Super Dude (1975)

R | 94 mins | Adventure | 1975

Director:

Henry Hathaway

Producer:

Martin Rackin

Cinematographer:

Robert Hauser

Editor:

Chris Kaeselau

Production Designer:

Jim Halsey

Production Company:

Brut Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The Summary for this unviewed film was based on the 14 Jul 1975 Box review and a theatrical trailer.
       Working titles for the film included Super Dude and Face of Night.
       Film rights to Bernard Brunner’s 1967 novel, The Face of Night, were initially acquired by CBS Films, as noted in a 9 Apr 1967 HR news brief. Bing Crosby Productions later attempted to purchase the rights from the H. N. Swanson, Inc. agency, but producer Martin Rankin had recently acquired rights through a different agency, Molson-Stanton Associates, as noted in the 1 Jan 1973 Publishers Weekly.
       An 11 Mar 1970 HR news item stated that Albert Maltz had been hired to write; however, he is credited onscreen by his pseudonym, John B. Sherry, and shares screenwriting credit with Lee Lazich. According to a 29 Nov 1972 Var news item, Rankin researched the film by spending time with the Los Angeles Police Department’s narcotics squad.
       Items in the 14 Dec 1972 and 10 Jan 1973 HR announced that principal photography would begin 15 Jan 1973; however, the start date was delayed to 23 Jan 1973, according to an HR news item of the same date. A 15 Mar 1973 DV brief reported that filming ended 13 Mar 1973, on director Henry Hathaway’s seventy-fifth birthday. The production budget was $900,000, according to a 15 Jan 1975 Var article.
       The 14 Jul 1975 Box review stated that Warner Bros. was the film’s initial domestic distributor; however, after two test engagements, Brut ... More Less

The Summary for this unviewed film was based on the 14 Jul 1975 Box review and a theatrical trailer.
       Working titles for the film included Super Dude and Face of Night.
       Film rights to Bernard Brunner’s 1967 novel, The Face of Night, were initially acquired by CBS Films, as noted in a 9 Apr 1967 HR news brief. Bing Crosby Productions later attempted to purchase the rights from the H. N. Swanson, Inc. agency, but producer Martin Rankin had recently acquired rights through a different agency, Molson-Stanton Associates, as noted in the 1 Jan 1973 Publishers Weekly.
       An 11 Mar 1970 HR news item stated that Albert Maltz had been hired to write; however, he is credited onscreen by his pseudonym, John B. Sherry, and shares screenwriting credit with Lee Lazich. According to a 29 Nov 1972 Var news item, Rankin researched the film by spending time with the Los Angeles Police Department’s narcotics squad.
       Items in the 14 Dec 1972 and 10 Jan 1973 HR announced that principal photography would begin 15 Jan 1973; however, the start date was delayed to 23 Jan 1973, according to an HR news item of the same date. A 15 Mar 1973 DV brief reported that filming ended 13 Mar 1973, on director Henry Hathaway’s seventy-fifth birthday. The production budget was $900,000, according to a 15 Jan 1975 Var article.
       The 14 Jul 1975 Box review stated that Warner Bros. was the film’s initial domestic distributor; however, after two test engagements, Brut Productions took over distribution. According to the 15 Jan 1975 Var, Warner Bros. tested the film in Baltimore, MD, and Richmond, VA, before putting it in abeyance. Although the test screenings likely took place in 1974, specific dates could not be determined. After Warner Bros. backed out, Brut Productions’ George Barrie arranged a 15 Jan 1975 opening in East Orange, NJ, using a four-wall distribution model. By Jul 1975, Dimension Pictures had acquired distribution rights and released the film with the new title Super Dude, according to Box.
       A 22 Sep 1976 HR item reported that Super Dude would be re-released in a four-film “Dusk-to-Dawn Marathon,” along with Boss Nigger (1975, see entry), Tough (1974, see entry), and Twilight People (1972, see entry).
       Hangup was director Henry Hathaway’s last film.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jul 1975
p. 4796.
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1973.
---
Daily Variety
15 Mar 1973.
---
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 1967.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1970.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1972
p. 1, 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 1973
p. 32.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1973
p. 30.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 1976.
---
Publishers Weekly
1 Jan 1973.
---
Variety
29 Nov 1972.
---
Variety
15 Jan 1975
p. 4.
Variety
5 Feb 1975.
---
Village Voice
20-26 May 1981
p. 63, 70, 75.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Key grip
Best boy
Crab dolly
Gaffer
Best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set coord
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop man
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Cost set man
MUSIC
Mus comp
SOUND
Boom man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod secy
Casting secy
Scr supv
Transportation capt
Sr unit pub
Prod auditor
Craft serviceman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Face of Night by Bernard Brunner (New York, 1967).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Hangup
Face of Night
Release Date:
1975
Premiere Information:
East Orange, NJ, opening: 15 January 1975
New York opening: week of 27 January 1975
Production Date:
23 January--13 March 1973
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, African American police detective Ken Ramsey becomes infatuated with Julie Turner, a drug-addicted prostitute. While working undercover, he meets Julie’s pimp, a drug dealer, and brutally beats him. ... +


In Los Angeles, California, African American police detective Ken Ramsey becomes infatuated with Julie Turner, a drug-addicted prostitute. While working undercover, he meets Julie’s pimp, a drug dealer, and brutally beats him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.