Lovesick (1983)

PG | 96 mins | Romance, Comedy | 18 February 1983

Director:

Marshall Brickman

Producer:

Charles Okun

Cinematographer:

Gerry Fisher

Editor:

Nina Feinberg

Production Designer:

Philip Rosenberg

Production Company:

The Ladd Company
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HISTORY

       The 26 Jun 1979 DV reported that writer-director Marshall Brickman was developing a screenplay for Valium, the working title of his second film for Orion Picture Corp., which would likely star actor Peter Sellers. An article in the 9 Nov 1979 DV mentioned that Brickman expected production to begin in 1980 or 1981. Orion eventually withdrew from the project.
       The 18 Jun 1981 DV announced actors Peter Falk and Beverly D’Angelo for the lead roles. Falk replaced Sellers, who died of a heart attack on 24 Jul 1980. On 29 Jul 1981, HR reported that actresses Diane Keaton, Mary Steenburgen, and Ellen Burstyn were under consideration for the female lead, with no further mention of D’Angelo. Principal photography was set to begin Sep 1981. However, Falk was dissatisfied with Brickman’s screenplay and resigned from the project while it was in pre-production, as stated in the 10 Aug 1981 LAT. Alan Ladd, Jr., of The Ladd Company, which was producing the film, expressed his reluctance to proceed without Falk, and hoped that Brickman’s revised script would meet with the actor’s approval. However, when Falk rejected the new screenplay, he was replaced with actor Dudley Moore, as reported in the 26 Aug 1981 LAT. Principal photography was postponed until Jan 1982.
       The 30 Oct 1981 HR announced the Ladd Company’s lawsuit against Falk for $500,000, as compensation for his refusing to appear in the film, which was, at that time, retitled Analysis. After signing a contract to appear in the ... More Less

       The 26 Jun 1979 DV reported that writer-director Marshall Brickman was developing a screenplay for Valium, the working title of his second film for Orion Picture Corp., which would likely star actor Peter Sellers. An article in the 9 Nov 1979 DV mentioned that Brickman expected production to begin in 1980 or 1981. Orion eventually withdrew from the project.
       The 18 Jun 1981 DV announced actors Peter Falk and Beverly D’Angelo for the lead roles. Falk replaced Sellers, who died of a heart attack on 24 Jul 1980. On 29 Jul 1981, HR reported that actresses Diane Keaton, Mary Steenburgen, and Ellen Burstyn were under consideration for the female lead, with no further mention of D’Angelo. Principal photography was set to begin Sep 1981. However, Falk was dissatisfied with Brickman’s screenplay and resigned from the project while it was in pre-production, as stated in the 10 Aug 1981 LAT. Alan Ladd, Jr., of The Ladd Company, which was producing the film, expressed his reluctance to proceed without Falk, and hoped that Brickman’s revised script would meet with the actor’s approval. However, when Falk rejected the new screenplay, he was replaced with actor Dudley Moore, as reported in the 26 Aug 1981 LAT. Principal photography was postponed until Jan 1982.
       The 30 Oct 1981 HR announced the Ladd Company’s lawsuit against Falk for $500,000, as compensation for his refusing to appear in the film, which was, at that time, retitled Analysis. After signing a contract to appear in the production, Falk was paid $19,000 for expenses, with a guarantee of $1.5 million upon completion, in addition to either $250,000 or a percentage of gross receipts. The outcome of the case could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.
       HR reported that the picture’s title was changed to Love Sick, on 4 Dec 1981, and then Lovesick, on 3 Mar 1982. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, principal photography began 22 Feb 1982 in New York City. Interior sets for the analyst’s office and the bedroom scenes were constructed at the Pathé Studio on 106th Street, in the neighborhood known as “Spanish Harlem.” Sir Alec Guinness performed the majority of his scenes at the studio, marking the actor’s first film made in New York City. Following three weeks of photography at Pathé, the production moved to such locations as the Lincoln Center, the Julliard School of Drama, an apartment overlooking Gracie Square, which provided the set for the birthday party sequence, a restaurant in the “Little Italy” district, Mt. Sinai hospital, an art gallery in the “SoHo” district, Goldwater Hospital on Roosevelt Island, and the interior of an apartment on West 86th Street, which served as the “Larry Geller” home. Additional locations were set in the town of Westbury, NY, on Long Island. A 26 May 1982 press release from Warner Bros. Pictures, the film’s distributor, announced the completion of photography. The 28 May 1982 HR included the cities of Fort Lee, NJ, and Englewood Cliffs, NJ, among the filming locations.
       The 18 Jan 1983 LAHExam reported Dudley Moore’s plans to preview the picture to an audience of Beverly Hills, CA, psychiatrists, which he anticipated to be “an experience any psychiatrist should enjoy.” Warner Bros. scheduled a nationwide opening for 18 Feb 1983. The date of the preview screening has not been determined.
       In the 24 Feb 1983 HR, Brickman estimated the film’s budget as “a little under $10 million,” and described its initial release of 800 prints as “modest.” He explained his choice of Sir Alec Guinness to portray pioneering psychologist Sigmund Freud, a small role that required an authoritative actor. Brickman believed the picture exposed the gap between contemporary psychiatry and Freud’s original concepts of psychoanalysis.
       Lovesick garnered mixed reviews. While the 18 Feb 1983 NYT emphasized its “good-humored, consistent intelligence,” the 9 Feb 1983 Var considered it a disappointment.
      End credits conclude with the following statement: “The producers wish to thank the Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting of the City of New York, Nancy Littlefield, Director, for their cooperation in this production.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Jun 1979.
---
Daily Variety
9 Nov 1979
p. 1, 35, 36.
Daily Variety
12 Jun 1981.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1981.
---
Daily Variety
1 Dec 1981.
---
Daily Variety
28 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 1983
pp. 3-4
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1983.
---
LAHExam
18 Jan 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Aug 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Feb 1983
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Apr 1982.
---
New York Times
18 Feb 1983
p. 19.
Variety
9 Feb 1983
p. 23.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
DGA trainee
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key grip
Best boy
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Sketch artist
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const grip
Scene chargeman
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
Asst cost des
MUSIC
Mus orch and cond by
Solo flute
Mus rec eng
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Looping ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opt by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Unit pub
Teamster capt
Asst teamster capt
Extras casting
Magic consultant
Loc coord
Asst to the prod
Asst to Mr. Brickman
Asst to Mr. Brickman
Asst to the auditors
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod services by
Orig paintings by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Consultant
Timer
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Valium
Analysis
Love Sick
Release Date:
18 February 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 18 February 1983
Production Date:
22 February--late May 1982 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
The Ladd Company
Copyright Date:
23 May 1983
Copyright Number:
PA177757
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26533
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, psychiatrist Saul Benjamin meets with assorted patients, including the fatalistic, frantic Mr. Hausman, bored housewife Mrs. Mondragon, and Mr. Arnold, who has remained silent during three years of analysis. Afterward, he teaches a group of interns at a mental hospital, using Marvin Zuckerman, a homeless schizophrenic, as a case study. That evening, Saul and his wife, Katie, attend a birthday party for Otto Jaffe, a fellow psychiatrist who is romantically obsessed with one of his patients, a young playwright named Chloe Allen. Otto asks Saul’s advice in the matter, but rejects any suggestion of referring the patient to a colleague. Otto dies of a heart attack that night, and within a few days, Chloe appears at Saul’s office, asking to continue her therapy. As Chloe describes her anxiety disorder, Saul starts to fall in love with her. In his reverie, Saul is visited by the spirit of pioneering psychologist Sigmund Freud, who scolds him for his lack of professionalism, while suspecting that the attraction is mutual. Meanwhile, Chloe discusses her volatile romance with actor Ted Caruso, the egotistic star of her latest play. One evening, Saul attends an art opening at Katie’s gallery, and meets artist Jac Applezweig, a crude man with a sexual fixation. Saul excuses himself and telephones Chloe, but when she answers, he is unable to speak and hangs up. At her next session, Chloe is upset by the call, believing it was intended to be obscene, and looks to Saul as a protector. He argues that this perception is common among psychiatric patients, but Chloe counters that she never felt ... +


In New York City, psychiatrist Saul Benjamin meets with assorted patients, including the fatalistic, frantic Mr. Hausman, bored housewife Mrs. Mondragon, and Mr. Arnold, who has remained silent during three years of analysis. Afterward, he teaches a group of interns at a mental hospital, using Marvin Zuckerman, a homeless schizophrenic, as a case study. That evening, Saul and his wife, Katie, attend a birthday party for Otto Jaffe, a fellow psychiatrist who is romantically obsessed with one of his patients, a young playwright named Chloe Allen. Otto asks Saul’s advice in the matter, but rejects any suggestion of referring the patient to a colleague. Otto dies of a heart attack that night, and within a few days, Chloe appears at Saul’s office, asking to continue her therapy. As Chloe describes her anxiety disorder, Saul starts to fall in love with her. In his reverie, Saul is visited by the spirit of pioneering psychologist Sigmund Freud, who scolds him for his lack of professionalism, while suspecting that the attraction is mutual. Meanwhile, Chloe discusses her volatile romance with actor Ted Caruso, the egotistic star of her latest play. One evening, Saul attends an art opening at Katie’s gallery, and meets artist Jac Applezweig, a crude man with a sexual fixation. Saul excuses himself and telephones Chloe, but when she answers, he is unable to speak and hangs up. At her next session, Chloe is upset by the call, believing it was intended to be obscene, and looks to Saul as a protector. He argues that this perception is common among psychiatric patients, but Chloe counters that she never felt that way toward Otto. When she admits that she imagines kissing Saul, he fantasizes about the two of them having a picnic in Central Park, before his daydream is interrupted by the arrival of Mrs. Mondragon. Saul cancels Mrs. Mondragon’s session and follows Chloe to her rehearsal at the Lincoln Center Theater. Backstage, Chloe finds Ted flirting with a young actress. He then apologizes to Chloe for his latest transgression, and the two kiss passionately. Saul watches from the wardrobe room until his presence is betrayed by the sound of his pager, and he runs from the theater, concealing his identity under a costume. He later arrives at the office of his mentor, Dr. Larry Geller, and explains his infatuation with Chloe. Larry advises Saul to take a tranquilizer, then falls asleep himself as Saul tries to further discuss the matter. At her next meeting with Saul, Chloe reveals that she keeps a journal of the events in her life, which the doctor is determined to read. At the session’s conclusion, she accidentally leaves her purse behind, and Saul removes her apartment keys before she returns for the purse moments later. Saul enters the apartment while Chloe is out, and reads the journal in her bedroom, enraptured with her inner musings, particularly those that concern him. Chloe returns home, accompanied by Ted, and Saul hides behind the shower curtain as Chloe repeatedly urges Ted to leave. She locks herself in the bathroom and turns on the shower, forcing Saul to reveal himself. Chloe is pleasantly surprised, and when she is positive that Ted is gone, they make love. Later, Larry tells Saul that his neuroses have clouded his judgment regarding Chloe, and fears that she may bring a lawsuit against him in the future, creating a scandal in the mental health community. Though Saul insists that Chloe is no longer his patient, Larry directs him to terminate all contact until both parties can properly evaluate their emotions. Saul follows his mentor’s advice and ends the relationship the next morning, as Chloe struggles to hide her resentment. In the ensuing days, Saul takes tranquilizers to numb his emotions, then resumes the romance when Chloe telephones him during one of her anxiety attacks. While the couple is at dinner, Saul is summoned to his office, where a highly agitated Mr. Hausman is threatening suicide. The patient is suddenly concerned for his doctor’s health, as Saul admits to mixing tranquilizers and alcohol, prompting Hausman to call an ambulance. On their way to the hospital, Hausman complains about the $8,000 he has spent on analysis, from which he has derived little benefit. After Saul is discharged from the hospital, he visits Katie at her art gallery and discovers that she is having an affair with Jac Applezweig. When Saul discloses his affair with Chloe, they laugh and agree to separate. Saul then informs Mrs. Mondragon that she does not require treatment, sends Hausman a $6,500 refund, and offers his services to clients at a homeless shelter. Word of Saul’s behavior reaches the state psychiatric association, and he is summoned to a dinner meeting at Larry’s home by the ruling committee. While Saul prepares his defense, he asks Chloe to take his patient, Marvin Zuckerman, to the Social Security office, a simple errand that is complicated by the man’s psychosis. Discovering that she is late for an important meeting, Chloe abandons Zuckerman and leaves for the theater. That night, Saul berates Chloe for her insensitivity, blaming it Freud’s theory of “penis envy.” The argument escalates until Chloe storms out of the apartment. Later, at Larry’s townhouse, Saul is introduced to doctors Lionel Gross, Harriet Singer, and Gunnar Bergsen, among others, who recommend that he end his romance with Chloe, and cease working with the homeless, as they are beyond treatment. Instead, Saul resigns from the association, then stuns the committee with a magic trick, pulling the tablecloth out from under the dishes. He returns to his office, where the spirit of Freud bids him farewell, and informs Saul that psychoanalysis was a mere experiment that accidentally became “an industry.” As Saul goes outside to hail a taxicab, he notices Chloe at the park across the street. They wander through the park together, with Zuckerman following at a distance. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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