The Man from the Alamo (1953)

79 mins | Western | August 1953

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HISTORY

According to an Oct 1951 Var news item, John Ford and John Wayne protested Universal's use of the word "Alamo" in the title, noting that they had already registered the title The Alamo . After the matter went to arbitration, however, Wayne and Ford conceded that they had no exclusive right to the word "Alamo." The same item announced that Jeff Chandler was being considered for the starring role in the film.
       According to a Sep 1952 HR news item, Glenn Ford suffered three broken ribs during production when he was thrown against a tree by a horse. Filming was suspended for approximately five weeks. Studio publicity materials note that Francis the Talking Mule, for whom Chill Wills provided the voice in the "Francis" film series, was to have a cameo in The Man from the Alamo, but was replaced by the mule's stand-in, Jed. Some scenes were shot on location at the Agoura Ranch in Agoura, ... More Less

According to an Oct 1951 Var news item, John Ford and John Wayne protested Universal's use of the word "Alamo" in the title, noting that they had already registered the title The Alamo . After the matter went to arbitration, however, Wayne and Ford conceded that they had no exclusive right to the word "Alamo." The same item announced that Jeff Chandler was being considered for the starring role in the film.
       According to a Sep 1952 HR news item, Glenn Ford suffered three broken ribs during production when he was thrown against a tree by a horse. Filming was suspended for approximately five weeks. Studio publicity materials note that Francis the Talking Mule, for whom Chill Wills provided the voice in the "Francis" film series, was to have a cameo in The Man from the Alamo, but was replaced by the mule's stand-in, Jed. Some scenes were shot on location at the Agoura Ranch in Agoura, CA. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Jul 1953.
---
Daily Variety
10 Jul 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Jul 53
p. 10.
Harrison's Reports
11 Jul 53
p. 111.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 52
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 52
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 52
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 52
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1952
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 52
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 53
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Jul 53
p. 1918.
New York Times
12 Sep 53
p. 13.
The Exhibitor
15 Jul 53
p. 3560.
Variety
31 Oct 1951.
---
Variety
15 Jul 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Technicolor tech
Technicolor tech
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1953
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 7 August 1953
Production Date:
25 August--mid September 1952
late October 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co.
Copyright Date:
8 May 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2848
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,134
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16344
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1836, following the election of General Santa Anna to the Mexican presidency, the people of the free state of Texas find themselves faced with the unhappy prospect of a military rule by the new Mexican government. Leading the opposition to the new regime is General Sam Houston, who believes that a military force should be assembled to protect Texas' status as an independent republic. When word reaches Houston that Santa Anna has occupied San Antonio, and that Lt. Col. Travis, with only two hundred soldiers, has retreated across the Sabine River to the Alamo, he quickly assembles a militia. As the battle to save the Alamo rages on, a group of soldiers from Ox Bow, fearing for the safety of their families, draw lots and select John Stroud as the man to go back to the town to protect the women and children. Stroud reaches Ox Bow in the aftermath of a bloody massacre, and finds that his wife and son are among the dead. When the sole survivor of the massacre, a young Mexican boy named Carlos, tells Stroud that the killings were carried out by white men disguised as Mexicans, Stroud vows to hunt down the killers. Meanwhile, the Alamo has fallen into the hands of the Mexicans, who are now poised to charge across Texas. Under the leadership of Lt. Tom Lamar, the women, elderly and children of Franklin, Texas are evacuated. Stroud arrives in Franklin during the evacuation, and leaves Carlos in the care of one of the evacuees, Beth Anders. When Lamar recognizes Stroud as the man who left the Alamo before its fall, the entire town surrounds and taunts ... +


In 1836, following the election of General Santa Anna to the Mexican presidency, the people of the free state of Texas find themselves faced with the unhappy prospect of a military rule by the new Mexican government. Leading the opposition to the new regime is General Sam Houston, who believes that a military force should be assembled to protect Texas' status as an independent republic. When word reaches Houston that Santa Anna has occupied San Antonio, and that Lt. Col. Travis, with only two hundred soldiers, has retreated across the Sabine River to the Alamo, he quickly assembles a militia. As the battle to save the Alamo rages on, a group of soldiers from Ox Bow, fearing for the safety of their families, draw lots and select John Stroud as the man to go back to the town to protect the women and children. Stroud reaches Ox Bow in the aftermath of a bloody massacre, and finds that his wife and son are among the dead. When the sole survivor of the massacre, a young Mexican boy named Carlos, tells Stroud that the killings were carried out by white men disguised as Mexicans, Stroud vows to hunt down the killers. Meanwhile, the Alamo has fallen into the hands of the Mexicans, who are now poised to charge across Texas. Under the leadership of Lt. Tom Lamar, the women, elderly and children of Franklin, Texas are evacuated. Stroud arrives in Franklin during the evacuation, and leaves Carlos in the care of one of the evacuees, Beth Anders. When Lamar recognizes Stroud as the man who left the Alamo before its fall, the entire town surrounds and taunts him. Just as Stroud is about to leave Franklin, Carlos tells him that a drunken man leaving the saloon is one of the men who massacred the people at Ox Bow. Stroud tries to approach the man, but the townspeople warn him to leave and attempt to lynch him. Jailed for his own protection, Stroud shares a cell with Dawes, a member of a renegade gang supporting the Mexicans. Hoping to infiltrate the gang, Stroud expresses his interest in its cause, and when gang leader Jess Wade breaks Dawes out of jail, Stroud goes with him. Wade later decides to go after the wagon train for its bankroll, and accepts Stroud as one of the gang. While waiting in a gorge, ready to ambush the wagon train as it passes, Stroud fires his gun at one of the gang members, Cobby, in a deliberate attempt to warn the approaching wagon train of the impending raid. Stroud's plan works, and the shots send the wagons scurrying for safety. Wounded in a gun battle with Wade and left behind to die, Stroud is found by Carlos and is brought back to the wagon train. There, Beth, the only person who believes that he was not a part of the renegade gang, nurses him back to health. Stroud makes a full recovery, and when Lamar receives orders from Houston to report his regiment to San Jacinto for the final assault on the Mexican army, Stroud is appointed the new leader of the wagon train. Stroud steers the wagon train southward and, after outrunning Wade's gang, sets a trap for them. As Wade's gang approaches, the old men and women of the wagon train, fully armed, defeat them in a fierce gun battle. After killing Wade in a hand-to-hand fight and avenging the murder of his family, Stroud leaves the wagon train to join Houston at San Jacinto. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.