Dead-Bang (1989)

R | 105 mins | Drama | 24 March 1989

Director:

John Frankenheimer

Writer:

Robert Foster

Producer:

Steve Roth

Cinematographer:

Gerry Fisher

Production Designer:

Ken Adam

Production Company:

Lorimar Film Entertainment
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HISTORY

According to the 14 Feb 1988 LAT, the picture was based on the real-life experience of Los Angeles, CA, Sheriff’s Department homicide detective, Jerome Beck, who sold the rights to his story to director John Frankenheimer after meeting him several years earlier.
       Principal photography began on 14 Apr 1988 in Calgary, Canada, as announced in the 25 Apr 1988 HR news item. Production would spend its final three weeks of its ten week schedule filming exterior scenes in Los Angeles, CA. The 15 Mar 1989 HR reported a $14.5--$15 million budget.
       Producer Steve Roth wrote a letter to the editor, which was published in the 26 Nov 1989 LAT, defending of actor Don Johnson, who was the subject of a negative news article in the newspaper on 5 Nov 1989, implying that director Frankenheimer and Roth had not wanted to cast Johnson in the film. Steve Roth praised Johnson’s performance, and debunked the previous article.
       The Jun 1989 Box reported a box-office gross of $7.4 million after four weeks of release.
       End credits note: “Filmed on location in: City of Calgary, City of Drumheller, Town of High River, Province of Alberta, City of Los ... More Less

According to the 14 Feb 1988 LAT, the picture was based on the real-life experience of Los Angeles, CA, Sheriff’s Department homicide detective, Jerome Beck, who sold the rights to his story to director John Frankenheimer after meeting him several years earlier.
       Principal photography began on 14 Apr 1988 in Calgary, Canada, as announced in the 25 Apr 1988 HR news item. Production would spend its final three weeks of its ten week schedule filming exterior scenes in Los Angeles, CA. The 15 Mar 1989 HR reported a $14.5--$15 million budget.
       Producer Steve Roth wrote a letter to the editor, which was published in the 26 Nov 1989 LAT, defending of actor Don Johnson, who was the subject of a negative news article in the newspaper on 5 Nov 1989, implying that director Frankenheimer and Roth had not wanted to cast Johnson in the film. Steve Roth praised Johnson’s performance, and debunked the previous article.
       The Jun 1989 Box reported a box-office gross of $7.4 million after four weeks of release.
       End credits note: “Filmed on location in: City of Calgary, City of Drumheller, Town of High River, Province of Alberta, City of Los Angeles.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jun 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 1989
p. 4, 64.
Los Angeles Times
14 Feb 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1989
Calendar, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
26 Nov 1989.
---
New York Times
25 Mar 1989
p. 12.
Variety
29 Mar 1989
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Lorimar Film Entertainment Presents
A Steve Roth Production
A John Frankenheimer/Robert L. Rosen Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Still photog
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Cam cars and cam cranes provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir
Asst art dir
Draftsman
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Const coord
Set dec
Set dresser
Set dresser
Greensman
Prop master
Prop asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Addl mus by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
Title des by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Head makeup
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Weapons specialist
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Police liaison
Asst to Mr. Frankenheimer
Asst to Mr. Rosen
Asst to Mr. Roth
Scr supv
Research
Tech police consultant
Prod office coord
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod secy
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Casting/Western Canada
Casting/Toronto
Extras casting, Sally Perle & Associates
Extras casting
Catering
Catering
First aid/Craft service
First aid/Craft service
First aid
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts/Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts/Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Un Mundo Raro," performed by Los Tres Diamantes, courtesy of BMG Ariola International
"Serenata Huasteca," performed by Los Tres Ases, courtesy of BMG Ariola International.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dead Bang
Release Date:
24 March 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 March 1989
Production Date:
began 14 April 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Lorimar Film Entertainment Company
Copyright Date:
6 March 1990
Copyright Number:
PA467385
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29434
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, down-on-his-luck homicide detective Jerry Beck receives a restraining order from his recently divorced wife, Gloria Beck, to keep him away from their two children. Sometime later, Sergeant Gary Kimble approaches a suspect believed to be responsible for a convenience store robbery during which the store clerk was shot and injured. The unseen man shoots Sergeant Kimble point-blank and kills him. Jerry Beck investigates, and suspects that Bobby Burns, a recently paroled armed robber, may have committed the shootings. He contacts Burns’s parole officer, Elliot Webly, for information, but Webly refuses to cooperate since it is Christmas Eve. Later, Jerry attends a Christmas party and meets a woman named Linda. After spending the night together, Linda leaves abruptly in the morning. Jerry forces Elliot Webly to go with him on Christmas Day to find Bobby Burns at his mother’s house. Among several sleeping bikers, only Bobby’s brother, John Burns, is found. When the man Jerry believes to be Bobby Burns flees the house, Jerry chases and tackles him. However, he is Burns’s acquaintance, James “Hard Rock” Ellis, who reveals that Bobby Burns fled north in a maroon station wagon. When Jerry later telephones his former wife to wish his children a Merry Christmas, she refuses to let him speak to them. Sometime later, Jerry learns that Linda was the wife of murdered sergeant, Gary Kimble, and he tracks her down to chastise her for not telling him. Linda explains that she and Gary had been separated for eight months, but that she wants Jerry to kill the man who murdered her husband. ... +


In Los Angeles, California, down-on-his-luck homicide detective Jerry Beck receives a restraining order from his recently divorced wife, Gloria Beck, to keep him away from their two children. Sometime later, Sergeant Gary Kimble approaches a suspect believed to be responsible for a convenience store robbery during which the store clerk was shot and injured. The unseen man shoots Sergeant Kimble point-blank and kills him. Jerry Beck investigates, and suspects that Bobby Burns, a recently paroled armed robber, may have committed the shootings. He contacts Burns’s parole officer, Elliot Webly, for information, but Webly refuses to cooperate since it is Christmas Eve. Later, Jerry attends a Christmas party and meets a woman named Linda. After spending the night together, Linda leaves abruptly in the morning. Jerry forces Elliot Webly to go with him on Christmas Day to find Bobby Burns at his mother’s house. Among several sleeping bikers, only Bobby’s brother, John Burns, is found. When the man Jerry believes to be Bobby Burns flees the house, Jerry chases and tackles him. However, he is Burns’s acquaintance, James “Hard Rock” Ellis, who reveals that Bobby Burns fled north in a maroon station wagon. When Jerry later telephones his former wife to wish his children a Merry Christmas, she refuses to let him speak to them. Sometime later, Jerry learns that Linda was the wife of murdered sergeant, Gary Kimble, and he tracks her down to chastise her for not telling him. Linda explains that she and Gary had been separated for eight months, but that she wants Jerry to kill the man who murdered her husband. Meanwhile, in Cottonwood, Arizona, Bobby Burns and accomplices, Ray, “Sleepy,” and Crossfield, rob a bar and murder everyone inside. Cottonwood Chief of Police, Walker Hillard, telephones Jerry and alerts him to the crime, and Jerry travels to Arizona. Chief Hillard takes Jerry to an abandoned ranch where a maroon station wagon was seen. As they arrive, Burns and his crew open fire on them with automatic weapons. When the criminals flee, Jerry takes note of the white supremacist propaganda inside the hideout, and finds a lockbox containing a map and detailed itinerary of the criminals’ route. Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) agent Arthur Kressler arrives to join the investigation. When Jerry insists they pursue the white supremacist lead, Kressler dismisses its importance. Jerry pursues the gunmen, on his own, to Bogan, Oklahoma, and meets with local police. He asks about Reverend Gebhardt, whose name Jerry found on Burns’s map. When Agent Kressler follows Jerry to Bogan, they are directed to Reverend Gebhardt’s estate, which includes an Arian Nation church. Gebhardt unapologetically shares his racist beliefs with Jerry, but claims not to know Bobby Burns. However, the gunmen lie in wait nearby and sight Jerry Beck in their crosshairs. Sometime later, as Jerry drives through the small town, Bobby Burns appears in his back seat and holds him at gunpoint. He demands to know who Jerry is, spews racist propaganda, and threatens to kill him. Jerry escapes by crashing into an oncoming police cruiser, and a gunfight ensues. After narrowly escaping with his life, Jerry returns to Los Angeles and is chastised by his chief of police for pursuing Bobby Burns on his own. Jerry insists that Burns and his cohorts are involved in something bigger, and appeals to the chief for his support. The chief agrees, on condition that Jerry see psychologist, Dr. Alexander Krantz, and be deemed mentally sound. However, during his session, Jerry inadvertently offends Dr. Krantz, and when the doctor implies he will not write a favorable report, Jerry chokes Krantz and demands he not stand in the way of his investigation. Krantz acquiesces, and Jerry receives permission to continue pursuing Burns. He arrives in Boulder, Colorado, and is teamed up with Chief Dixon to search for Burns at the Selby Ranch. Jerry is surprised to see that Agent Kressler has followed him to Boulder, and accuses the agent of trying to interfere with his investigation. Chief Dixon assembles his team, and they surround the ranch, which serves as a white supremacist compound. Jerry finds Reverend Gebhardt holding court inside, and Gebhardt orders the heavily armed militants not to interfere with the police search. Jerry is discouraged when Burns and his cohorts are not found. However, before leaving, he finds a secret passageway leading to a tunnel deep below ground. As the team makes their silent pursuit, Kressler alerts the criminals to their arrival, thwarting their surprise attack. A gunfight erupts, and Jerry pursues Bobby Burns deeper into the tunnel, and after a lengthy battle, shoots Burns. However, as he lies dying, Burns denies robbing the convenience store and killing Sergeant Kimble. Kressler enters and chastises Jerry for pursuing the wrong man, and Bobby’s brother, John Burns, appears. He holds Jerry and Kressler at gunpoint, and takes credit for the crimes in Los Angeles, claiming it was a way to prove himself to Bobby. The men exchange gunfire, and Jerry kills John Burns. Afterward, the FBI holds a press conference, finally acknowledging the threat of white supremacy groups. Chief Dixon commends Jerry, insisting he would work with the unconventional detective anytime. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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