Brigadoon (1954)

108 mins | Musical, Romance | 22 October 1954

Director:

Vincente Minnelli

Writer:

Alan Jay Lerner

Producer:

Arthur Freed

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Preston Ames

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The order of the onscreen crew credits differs from that of the cutting continuity deposited with the Copyright Office. Also, the onscreen credits identify Adrienne Fazan as the film editor, but the cutting continuity and reviews list Albert Akst as editor. According to a 26 Feb 1951 DV news item, British producer J. Arthur Rank had sought the rights to the stage musical. Kathryn Grayson and Alec Guinness were originally to co-star with Gene Kelly, according to a 12 May 1952 HR news item, and a 19 Mar 1952 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column noted that David Wayne was under consideration for a role. A 23 Mar 1952 LAT article mentioned Moira Shearer and Donald O'Connor as casting possibilities, and a modern biography of director Vincente Minnelli states that they were considered for the roles of "Fiona Campbell" and "Jeff Douglas," respectively. Minnelli's biography adds that Steve Allen and Bill Hayes were also considered for the role of Jeff. HR news items add that Michael Maule was originally cast in the role of "Charlie Chisholm Dalrymple," and include Jane Fischer, Keith Hitchcock, May McAvoy and Cosmo Sardo in the cast. The appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed, however. Virginia Bosler, who portrayed "Jean Campbell," was the only member of the original Broadway cast of Brigadoon to repeat her role in the film.
       According to pre-production news items and modern sources, M-G-M originally considered shooting the film on location, but Scotland's unpredictable climate and the high cost of overseas production made this unfeasible. In a modern interview, Kelly recalled that he ... More Less

The order of the onscreen crew credits differs from that of the cutting continuity deposited with the Copyright Office. Also, the onscreen credits identify Adrienne Fazan as the film editor, but the cutting continuity and reviews list Albert Akst as editor. According to a 26 Feb 1951 DV news item, British producer J. Arthur Rank had sought the rights to the stage musical. Kathryn Grayson and Alec Guinness were originally to co-star with Gene Kelly, according to a 12 May 1952 HR news item, and a 19 Mar 1952 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column noted that David Wayne was under consideration for a role. A 23 Mar 1952 LAT article mentioned Moira Shearer and Donald O'Connor as casting possibilities, and a modern biography of director Vincente Minnelli states that they were considered for the roles of "Fiona Campbell" and "Jeff Douglas," respectively. Minnelli's biography adds that Steve Allen and Bill Hayes were also considered for the role of Jeff. HR news items add that Michael Maule was originally cast in the role of "Charlie Chisholm Dalrymple," and include Jane Fischer, Keith Hitchcock, May McAvoy and Cosmo Sardo in the cast. The appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed, however. Virginia Bosler, who portrayed "Jean Campbell," was the only member of the original Broadway cast of Brigadoon to repeat her role in the film.
       According to pre-production news items and modern sources, M-G-M originally considered shooting the film on location, but Scotland's unpredictable climate and the high cost of overseas production made this unfeasible. In a modern interview, Kelly recalled that he and producer Arthur Freed traveled to Scotland to scout locations, "but the weather was so bad that we had to agree with the studio. So we came back to the United States and started looking for locations here. We found some highlands above Monterey [in Big Sur] that looked like Scotland. But then the studio had an ecomomy wave, and they clamped the lid on that idea." Brigadoon was filmed entirely on M-G-M's lot in Culver City, using painted backgrounds to represent the hills of Scotland. The picture was Minnelli's first CinemaScope production.
       Brigadoon opened to mixed reviews. Several critics commented on the omission of various songs from the Broadway musical, most notably "Come to Me, Bend to Me" and the "Sword Dance" number performed by "Harry Beaton." The SatRev review praised the director's special technique for enhancing the frenetic atmosphere of the New York bar sequence: "Minnelli has recorded the babble of voices a few frames out of synchronization, making everything sound even madder and more irritating." Brigadoon received Academy Award nominations for Best Art Direction (Color), Best Costume Design (Color) and Best Sound Recording. A modern source credits Carol Haney and Jeanne Coyne as assistant choreographers. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Aug 1954.
---
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1951.
---
Daily Variety
11 Aug 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Aug 54
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 52
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 53
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 53
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 53
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 53
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 54
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 54
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 54
p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Aug 54
p. 105.
New York Times
17 Sep 54
p. 18.
Newsweek
13 Sep 1954.
---
Saturday Review
25 Sep 1954.
---
Screen Stories
Oct 1954.
---
Variety
11 Aug 54
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Courtesy New York City Ballet Company
Peter Hansen
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Choral arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hair styles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Cyd Charisse
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Brigadoon , book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner, music by Frederick Loewe, as presented by Cheryl Crawford (New York, 13 Mar 1947).
MUSIC
"The Gathering of the Clans" and "The Wedding Dance" by Frederick Loewe.
SONGS
"Prologue," "Brigadoon," "MacConnachy Square," "Waitin' for My Dearie," "I'll Go Home with Bonnie Jean," "The Heather on the Hill," "Almost Like Being in Love" and "The Chase," music by Frederick Loewe, lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 October 1954
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 8 September 1954
New York opening: 16 September 1954
Production Date:
9 December 1953--19 March 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
2 September 1954
Copyright Number:
LP4021
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Ansco
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
print by Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
108
Length(in feet):
9,705
Length(in reels):
16
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16971
SYNOPSIS

In the misty Highlands of Scotland, New Yorkers Tommy Albright and Jeff Douglas get lost on the first day of their grouse hunting trip, just as the inhabitants of the tiny village of Brigadoon awaken with the dawn and gather in the square for a lively fair. When the mist clears, the friends notice the village, which is not on their map, and head toward it in search of food. Tommy and Jeff approach Brigadoon and encounter Fiona Campbell, who is preparing for her younger sister Jean's wedding to Charlie Chisholm Dalrymple. Tommy is instantly spellbound by the lovely Fiona, who directs them to the village square. The villagers freeze in apprehension at the sight of the strangers, and when Tommy attempts to buy some milk, the vendor rejects his shilling after marveling at the date on it. However, Charlie is in a bountiful mood and buys them breakfast, and Tommy and Jeff join the villagers as they toast the end of Charlie's bachelor days. Fiona comes to the fair, and Tommy tags along as she completes her errands. Meanwhile, Harry Beaton, Jean's rejected suitor, bitterly tells her father Andrew that his life means less than nothing to him now, adding that he hates everything and everybody in the "cursed town." Tommy and Fiona go to the far hills to pick heather for the wedding, but when they approach a bridge at the edge of Brigadoon's boundaries, Fiona panics and runs away. Tommy, now giddy with love, encounters Jeff on the road and insists that they stay around for the wedding. On the window ledge outside the Campbell home, they find the family Bible that Charlie had signed earlier, ... +


In the misty Highlands of Scotland, New Yorkers Tommy Albright and Jeff Douglas get lost on the first day of their grouse hunting trip, just as the inhabitants of the tiny village of Brigadoon awaken with the dawn and gather in the square for a lively fair. When the mist clears, the friends notice the village, which is not on their map, and head toward it in search of food. Tommy and Jeff approach Brigadoon and encounter Fiona Campbell, who is preparing for her younger sister Jean's wedding to Charlie Chisholm Dalrymple. Tommy is instantly spellbound by the lovely Fiona, who directs them to the village square. The villagers freeze in apprehension at the sight of the strangers, and when Tommy attempts to buy some milk, the vendor rejects his shilling after marveling at the date on it. However, Charlie is in a bountiful mood and buys them breakfast, and Tommy and Jeff join the villagers as they toast the end of Charlie's bachelor days. Fiona comes to the fair, and Tommy tags along as she completes her errands. Meanwhile, Harry Beaton, Jean's rejected suitor, bitterly tells her father Andrew that his life means less than nothing to him now, adding that he hates everything and everybody in the "cursed town." Tommy and Fiona go to the far hills to pick heather for the wedding, but when they approach a bridge at the edge of Brigadoon's boundaries, Fiona panics and runs away. Tommy, now giddy with love, encounters Jeff on the road and insists that they stay around for the wedding. On the window ledge outside the Campbell home, they find the family Bible that Charlie had signed earlier, and Tommy is bewildered when he looks at the entries and sees that Fiona was born in 1732, and that Charlie has entered the date of his wedding to Jean as 1754. Jeff is unimpressed, but the perplexed Tommy confronts Fiona and asks for an explanation. Fiona reluctantly agrees to take them to see the schoolmaster, Mr. Lundie, who tells them of the "miracle" that happened in Brigadoon: Two hundred years ago, the Highlands were plagued with sorcerers who were turning people away from God's teaching. To protect the people from outside influences, the village minister asked God to make Brigadoon and its inhabitants vanish into the Highland mist and awaken for one day every one hundred years. Lundie adds that as part of the minister's contract with God, if anyone from the village leaves, the enchantment will be broken for all, and Brigadoon will disappear forever. Tommy asks if it is possible for an outsider to stay, and Lundie replies that it is, provided he loves someone in Brigadoon deeply enough. Later, everyone in Brigadoon gathers for the wedding, but the festivities take an ugly turn when Harry tries to kiss Jean, then pulls a knife on Charlie. Harry is quickly subdued, but announces that he is leaving Brigadoon and flees. The men from the village quickly form search parties to go after him, and Tommy joins in the effort. Harry fights off his pursuers, but while hiding in a tree, is accidentally shot to death by Jeff, who is aiming at a grouse. The men assume that Harry fell and hit his head, and agree to keep his death a secret until morning, to avoid casting a pall on the wedding celebration. Tommy passionately tells Fiona he cannot leave her, then informs the drunken Jeff that he plans to stay in Brigadoon with Fiona. Jeff admits that he killed Harry and angrily tells Tommy he does not really belong in Brigadoon. Fiona arrives with Lundie, and Tommy, shaken by Jeff's words, apologetically changes his mind. With the day almost at an end, Tommy and Fiona say goodbye, and as he walks away in anguish, a cloud of mist envelops Brigadoon. Four months later, in a crowded, noisy New York bar, Tommy tells Jeff, who has been drinking heavily since returning from Scotland, that he is still in love with Fiona and has been avoiding his fiancée, Jane Ashton. At dinner that evening, Tommy, consumed with thoughts of Brigadoon, abruptly breaks the engagement and calls Jeff, instructing him to make plane reservations for Scotland right away. In Scotland, Tommy and Jeff return to the place where Brigadoon once stood. As Tommy mourns his lost love, the village suddenly emerges from the mist. Lundie beckons Tommy, reminding him that if you love someone deeply enough, anything is possible--even miracles. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.