Sibling Rivalry (1990)

PG-13 | 88 mins | Comedy | 26 October 1990

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HISTORY

According to a 5 Feb 1990 DV “Just for Variety” column, Castle Rock Entertainment founder Rob Reiner had recently sent the Sibling Rivalry script to his father, Carl Reiner, who signed on to direct shortly after reading it. Only the week before, DV reported that, after reading several disappointing scripts for potential directing jobs, Carl Reiner would take a break from directing to write a novel.
       A 10 Feb 1990 Screen International item stated that Rick Moranis would play “Nicholas Meany,” Randy Quaid would appear as his brother, “Wilbur Meany,” and Elizabeth Perkins was in talks to play “one of the rival sisters.” However, none appeared in the final film.
       Kirstie Alley’s casting was announced in the 17 Mar 1990 Screen International, although her involvement was said to be “pending scheduling snafus,” as the actress was filming the television series Cheers (NBC, 30 Sep 1982--19 Aug 1993) and the upcoming Look Who’s Talking Too (1990, see entry), expected begin shooting in summer 1990. A 1 May 1990 DV “Just for Variety” column later reported that Alley’s Sibling Rivalry scenes would have to be shot by mid-Jun 1990 to accommodate her schedule. The actress’s salary was cited as $1.5 million in a 5 Sep 1990 DV brief. As noted in a 22 Jul 1990 NYT article, she had previously worked with Carl Reiner on the 1987 film, Summer School (see entry).
       A 21 Mar 1990 DV article listed the budget as $16 million and stated that filming was set to begin 18 Apr ... More Less

According to a 5 Feb 1990 DV “Just for Variety” column, Castle Rock Entertainment founder Rob Reiner had recently sent the Sibling Rivalry script to his father, Carl Reiner, who signed on to direct shortly after reading it. Only the week before, DV reported that, after reading several disappointing scripts for potential directing jobs, Carl Reiner would take a break from directing to write a novel.
       A 10 Feb 1990 Screen International item stated that Rick Moranis would play “Nicholas Meany,” Randy Quaid would appear as his brother, “Wilbur Meany,” and Elizabeth Perkins was in talks to play “one of the rival sisters.” However, none appeared in the final film.
       Kirstie Alley’s casting was announced in the 17 Mar 1990 Screen International, although her involvement was said to be “pending scheduling snafus,” as the actress was filming the television series Cheers (NBC, 30 Sep 1982--19 Aug 1993) and the upcoming Look Who’s Talking Too (1990, see entry), expected begin shooting in summer 1990. A 1 May 1990 DV “Just for Variety” column later reported that Alley’s Sibling Rivalry scenes would have to be shot by mid-Jun 1990 to accommodate her schedule. The actress’s salary was cited as $1.5 million in a 5 Sep 1990 DV brief. As noted in a 22 Jul 1990 NYT article, she had previously worked with Carl Reiner on the 1987 film, Summer School (see entry).
       A 21 Mar 1990 DV article listed the budget as $16 million and stated that filming was set to begin 18 Apr 1990. A 17 Apr 1990 HR production chart cited 16 Apr 1990 as the official start date. Filming took place in Los Angeles, CA, and Marin County, CA, as noted in a 19 Oct 1990 HR brief which stated that the cast and crew occupied eighty of the Best Western Corte Madera Inn’s 110 rooms while filming there. Locations also included a 1920s residence in Pasadena, CA, which stood in for the home of Wilbur Meany.
       Critical reception was tepid. The Dec 1990 Box review, which called the film “loud and tasteless,” noted that after ten days in release, box-office grosses were “a mild $8.4 million.” A 27 Dec 1990 DV box-office chart stated the film had earned $17,518,417 to that time.
       According to the 22 Oct 1990 Var review, Sibling Rivalry marked Martha Goldhirsh’s feature film screenwriting debut.
       End credits include the following statements: “Film clip courtesy of Universal Pictures, from the film Dracula starring Frank Langella with Jan Francis”; “Filmed at Warner Hollywood Studios, Los Angeles, California, and on location in Los Angeles and Marin County, California”; and, “Producers wish to thank: ITT Sheraton; Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company; Jeffrey Stott; Jess Wittenberg; John DeSimio; Christy Dimmig and Joseph Popelka.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Dec 1990.
---
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1990.
---
Daily Variety
21 Mar 1990
p. 1, 12.
Daily Variety
1 May 1990
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jun 1990
pp. 21-22.
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1990.
---
Daily Variety
27 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 1990
p. 5, 14.
Los Angeles Times
26 Oct 1990
p. 10.
New York Times
22 Jul 1990
Section A, p. 9.
New York Times
26 Oct 1990
p. 12.
Screen International
10 Feb 1990.
---
Screen International
17 Mar 1990.
---
Variety
22 Oct 1990
p. 60.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
In association with Nelson Entertainment presents
A Carl Reiner film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Asst Steadicam
Asst Steadicam
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Best boy elec
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Rigging key grip
Rigging key grip
Still photog
Photographic equip by
Cranes and dollies by
ART DIRECTORS
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Ed intern
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Lead set des
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
General foreman
Paint foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Labor foreman
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Greensman
Asst greensman
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key set costumer
Set costumer
Addl costumer
Addl costumer
Addl costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus project mgr
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable woman
Cable woman
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Spec make-up eff
Spec make-up eff
Spec make-up eff
Spec make-up eff
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Video assist
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Asst to Mr. Reiner
Asst to Ms. Glotzer
Asst to Ms. Alley
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Payroll clerk
Post prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Casting asst
Atmosphere casting, Cenex Casting
Atmosphere casting
Atmosphere casting
Set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Marin driver capt
Caterer
Caterer
Caterer
Craft service
First aid
Banking services provided by
Kitchen appliances provided by
Kitchen appliances provided by
Vertical blinds provided by
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
ANIMATION
Photog & printed on
SOURCES
SONGS
“Honky Tonk Man,” written by Johnny Horton, Howard Harvey, & Tillman Franks, published by Cederwood Publishing, performed by Dwight Yoakam, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“”If I Were The Man You Wanted,” written by Lyle Lovett, published by Michael H. Goldsen, Inc./Lyle Lovett, performed by Lyle Lovett, courtesy of Curb Records/MCA Records
“Warm Love,” written and performed by Joan Armatrading, published by Irving Music, Inc., courtesy of A & M Records
+
SONGS
“Honky Tonk Man,” written by Johnny Horton, Howard Harvey, & Tillman Franks, published by Cederwood Publishing, performed by Dwight Yoakam, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“”If I Were The Man You Wanted,” written by Lyle Lovett, published by Michael H. Goldsen, Inc./Lyle Lovett, performed by Lyle Lovett, courtesy of Curb Records/MCA Records
“Warm Love,” written and performed by Joan Armatrading, published by Irving Music, Inc., courtesy of A & M Records
“Bach Gm Fugue,” arranged by Mike Marshall, performed by Modern Mandolin Quartet, courtesy of Windham Hill Records
“Just A Little Lovin’,” written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, published by Screen Gems-EMI Music Inc., performed by Estelle Reiner
“Quartet For Piano And Strings In G Minor K.478,” Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, performed by Vienna Chamber Orchestra, soloist Philippe Entremont, courtesy Proarte.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 October 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 October 1990
Production Date:
began mid April 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Castle Rock Entertainment
Copyright Date:
2 November 1990
Copyright Number:
PA488948
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Prints
Prints by Consolidated Film Industries
Duration(in mins):
88
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Orphaned at a young age and left to care for her younger sister, Jeanine, Marjorie Turner thought her luck had changed when she met her future husband, Harry. However, shortly after they wed, Harry joined his family’s medical practice, and Marjorie realized she would be forever beholden to her overbearing, judgmental in-laws. Having sacrificed her dream of becoming a writer, Marjorie now struggles to be the perfect housewife while Harry neglects her in the bedroom. One day, Marjorie goes to the fish store where her sister Jeanine works. Although she encourages Jeanine to pursue a career, Jeanine defends her carefree lifestyle and suggests Marjorie is sexually frustrated and should have an affair. Marjorie leaves in a huff, and goes to the grocery store to buy food for a dinner party she is hosting that night, in honor of Harry’s brother Charles, who is returning from a fifteen-year stint overseas. In the checkout line, Marjorie meets a handsome stranger who is on his way to a party. He buys a fruit basket and arranges for it to be delivered to the party, which he admits he would rather not attend. In an uncharacteristic move, Marjorie encourages him to ditch the party, and accompanies him to a hotel room at the nearby Summit Bluff Sheraton. After a vigorous lovemaking session, she tells the man it can never happen again, but he is unresponsive. She prods him and realizes he is dead. In a panic, she flees the hotel room, tripping over a box of vertical blinds in the hallway on her way out. Nicholas “Nick” Meany, a hapless vertical blinds salesman who was hoping to sneak into one of ... +


Orphaned at a young age and left to care for her younger sister, Jeanine, Marjorie Turner thought her luck had changed when she met her future husband, Harry. However, shortly after they wed, Harry joined his family’s medical practice, and Marjorie realized she would be forever beholden to her overbearing, judgmental in-laws. Having sacrificed her dream of becoming a writer, Marjorie now struggles to be the perfect housewife while Harry neglects her in the bedroom. One day, Marjorie goes to the fish store where her sister Jeanine works. Although she encourages Jeanine to pursue a career, Jeanine defends her carefree lifestyle and suggests Marjorie is sexually frustrated and should have an affair. Marjorie leaves in a huff, and goes to the grocery store to buy food for a dinner party she is hosting that night, in honor of Harry’s brother Charles, who is returning from a fifteen-year stint overseas. In the checkout line, Marjorie meets a handsome stranger who is on his way to a party. He buys a fruit basket and arranges for it to be delivered to the party, which he admits he would rather not attend. In an uncharacteristic move, Marjorie encourages him to ditch the party, and accompanies him to a hotel room at the nearby Summit Bluff Sheraton. After a vigorous lovemaking session, she tells the man it can never happen again, but he is unresponsive. She prods him and realizes he is dead. In a panic, she flees the hotel room, tripping over a box of vertical blinds in the hallway on her way out. Nicholas “Nick” Meany, a hapless vertical blinds salesman who was hoping to sneak into one of the rooms and install his wares, discovers a wallet Marjorie accidentally dropped, but does not catch her in time to return it. He then notices the door to her hotel room is ajar and sneaks in. Marjorie arrives home and avoids Harry on her way to the shower. Still panicked, she calls police and leaves an anonymous tip about a dead body at the Summit Bluff Sheraton. Meanwhile, Nick Meany accidentally drops a rod while installing his blinds, hitting the corpse which is covered up by a sheet. Nick pulls down the sheet to discover the dead body. Harry’s family, sister Iris Turner-Hunter, and parents Rose and Charles, arrive for the dinner party. As Jeanine helps a frazzled Marjorie in the kitchen, they are interrupted by several phone calls from Nick, who stutteringly informs Marjorie that her “husband” is dead. He also reveals he has her wallet, and Marjorie promises to retrieve it in twenty minutes. She tells Harry’s family that she left her wallet at the grocery store just as a fruit basket arrives at the front door, with a card from Charles Turner instructing the family to start without him. Marjorie gasps at the realization that the handsome stranger she slept with was Harry’s brother. Back at the hotel, believing he has killed the man, Nick Meany frets over the consequences as his brother, Wilbur Meany, is up for a promotion to Chief of Police. Marjorie arrives and conspires with Nick to stage Charles’s death as a suicide, so neither of them will be implicated. At the same time, Wilbur Meany gets a call to investigate Marjorie’s “anonymous” phone call to the police station. He goes to Marjorie’s home, but only Jeanine is there. She explains Harry and his family went to a restaurant and invites Wilbur inside for tea. They flirt, and Jeanine assures Wilbur that Marjorie did not call about an emergency. The next morning, the Turners mourn Charles’s death. Marjorie goes to lunch with Jeanine, who announces that she met someone last night. As she describes the policeman, Marjorie becomes hysterical and confesses to having an affair with Harry’s now-dead brother. At the hospital, it soon becomes clear that the death of Charles Turner was not a suicide, despite the assortment of prescription pills lodged in his throat. That afternoon, Nick Meany goes to the police station and turns himself in for killing Charles. Although the controversy threatens to ruin his chances for a promotion, Wilbur Meany tells Jeanine he now only cares about helping his brother. The next morning, an exhausted Harry returns from the police station and calls a family meeting. As usual, Marjorie is ordered to make coffee for the Turners when they arrive. However, fed up, she blurts out that she had an affair with Charles, who may have died mid-coitus. Iris calls Marjorie a “slut,” and Rose asserts that she was never “one of us.” Harry loses his temper and sends them away. Marjorie packs her things to leave, but Harry insists on being the one to leave and storms out. Without Harry, Marjorie falls into a depression. She eventually channels her sorrow into writing. Soon, Wilbur is promoted to police chief and Jeanine moves in with him. Absolved of Charles’s murder, Nick thrives at work when the Summit Bluff Sheraton decides to purchase his vertical blinds for every room. Marjorie sends off her first completed story to publishers, and finally gets a call from Harry. He informs her he has set up his own medical practice and congratulates her on her story, which Jeanine secretly sent him. Harry asks Marjorie if he can see her soon, and she excitedly says yes. Moments later, he surprises her by showing up at the door. She asks if his heart is in good condition and draws him inside. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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