Regarding Henry (1991)

PG-13 | 107 mins | Drama | 10 July 1991

Director:

Mike Nichols

Writer:

J. J. Abrams

Cinematographer:

Guiseppe Rotunno

Editor:

Sam O'Steen

Production Designer:

Tony Walton

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corporation
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HISTORY

Screenwriter J. J. Abrams is credited as “Jeffrey Abrams.”
       End credits include the following statement: “The producers wish to thank the following for their assistance: The Mayor’s Office of Film, Theater & Broadcasting; The Burke Rehabilitation Hospital; Millbrook School; Rogers & Wells; The New York Public Library; Revillon Furs, Inc.; The Waterman Pen Company; Gagosian Gallery.”
       A 26 Mar 1990 DV article announced Regarding Henry would be Scott Rudin Productions’ next film to go into production, as part of a newly formed two-year distribution deal with Paramount Pictures. The project, budgeted at $25 million, marked director Mike Nichols’s second collaboration with actor Harrison Ford, after 1988’s Working Girl, as stated in the Aug 1991 issue of Us magazine. Nichols had also previously worked with actress Annette Bening on Postcards from the Edge (1990, see entry).
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, rehearsals took place in early Sep 1990. Principal photography began on 14 Sep 1990 in New York City, where locations included the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Plaza Hotel’s Edwardian Room and Oak Room, Rogers & Wells law office in the Pan Am Building, the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, the Junior League, and various locales in the Upper East Side, Upper West Side, and Greenwich Village. Scenes were also shot in Millbrook, NY, at the Millbrook School, which stood in for the fictional “Huntington.” As stated in a 31 Nov 1990 DV item, a pending I.A.T.S.E. (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) strike caused filmmakers to relocate to Paramount Studios in Los Angeles, CA, where interiors of Henry Turner’s apartment and rehabilitation center were built on ... More Less

Screenwriter J. J. Abrams is credited as “Jeffrey Abrams.”
       End credits include the following statement: “The producers wish to thank the following for their assistance: The Mayor’s Office of Film, Theater & Broadcasting; The Burke Rehabilitation Hospital; Millbrook School; Rogers & Wells; The New York Public Library; Revillon Furs, Inc.; The Waterman Pen Company; Gagosian Gallery.”
       A 26 Mar 1990 DV article announced Regarding Henry would be Scott Rudin Productions’ next film to go into production, as part of a newly formed two-year distribution deal with Paramount Pictures. The project, budgeted at $25 million, marked director Mike Nichols’s second collaboration with actor Harrison Ford, after 1988’s Working Girl, as stated in the Aug 1991 issue of Us magazine. Nichols had also previously worked with actress Annette Bening on Postcards from the Edge (1990, see entry).
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, rehearsals took place in early Sep 1990. Principal photography began on 14 Sep 1990 in New York City, where locations included the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Plaza Hotel’s Edwardian Room and Oak Room, Rogers & Wells law office in the Pan Am Building, the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, the Junior League, and various locales in the Upper East Side, Upper West Side, and Greenwich Village. Scenes were also shot in Millbrook, NY, at the Millbrook School, which stood in for the fictional “Huntington.” As stated in a 31 Nov 1990 DV item, a pending I.A.T.S.E. (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) strike caused filmmakers to relocate to Paramount Studios in Los Angeles, CA, where interiors of Henry Turner’s apartment and rehabilitation center were built on soundstages. The “enormous” apartment set, built on Stage 18, was inspired by the “mixed periods and styles” of interior designer John Saladino, and the classical style of designer Stephen Sills. The set included ceilings, with light sources set behind windows.
       Critical reception was mixed. While the 8 Jul DV review called the film “a subtle emotional journey impeccably orchestrated,” the HR review of the same date deemed it “creamily cutesy and unctuously uplifting.” As noted in the 4 Oct 1999 LAT, the cumulative box-office take was $43 million. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Mar 1990
p. 1, 18.
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1991
p. 2, 17.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 1991
p. 7, 13.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1991
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
4 Oct 1999
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
10 Jul 1991
p. 13.
Us
Aug 1991.
---
Variety
15 Jul 1991
p. 38.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Mike Nichols - Scott Rudin Production
A Mike Nichols Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
2d asst photog
Steadicam op
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
1st company grip
1st company grip
Still photog
Still photog
Video tech
Video tech
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set dec
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Prop master
Master scenic artist
Master scenic artist
Const coord
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Men's cost supv
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
Women's cost supv
Cost shopper
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Vocal performances
Mus scoring mixer
Bobby McFerrin performs courtesy of
a Division of Capitol Records, Inc.
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer, Sound One Corp.
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Dolby stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup/Hair supv
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod coord
Prod coord
Scr supv
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Loc scout
Loc scout
Prod auditor
Prod auditor
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Nichols
Asst to Mr. Nichols
Asst to Mr. Nichols
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Extras casting
Extras casting
Casting assoc
Casting assoc
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Walking On The Moon," performed by The Police, written by Sting, used courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Piano Concerto No. 21 In C Major," by W.A. Mozart, performed by Camerata Labacensis, conducted by Kurt Redel, courtesy of Laserlight, by arrangement with Sounds of Film, Ltd.
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 July 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 July 1991
Production Date:
14 September--early December 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
13 July 1991
Copyright Number:
PA535568
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30759
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, workaholic attorney Henry Turner delivers a closing argument in defense of East Shore Hospital, accused of malpractice by a diabetic patient named Jonathan Matthews. After winning the case, Henry makes a derisive remark about Mr. Matthews while celebrating the win at his office. His boss and mentor, Charlie Cameron, lovingly compares Henry to his late father, who was a fierce disciplinarian. That evening, Henry scolds his daughter, Rachel, for spilling juice on his piano, then goes to a business dinner with his wife, Sarah. When they return home, Henry goes out for cigarettes. He walks into a convenience store in the midst of an armed robbery, and is shot twice, in the chest and forehead. At the hospital, Sarah Turner finds her husband unconscious. Later, a neurologist tells her Henry was lucky because the second bullet struck the right frontal lobe of his brain – the only lobe to have “redundant systems.” However, the shot to his chest hit a big artery, causing anoxia, a stoppage of oxygen, to the brain. Henry will have a long, difficult rehabilitation, and there is no way of knowing if he will regain his speech, long-term memory, or motor skills. When he is well enough, Henry is moved to a rehabilitation center. There, he is treated by Dr. Marsh, a physical therapist named Bradley, and a speech therapist. Henry is slow to regain his speech, but Bradley expedites the process by sneaking hot sauce into his eggs. Henry makes noise for the first time when he spits out the eggs. Bradley coaches him to ask for different food, and Henry says, “Ritz.” Bradley assumes Henry wants Ritz crackers and ... +


In New York City, workaholic attorney Henry Turner delivers a closing argument in defense of East Shore Hospital, accused of malpractice by a diabetic patient named Jonathan Matthews. After winning the case, Henry makes a derisive remark about Mr. Matthews while celebrating the win at his office. His boss and mentor, Charlie Cameron, lovingly compares Henry to his late father, who was a fierce disciplinarian. That evening, Henry scolds his daughter, Rachel, for spilling juice on his piano, then goes to a business dinner with his wife, Sarah. When they return home, Henry goes out for cigarettes. He walks into a convenience store in the midst of an armed robbery, and is shot twice, in the chest and forehead. At the hospital, Sarah Turner finds her husband unconscious. Later, a neurologist tells her Henry was lucky because the second bullet struck the right frontal lobe of his brain – the only lobe to have “redundant systems.” However, the shot to his chest hit a big artery, causing anoxia, a stoppage of oxygen, to the brain. Henry will have a long, difficult rehabilitation, and there is no way of knowing if he will regain his speech, long-term memory, or motor skills. When he is well enough, Henry is moved to a rehabilitation center. There, he is treated by Dr. Marsh, a physical therapist named Bradley, and a speech therapist. Henry is slow to regain his speech, but Bradley expedites the process by sneaking hot sauce into his eggs. Henry makes noise for the first time when he spits out the eggs. Bradley coaches him to ask for different food, and Henry says, “Ritz.” Bradley assumes Henry wants Ritz crackers and laughs. Over time, Henry speaks in full sentences and learns to walk again. He reacts to his accomplishments with childlike enthusiasm, paints pictures of Ritz cracker boxes, and becomes emotionally attached to Bradley. Meanwhile, Sarah worries about the family’s financial stability without Henry’s income, but her friend, Phyllis, encourages her to ignore the problem and spend more money. When it is time for Henry to return home, he still cannot remember his wife and daughter, whom he views as strangers. On the day they arrive to pick him up, he refuses to pack his things. Dr. Marsh informs Sarah that Henry might need more time at the rehabilitation center. Bradley encourages Rachel to talk to Henry alone, and she finds him struggling to tie his shoe. Rachel helps her father, and he asks who taught her to tie her shoe. She answers that he did, which sparks a memory of gray carpet. Henry excitedly tells Sarah and Dr. Marsh that he remembers gray carpet and is ready to go home. That night, Sarah coaxes a nervous Henry into bed and promises him everything will be okay. In the morning, Rosella, the housekeeper, serves them breakfast. Rachel accidentally spills her orange juice and scrambles to clean it up. Henry surprises his daughter by spilling his own juice to make her feel better. Later, Sarah asks Rosella to look after Henry while she goes out. Henry wanders around the apartment aimlessly and asks Rosella what he normally does. She answers that Henry is “always working.” A deliveryman shows up, and Henry sneaks out of the apartment without Rosella noticing. Walking around the city, he eats junk food, sees an adult movie at a seedy theater, and buys a puppy from a pet store. Sarah panics when she returns home and Henry is not there. She calls police, but he soon returns with the puppy. Rachel embraces the dog and names it “Buddy,” as Sarah reprimands Henry for leaving without telling anyone. Later, Henry goes to the library with Rachel. He distracts her from her homework and finally confesses that he cannot read. Using children’s books, Rachel teaches him to read again. Charlie Cameron throws a dinner party in Henry’s honor. Henry’s co-workers are surprised when he makes a short speech, admitting that he doesn’t remember any of them and asking them to be patient. He is nevertheless welcomed back to work, where he spends time reading old case files. He finds buried evidence from the Matthews v. East Shore Hospital case that proves Mr. Matthews disclosed his diabetic status to a nurse, when the hospital claimed he did not. He presents the evidence to his co-workers, Bruce and Linda, who laugh it off and remind him that clients like East Shore Hospital pay for their lunch. Henry learns Rachel will soon go to Huntington, an elite boarding school, despite wanting to stay with her parents. He promises to talk to Sarah, but cannot dissuade her. She argues that Huntington, which only accepts thirty students per year, is the best option for Rachel. When they drop Rachel off at the school, she is miserable. Henry pretends to remember his first day of school, and tells a story to cheer her up. Back in the city, Henry and Sarah attend a dinner party at Phyllis’s house. When Henry and Sarah decide to leave early, they overhear Phyllis and her friends lamenting Henry’s transformation from a brilliant attorney to an “imbecile.” The next day, a depressed Henry refuses to get out of bed. Sarah brings Bradley home to cheer him up. Henry tells Bradley he does not like his old life, and Bradley encourages him to start anew. The next day, his co-worker, Bruce, sends Henry a gift, and Henry recognizes Bruce’s blue stationery from a stack of cards he saw in the closet. He retrieves the stack of cards and discovers they are love letters from Bruce to Sarah. That evening, Henry confronts his wife, and she confesses to having a short-lived affair. However, she argues that she and Henry were miserable before the injury, and their relationship is better now. Henry storms out, grabs a file from his office, and takes the buried evidence from the Matthews v. East Shore Hospital case to the Matthews apartment. Apologizing to Jonathan Matthews’s wife, Henry gives her the evidence and encourages her to bring it to her lawyer. He returns to work, and interrupts a meeting to quit his job. Afterward, he checks into the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. His ex-co-worker, Linda, knocks on the door, and reveals that she and Henry were having an affair before he was shot, and met every Tuesday and Thursday at the Ritz-Carlton. Henry returns home and reconciles with his wife. They go to Huntington to pick up Rachel. With Buddy the dog in tow, Henry interrupts a lecture, informing the headmistress that he missed the first eleven years of Rachel’s life and does not intend to miss anymore. The family embraces as they leave the chapel. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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