Tip on a Dead Jockey (1957)

98-99 mins | Drama | August 1957

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Writer:

Charles Lederer

Producer:

Edwin H. Knopf

Cinematographer:

George Folsey

Editor:

Ben Lewis

Production Designers:

William A. Horning, Hans Peter

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title for the film was The 32nd Day . According to a 23 Mar 1954 DV article, the short story “Tip On a Dead Jockey” was purchased by M-G-M subsequent to being published in the New Yorker that year. Originally slated to be produced in 1955, an Oct 1956 HR news item notes that Orson Welles was signed to direct the film; however, he was later replaced by Richard Thorpe. Tip on a Dead Jockey marked the final film for producer Edwin H. Knopf, who left M-G-M that year. Portions of the film were shot on location in Madrid, ... More Less

The working title for the film was The 32nd Day . According to a 23 Mar 1954 DV article, the short story “Tip On a Dead Jockey” was purchased by M-G-M subsequent to being published in the New Yorker that year. Originally slated to be produced in 1955, an Oct 1956 HR news item notes that Orson Welles was signed to direct the film; however, he was later replaced by Richard Thorpe. Tip on a Dead Jockey marked the final film for producer Edwin H. Knopf, who left M-G-M that year. Portions of the film were shot on location in Madrid, Spain. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Aug 1957.
---
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1954.
---
Daily Variety
14 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Aug 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 1956
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 1956
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1956
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 1957
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 1957
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 1957
p. 53.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 1957
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 1957
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1957
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1957
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
29 Aug 1957.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Aug 1957
p. 489.
New York Times
7 Sep 1957
p. 12.
New Yorker
14 Sep 1957.
---
Showman's Trade Review
17 Aug 1957.
---
Variety
14 Aug 1957
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns for Miss Malone by
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd ed
Sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Tip On a Dead Jockey" by Irwin Shaw in New Yorker (6 Mar 1954).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"You Found Me and I Found You," music and lyrics by Jerome Kern and P. G. Wodehouse.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The 32nd Day
Release Date:
August 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 6 September 1957
Production Date:
late February--late March 1957 in the M-G-M studios
early April--24 April 1957 in Madrid, Spain
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 July 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8685
Physical Properties:
Sound
Perspecta Sound; Westrex Recording System
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
process lenses by Panavision
Duration(in mins):
98-99
Length(in feet):
8,854
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18566
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Only one month after being discharged from U.S. Air force duty in the Korean War, distinguished pilot Lloyd Tredman sends his wife Phyllis a letter from Madrid requesting a divorce. Discovering that she has no grounds for divorce without alleging misconduct, Phyllis decides to fly to Madrid to find out if Lloyd is having an affair. At the Villa Del Oro in Madrid, the unemployed Lloyd is wasting the last of his money drinking and gambling with a permanent houseguest named Toto del Oro. His war buddy Jimmy Heldon lives next-door with wife Paquita, who regularly warns Lloyd that his behavior is self-destructive. Lloyd, taken with her motherly concern, believes he is smitten with Paquita. When he is finally offered a job as a stunt pilot, Lloyd, afraid to return to flying, refuses. Later that day, Phyllis arrives at the apartment and allows Lloyd to believe that the divorce is complete. When she asks why he sought divorce, Lloyd explains that as part of his war duty, he assigned men to fly dangerous missions from which he knew few would return alive. The apathy caused by the duty made him unworthy of any relationship. Soon after, businessman Bert Smith piques Lloyd’s interest with an offer of $25,000 for a proposition and then claims he must know Lloyd better before he reveals the details. The next day at the racetrack, Lloyd is about to bet his last thousand dollars on a horse, when Smith divulges that he wants him to smuggle illicit currency from Cairo, Egypt to Madrid by plane. The plan is to fly from Cairo to a small desert strip, where he will pick up a box carrying ... +


Only one month after being discharged from U.S. Air force duty in the Korean War, distinguished pilot Lloyd Tredman sends his wife Phyllis a letter from Madrid requesting a divorce. Discovering that she has no grounds for divorce without alleging misconduct, Phyllis decides to fly to Madrid to find out if Lloyd is having an affair. At the Villa Del Oro in Madrid, the unemployed Lloyd is wasting the last of his money drinking and gambling with a permanent houseguest named Toto del Oro. His war buddy Jimmy Heldon lives next-door with wife Paquita, who regularly warns Lloyd that his behavior is self-destructive. Lloyd, taken with her motherly concern, believes he is smitten with Paquita. When he is finally offered a job as a stunt pilot, Lloyd, afraid to return to flying, refuses. Later that day, Phyllis arrives at the apartment and allows Lloyd to believe that the divorce is complete. When she asks why he sought divorce, Lloyd explains that as part of his war duty, he assigned men to fly dangerous missions from which he knew few would return alive. The apathy caused by the duty made him unworthy of any relationship. Soon after, businessman Bert Smith piques Lloyd’s interest with an offer of $25,000 for a proposition and then claims he must know Lloyd better before he reveals the details. The next day at the racetrack, Lloyd is about to bet his last thousand dollars on a horse, when Smith divulges that he wants him to smuggle illicit currency from Cairo, Egypt to Madrid by plane. The plan is to fly from Cairo to a small desert strip, where he will pick up a box carrying the contraband. After reporting a failure in landing gear, the plane then will detour over a private field, where Lloyd will push the box out of the plane to be picked up by Smith. Lloyd suggests that his decision rests on the outcome of the race and returns to the track, where he watches as his jockey Alfredo is thrown and killed. When Lloyd, suspecting foul play, then vehemently rejects Smith’s proposition, Jimmy offers to take the job, insinuating that Lloyd is too afraid to accept it. To help solve Lloyd’s financial trouble, Phyllis offers to rent his villa and allow him and Toto to remain as houseguests during her extended stay in Madrid. Later that evening, Phyllis is trying to ease Lloyd’s restlessness with tender memories of their earlier romance when Jimmy arrives to wish them goodbye. Guilt-ridden that he is unable to stop his friend, Lloyd decides to move out of the apartment. When Jimmy fails to return on time, Toto finds Lloyd at a run-down hotel and begs him to help Paquita find the lost pilot. Paquita is horrified to learn that the job involved smuggling and blames Lloyd for her husband’s disappearance and orders him out of her life. Upon Lloyd’s return to Villa Del Oro, Phyllis admits that their divorce was not final and tells him he is a coward who fears responsibility. She accuses him of pursuing the one woman he cannot have, his best friend’s wife, and then letting Jimmy “get rid of himself” by going on the mission. Lloyd is about to explode with rage when Jimmy suddenly returns, having been ordered by Smith to do only a test run. Paquita, overjoyed by her husband’s return, apologizes to Lloyd. When Jimmy reveals his inexperience while describing the run later that evening, Lloyd grows concerned and offers to go in his stead, but Jimmy insists that Lloyd is incapable of flying. Unable to stop Jimmy with explanations, Lloyd resorts to knocking his friend out, then admits to Phyllis that she was right and leaves to finish the mission. The next morning at the airstrip, Lloyd, accompanied by the loyal Toto, is temporarily paralyzed by his fear of flying, but as the plane nears the end of the runway, he gains his confidence and clears the ground. When the plane’s propeller is damaged while picking up the box, the repairs put them several hours behind schedule, alerting air control officials ahead that they have made a stop. When Lloyd and Toto arrive in Cantania, Sicily for refueling, two officials note the irregularity in their flight plan and ask them to wait. Under the pretense of moving the plane for repairs, Lloyd and Toto take off and narrowly escape. Familiar with the flight regulations, Lloyd explains to Toto that Interpol, or international police, will alert sixteen different countries ensuring that when they land, they will be arrested. Knowing that they do not have enough fuel to return to Madrid, Lloyd chooses to stop at a small airport in Ajaccio, Corsica to refuel. When officials approach the plane, Lloyd and Toto return to the air, where a military pursuit plane begins following them. After Lloyd lands in a nearby field, however, the pursuer is forced to fly on. Spotting an approaching military jeep, Lloyd decides to hide the money in the nose of the plane, but discovers the contraband also contains drugs. Knowing the drug smuggling will carry a much higher penalty, Lloyd and Toto quickly take off again. Lloyd then radios the Madrid narcotics department and reports his cargo. When they fly over the designated spot and drop the box with a parachute, Smith, his chauffer Felipe and the Egyptian client, Mr. El Fuad, rush to open it. After Smith shoots El Fuad to take the money and drugs for himself, the police arrive and arrest him and Felipe. Later, customs bureau captain Manello thanks Lloyd and absolves him of any wrongdoing. Lloyd returns to Villa Del Oro, where Phyllis is dressed in sexy lingerie to seduce him. Lloyd feigns exhaustion, but when he returns from his bedroom with his belongings and deposits them in her bedroom, Phyllis rushes to their bed. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.