The First Hundred Years (1938)

70, 73 or 75 mins | Comedy-drama | 12 March 1938

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Writer:

Melville Baker

Producer:

Norman Krasna

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Working titles of this film included Turnabout and Wooden Wedding . According to a news item in HR , Robert Montgomery appeared on M-G-M's Good News radio program on 10 Mar 1938, recreating scenes from the ... More Less

Working titles of this film included Turnabout and Wooden Wedding . According to a news item in HR , Robert Montgomery appeared on M-G-M's Good News radio program on 10 Mar 1938, recreating scenes from the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Mar 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Feb 38
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 38
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 38
p. 37.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 38
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 38
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Mar 38
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
10 Mar 38
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Mar 38
pp. 42-43.
New York Times
13 May 38
p. 17.
Variety
16 Mar 38
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
Boom man
PRODUCTION MISC
Props
SOURCES
SONGS
"Misunderstood," words and music by Bob Wright and Chet Forrest
"Put on Your Old Grey Bonnet," words and music by Stanley Murphy and Percy Wenrich.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Turnabout
Wooden Wedding
Release Date:
12 March 1938
Production Date:
17 January--12 February 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 March 1938
Copyright Number:
LP7893
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70, 73 or 75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4116
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

David Conway and his wife Lynn, happily married for five years, owe their affluent New York lifestyle more to Lynn's salary as a successful literary and theatrical agent than David's as a ship designer. When David learns that he soon will be in charge of a shipyard in New Bedford, he assumes that Lynn will quit her job and be content to live on his salary, but she feels that her work is just as important as his. They argue, then make-up, but each incorrectly assumes that the other has changed position. When Lynn suggests that they each keep their jobs and get together on weekends, David realizes that she will not give up her work and leaves. Though she is very upset, her boss, Harry Borden, tells her to "out bluff" David by going on an assignment for a few days in Hollywood. Meanwhile, Harry's lawyer, Samuel Z. Walker, and David's lawyer, William Regan, discuss terms of the separation. When Lynn returns from Hollywood she discovers that a hearing has been set and learns from Judge Parker that she must pay David alimony of four hundred dollars a month during their separation, as she earns more than he. David doesn't want the money, but decides to "raise the ante" on their game of wills and accept. Some time later they meet in a nightclub where he has taken Claudia Weston, a client of Harry's. Lynn decides to go with them to the apartment of client George Wallace, who is also an old friend of David's, and watch George, perform on war drums left to him by his Indian grandfather. ... +


David Conway and his wife Lynn, happily married for five years, owe their affluent New York lifestyle more to Lynn's salary as a successful literary and theatrical agent than David's as a ship designer. When David learns that he soon will be in charge of a shipyard in New Bedford, he assumes that Lynn will quit her job and be content to live on his salary, but she feels that her work is just as important as his. They argue, then make-up, but each incorrectly assumes that the other has changed position. When Lynn suggests that they each keep their jobs and get together on weekends, David realizes that she will not give up her work and leaves. Though she is very upset, her boss, Harry Borden, tells her to "out bluff" David by going on an assignment for a few days in Hollywood. Meanwhile, Harry's lawyer, Samuel Z. Walker, and David's lawyer, William Regan, discuss terms of the separation. When Lynn returns from Hollywood she discovers that a hearing has been set and learns from Judge Parker that she must pay David alimony of four hundred dollars a month during their separation, as she earns more than he. David doesn't want the money, but decides to "raise the ante" on their game of wills and accept. Some time later they meet in a nightclub where he has taken Claudia Weston, a client of Harry's. Lynn decides to go with them to the apartment of client George Wallace, who is also an old friend of David's, and watch George, perform on war drums left to him by his Indian grandfather. When David and Claudia leave, Lynn realizes that their marriage is over. A few days later, Lynn's Uncle Dawson sends a telegram that he wants to spend a night with them on the way to Europe, and she asks David to pretend that they are together so that Dawson will not be upset. This gives Walker a perfect opportunity to have someone spy on David and show that he returned home and therefore should not get alimony. During the night a storm frightens David and he goes to Lynn's room to comfort her. They are on the verge of being reconciled when Uncle Dawson catches Wilkins, Walker's "spy," in the hall. David then leaves, thinking that the whole thing was a trick perpetrated by Lynn. The next day, Lynn learns through the results of a routine examination for life insurance that she is pregnant. She goes to David, who is clearing his things from their apartment, and asks to be reconciled, but he refuses, saying that nothing is left between them. She leaves without telling him about the baby, but a few moments later Harry and Walker, both drunk from celebrating, joyfully congratulate David on the baby. David then runs after Lynn and they drive off for New Bedford together. David then says that maybe they should have a baby and Lynn says she'll think about it. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.