Rainbow over Broadway (1933)

62 or 72 mins | Musical comedy | 1 December 1933

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HISTORY

Grace Hayes was a vaudeville headliner. In this film, she portrays a "Mae West type of entertainer," according to FD . Var noted that the "budget looks to be above Chesterfield and states rights ... More Less

Grace Hayes was a vaudeville headliner. In this film, she portrays a "Mae West type of entertainer," according to FD . Var noted that the "budget looks to be above Chesterfield and states rights average." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Dec 33
p. 12.
Harrison's Reports
30 Dec 33
p. 207.
Variety
26 Dec 33
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Adpt and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
DANCE
Ensembles by
SOURCES
SONGS
"There Ain't No Substitute for Love," "Look Up, Not Down" and "I Must Be in Love with Love," words by Elizabeth Morgan, music by Albert Von Tilzer
"Let's Go Places and Do Things," words by Harry MacPherson, music by Albert Von Tilzer
"Dance My Blues Away," words by Neville Fleeson, music by Albert Von Tilzer
+
SONGS
"There Ain't No Substitute for Love," "Look Up, Not Down" and "I Must Be in Love with Love," words by Elizabeth Morgan, music by Albert Von Tilzer
"Let's Go Places and Do Things," words by Harry MacPherson, music by Albert Von Tilzer
"Dance My Blues Away," words by Neville Fleeson, music by Albert Von Tilzer
"While I'm in the Mood," words by George Whiting, music by Albert Von Tilzer.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 December 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Chesterfield Motion Picture Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 November 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4279
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62 or 72
Length(in feet):
6,499
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On his way back from California to New York, orchestra leader Don Hayes visits Kansas City, his hometown, and finds his old sweetheart, Judy Chibbins, performing songs with her brother Bob in the sheet music department of a five-and-ten-cents store. Hoping that he will be interested in the songs she and Bob wrote, Judy invites Don to dinner at their home. At the Chibbins home, however, a feud is going on between the children from Judy's father Timothy's first marriage, Judy, Bob and their younger brother Mickey, and their stepmother, former Broadway star Trixie Valleron, and her daughter Nellie. Because Timothy, a former inventor, has given in to Trixie's extravagant whims, Judy and Bob have had to quit college. Mickey and Timothy have been made to do housework, while Nellie practices ballet and Trixie lounges in bed. Although Judy and Bob try to keep Trixie from meeting Don, Trixie interrupts their performance of their songs and gives an old-fashioned rendition of one of them. When Judy learns that Don, who has discovered he is still in love with her, is more impressed with Trixie's singing than the songs, she angrily tells him to leave. In New York, Sanfield, the owner of the exclusive club where Don's band plays, longs for a singer with something "different." After convincing him that Trixie, dressed in gay nineties' fashion, could be just what he is looking for, Don pays for the whole family to come to New York. Because they know that Trixie will not sing their songs, Judy and Bob ask Don to tell Trixie that their songs are by other songwriters. On the day of ... +


On his way back from California to New York, orchestra leader Don Hayes visits Kansas City, his hometown, and finds his old sweetheart, Judy Chibbins, performing songs with her brother Bob in the sheet music department of a five-and-ten-cents store. Hoping that he will be interested in the songs she and Bob wrote, Judy invites Don to dinner at their home. At the Chibbins home, however, a feud is going on between the children from Judy's father Timothy's first marriage, Judy, Bob and their younger brother Mickey, and their stepmother, former Broadway star Trixie Valleron, and her daughter Nellie. Because Timothy, a former inventor, has given in to Trixie's extravagant whims, Judy and Bob have had to quit college. Mickey and Timothy have been made to do housework, while Nellie practices ballet and Trixie lounges in bed. Although Judy and Bob try to keep Trixie from meeting Don, Trixie interrupts their performance of their songs and gives an old-fashioned rendition of one of them. When Judy learns that Don, who has discovered he is still in love with her, is more impressed with Trixie's singing than the songs, she angrily tells him to leave. In New York, Sanfield, the owner of the exclusive club where Don's band plays, longs for a singer with something "different." After convincing him that Trixie, dressed in gay nineties' fashion, could be just what he is looking for, Don pays for the whole family to come to New York. Because they know that Trixie will not sing their songs, Judy and Bob ask Don to tell Trixie that their songs are by other songwriters. On the day of her opening, Trixie visits her old friend Queenie, who, jealous of Trixie's opportunity, talks down the club and convinces Trixie that it would be beneath her to perform there. However, just before the show begins, Queenie's husband Bowers comes home and tells Trixie that the club has a reputation for making stars of its performers. Despite a black eye Trixie gets from fighting with Queenie, she is a hit, but when she learns that Judy and Bob really wrote the songs, she refuses to sing any more. Sanfield, however, pushes her onstage, and her performing instincts take over. After a producer in the audience hires Judy and Bob to write his next show, Judy reconciles with Trixie and plans to marry Don. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.