Maryland (1940)

92 mins | Drama | 19 July 1940

Director:

Henry King

Cinematographer:

George Barnes

Editor:

Barbara McLean

Production Designers:

Richard Day, Wiard B. Ihnen

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

According to materials contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Edwin Blum and John Taintor Foote worked on a treatment for the film, and Sonya Levien wrote the original story for it. Their participation in the final film has not been confirmed, however. The film was first conceived as a period piece, taking place from 1864-1884. From the outset, the film was developed as a vehicle for Walter Brennan, whom Fox borrowed from Goldwyn, and as a companion piece to Fox's 1938 film Kentucky (see above). News items in HR note that Fox wanted actor Eddie Anderson, who played Jack Benny's butler Rochester, for a role in the film, but Jack Benny, who had right of refusal for all of Anderson's parts, declined because he wanted him free for the next Benny picture. The race scenes were shot on location in ... More Less

According to materials contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Edwin Blum and John Taintor Foote worked on a treatment for the film, and Sonya Levien wrote the original story for it. Their participation in the final film has not been confirmed, however. The film was first conceived as a period piece, taking place from 1864-1884. From the outset, the film was developed as a vehicle for Walter Brennan, whom Fox borrowed from Goldwyn, and as a companion piece to Fox's 1938 film Kentucky (see above). News items in HR note that Fox wanted actor Eddie Anderson, who played Jack Benny's butler Rochester, for a role in the film, but Jack Benny, who had right of refusal for all of Anderson's parts, declined because he wanted him free for the next Benny picture. The race scenes were shot on location in Maryland. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Jun 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Jul 40
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 40
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 40
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 40
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 40
p. 6.
Motion Picture Daily
2 Jul 40
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Apr 40
p. 62.
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jun 40
pp. 45-48.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Jul 40
p. 32.
New York Times
13 Jul 40
p. 16.
Variety
3 Jul 40
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Assoc photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
Assoc technicolor dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 July 1940
Premiere Information:
Baltimore premiere: 10 June 1940
Production Date:
began mid February 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 July 1940
Copyright Number:
LP10026
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
92
Length(in feet):
8,259
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6085
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charlotte Danfield, a member of an old Maryland family with horse breeding in its blood, orders her entire stable sold after her husband meets his death in a hunting accident. She also forbids her son Lee to ride again, but when the boy remains friendly with Charlotte's old horse trainer, William Stewart, and his granddaugther Linda, Charlotte ships him off to school in Europe to remove him from Maryland's horse-oriented environment. Horses are in Lee's blood, however, so when he returns home a grown man and learns that "Uncle Bill" is grooming "Cavalier" for the Maryland Cup, he eagerly offers to ride the steed. Later, after acquiescing to Charlotte's wish that he not ride, Lee, out of a sense of loyalty to Uncle Bill, defies his mother's will. It looks as if Charlotte will have her way, however, when Uncle Bill's groom, Shadrach Jones, confesses that Cavalier is actually Charlotte's horse, the offspring of a filly that she had ordered him to destroy years earlier. Charlotte takes Bill to court to prevent him from entering the steed in the cup. Luckily for Bill, on the day of the race, Shadrach recants his testimony, and the case is dismissed. Lee speeds to the race field just in time to enter, and as he charges through the course, Charlotte arrives to cheer her son to ... +


Charlotte Danfield, a member of an old Maryland family with horse breeding in its blood, orders her entire stable sold after her husband meets his death in a hunting accident. She also forbids her son Lee to ride again, but when the boy remains friendly with Charlotte's old horse trainer, William Stewart, and his granddaugther Linda, Charlotte ships him off to school in Europe to remove him from Maryland's horse-oriented environment. Horses are in Lee's blood, however, so when he returns home a grown man and learns that "Uncle Bill" is grooming "Cavalier" for the Maryland Cup, he eagerly offers to ride the steed. Later, after acquiescing to Charlotte's wish that he not ride, Lee, out of a sense of loyalty to Uncle Bill, defies his mother's will. It looks as if Charlotte will have her way, however, when Uncle Bill's groom, Shadrach Jones, confesses that Cavalier is actually Charlotte's horse, the offspring of a filly that she had ordered him to destroy years earlier. Charlotte takes Bill to court to prevent him from entering the steed in the cup. Luckily for Bill, on the day of the race, Shadrach recants his testimony, and the case is dismissed. Lee speeds to the race field just in time to enter, and as he charges through the course, Charlotte arrives to cheer her son to victory. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.