanizing and plea that Kathleen not let Sylvia know her father is a medicine show drunk. After Kathleen tells him that she plans to remarry, Cam asks her to leave. Cam then apologizes to Bill, explaining that Sylvia is his daughter. The next morning, as the wagons prepare to depart, Lolita visits Sylvia and tells her that she was never in love with Bill and was simply trying to make Cam jealous. After informing Sylvia that Bill loves her, Lolita reveals that Cam is Sylvia’s father and advises her to stop her mother from remarrying, as she believes that Kathleen is still in love with Cam. Sylvia then begs her mother to leave with her and the show, and when the wagons pass by the house once again, Cam and Bill are thrilled to see Kathleen and Sylvia waiting to join them.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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