The Bottom of the Bottle (1956)

88 mins | Drama | January 1956

Director:

Henry Hathaway

Writer:

Sidney Boehm

Producer:

Buddy Adler

Cinematographer:

Lee Garmes

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Maurice Ransford

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Other Man . Actor Pedro Gonzalez Gonzalez, who was frequently billed as Gonzalez Gonzalez, was listed in the onscreen credits as "Gonzales-Gonzales." According to a May 1955 DV news item, Gregory Peck was considered for a lead role. Studio publicity contained in the film's production files at the AMPAS Library notes that many of the river scenes were shot on location at the Santa Cruz River on the Arizona/Mexico border. The Var review mistakenly spells actor Orlando Beltran's name as ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Other Man . Actor Pedro Gonzalez Gonzalez, who was frequently billed as Gonzalez Gonzalez, was listed in the onscreen credits as "Gonzales-Gonzales." According to a May 1955 DV news item, Gregory Peck was considered for a lead role. Studio publicity contained in the film's production files at the AMPAS Library notes that many of the river scenes were shot on location at the Santa Cruz River on the Arizona/Mexico border. The Var review mistakenly spells actor Orlando Beltran's name as "Beltram." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Feb 1956.
---
Daily Variety
10 May 1955.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jan 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Jan 56
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 55
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 55
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 55
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 55
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 56
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Feb 56
p. 769.
New York Times
2 Feb 56
p. 19.
Variety
1 Feb 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styling
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec asst to prod
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel La Fond de la bouteille by Georges Simenon (Paris, 1949).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Other Man
Release Date:
January 1956
Production Date:
late September--4 November 1955
addl scenes 21 November--23 November 1955
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 January 1956
Copyright Number:
LP6117
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
88
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17726
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As a storm rages in the border town of Nogales, Arizona, sending the Santa Cruz River surging over its banks, lawyer-cum rancher Pat "P.M." Martin arrives at his palatial spread to find his fugitive brother Donald waiting for him. Donald, who has just escaped from prison in Illinois, is desperate to reach his wife Mildred and three children across the border in Mexico, and implores his brother to help him. The prosperous P.M., who holds his misfit brother in contempt, states that the river is impassable. Soon after, P.M.'s wife Nora comes home with the Breckenridges, Millers and Cadys, her inebriated, rich rancher friends, and embarrassed by his brother, P.M. introduces Donald as Eric Bell, an old childhood companion. The next day, Lil Breckenridge finds P.M. staring at the river's edge and insists that he bring his friend to a party at her ranch that night. Worried that his brother, a former alcoholic, will fall off the wagon, P.M. warns her that "Eric" is mentally unbalanced and therefore unable to drink. Liz, intrigued, returns home to spread the news that "Eric" is a time bomb who may entertain them by exploding. Nora, unaware that Donald is her husband's brother, questions him about P.M.'s childhood, and Donald speaks of P.M. with a mixture of admiration and respect. Later, Nora confides that she drinks to compensate for her unhappy marriage, which is filled with material possessions but devoid of children and genuine feeling. At the Breckenridges' party that evening, Donald disappoints the crowd by sticking to ginger ale. After Donald and P.M.'s sister Emily phones from Denver with news that Mildred is in trouble, ... +


As a storm rages in the border town of Nogales, Arizona, sending the Santa Cruz River surging over its banks, lawyer-cum rancher Pat "P.M." Martin arrives at his palatial spread to find his fugitive brother Donald waiting for him. Donald, who has just escaped from prison in Illinois, is desperate to reach his wife Mildred and three children across the border in Mexico, and implores his brother to help him. The prosperous P.M., who holds his misfit brother in contempt, states that the river is impassable. Soon after, P.M.'s wife Nora comes home with the Breckenridges, Millers and Cadys, her inebriated, rich rancher friends, and embarrassed by his brother, P.M. introduces Donald as Eric Bell, an old childhood companion. The next day, Lil Breckenridge finds P.M. staring at the river's edge and insists that he bring his friend to a party at her ranch that night. Worried that his brother, a former alcoholic, will fall off the wagon, P.M. warns her that "Eric" is mentally unbalanced and therefore unable to drink. Liz, intrigued, returns home to spread the news that "Eric" is a time bomb who may entertain them by exploding. Nora, unaware that Donald is her husband's brother, questions him about P.M.'s childhood, and Donald speaks of P.M. with a mixture of admiration and respect. Later, Nora confides that she drinks to compensate for her unhappy marriage, which is filled with material possessions but devoid of children and genuine feeling. At the Breckenridges' party that evening, Donald disappoints the crowd by sticking to ginger ale. After Donald and P.M.'s sister Emily phones from Denver with news that Mildred is in trouble, Donald insists on contacting his wife, and the brothers return to P.M.'s ranch to place the phone call. When Donald discovers that Mildred is destitute and unable to pay the rent and his son has been forced to shine shoes on the streets, Donald slams down the phone and pours himself a stiff drink. P.M. refuses to risk his reputation by helping his sister-in-law, and Donald, seething with resentment, recalls five years earlier, when P.M. was too busy to come to his aid after he was charged with murder while acting in self-defense, then sarcastically congratulates his brother for becoming a "gutless success." When Donald threatens to ask P.M.'s friends for money, the brothers argue and Donald slams P.M. to the floor and then runs out of the house, bottle in hand. Later, several border patrolmen find Donald drunkenly clinging to the river bank and take him to the Breckenridge party, where he becomes belligerent. Nora, worried about P.M., returns home and Hal Breckenridge, concerned that Donald may have harmed P.M., tries to detain him at the ranch. Crazed and paranoid, Donald lashes out at Hal with a fireplace poker and then flees. At the Martin ranch, Nora questions P.M. about his relationship with Donald, and he finally confesses that Donald is his escaped convict brother. Upon learning of Donald's desperate circumstances, Nora insists on helping him and his family, but P.M. worries that he will be charged with aiding and abetting a felon. Retorting that Mildred's welfare is more important than P.M.'s reputation, Nora calls a friend across the border to pay the overdue rent. P.M. then scours the countryside for his missing brother, and returns with the information that Mildred has received the money and that the river will soon recede. Still angry, Nora recriminates P.M. for never allowing her to have children, but he ignores her and goes to bed. Soon after, Luis Romero, a poor Mexican farmer whom P.M. has helped, comes to the ranch with news that Donald has broken into a store and stolen a gun and liquor, and that the border patrol has been notified. As Hal and his bloodthirsty friends form a posse to hunt down Donald, Nora implores P.M. to help his brother. Finally accepting that he is his "brother's keeper," P.M. reconciles with Nora and then rides with Luis in search of Donald. After Luis tracks Donald into the hills, P.M. insists on continuing on alone and Luis tells him the safest place to cross the river. Donald is at first wary of his brother's motives until P.M. declares that he would like to meet Donald's children one day. As Hal's dogs bay in the distance, the brothers mount their horses and plunge into the raging water. Donald makes it safely to the other side, but when P.M. is knocked off his horse, he returns and risks his own life to save his brother. After the brothers reconcile, the posse arrives and Donald surrenders. Although Donald asserts that P.M. was just acting as his lawyer, P.M., no longer ashamed, proudly proclaims that Donald is his brother. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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