Stars and Bars (1988)

R | 94 or 98-99 mins | Comedy | 18 March 1988

Director:

Pat O'Connor

Writer:

William Boyd

Producer:

Sandy Lieberson

Cinematographer:

Jerzy Zielinski

Production Designers:

Leslie Dilley, Stuart Craig

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures
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HISTORY

According to an article in the 20 May 1987 Var, William Boyd’s novel was optioned by David Puttnam and his Enigma Productions to be produced with Warner Bros. However, Warner Bros. placed the project in turnaround, and it was picked up by Embassy, but Embassy dropped it. Producer Sandy Lieberson gained bank financing with a guarantee from Columbia Pictures to distribute the film.
       The 25 Mar 1987 Var production chart noted that principal photography began on 16 Mar 1987 in Georgia. Stars and Bars Ltd. was cited as being associated with the film, but is not credited onscreen.
       Locations included Atlanta, GA, Clarkesville, GA, Crawfordville, GA, and Tallapoosa, GA. The 15 May 1987 NYT reported that the picture was also to film in New York City for one week. As mentioned in the 20 May 1987 Var, the film wrapped on 14 May 1987. A 31 Dec 1987 Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc. press release stated the film’s budget was $7.5 million.
       The 16 Mar 1988 Var review listed the film’s duration as ninety-four minutes, while the review in the 18 Mar 1988 NYT listed ninety-eight minutes, and the 12 Apr 1988 HR review noted ninety-nine minutes. The copy viewed for this record was ninety-four minutes.
       End credits state: “Manuel Neri sculpture courtesy of Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, GA.” End credits also acknowledge “Special Thanks” to the following: “John and Katherine Kollck; Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel; Atlanta Police Department--Officer Bryant Knight; Georgia Film And Video Tape Office--The Georgia Department Of Industry And Trade--Norman ... More Less

According to an article in the 20 May 1987 Var, William Boyd’s novel was optioned by David Puttnam and his Enigma Productions to be produced with Warner Bros. However, Warner Bros. placed the project in turnaround, and it was picked up by Embassy, but Embassy dropped it. Producer Sandy Lieberson gained bank financing with a guarantee from Columbia Pictures to distribute the film.
       The 25 Mar 1987 Var production chart noted that principal photography began on 16 Mar 1987 in Georgia. Stars and Bars Ltd. was cited as being associated with the film, but is not credited onscreen.
       Locations included Atlanta, GA, Clarkesville, GA, Crawfordville, GA, and Tallapoosa, GA. The 15 May 1987 NYT reported that the picture was also to film in New York City for one week. As mentioned in the 20 May 1987 Var, the film wrapped on 14 May 1987. A 31 Dec 1987 Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc. press release stated the film’s budget was $7.5 million.
       The 16 Mar 1988 Var review listed the film’s duration as ninety-four minutes, while the review in the 18 Mar 1988 NYT listed ninety-eight minutes, and the 12 Apr 1988 HR review noted ninety-nine minutes. The copy viewed for this record was ninety-four minutes.
       End credits state: “Manuel Neri sculpture courtesy of Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, GA.” End credits also acknowledge “Special Thanks” to the following: “John and Katherine Kollck; Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel; Atlanta Police Department--Officer Bryant Knight; Georgia Film And Video Tape Office--The Georgia Department Of Industry And Trade--Norman Bielowicz; Henry Wyndham; All The Folks Of Helen, Georgia.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 1988
p. 10, 14.
Los Angeles Times
15 Apr 1988
Calendar, p. 28.
New York Times
15 May 1987
Section C, p. 8.
New York Times
18 Mar 1988
Section C, p. 3.
Variety
25 Mar 1987
p. 6.
Variety
20 May 1987
p. 41.
Variety
16 Mar 1988
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Columbia Pictures presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip/dolly grip
Stills photog
Steadicam op, New York
Best boy elec, New York
Stills photog, New York
Lighting by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadperson
On set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst props
Prop maker
Const coord
Const foreman
Scenic painter
Standby painter
Set dec, New York
Set dresser, New York
Set dresser, New York
Prop asst, New York
Const coord, New York crew
Scenic chargeperson, New York
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward asst
Ward supv, New York
Cost shopper, New York
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus rec
Mus rec at
Mus rec at
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Dubbing ed
Asst dubbing ed
Dial ed
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Rain eff, New York
Titles des by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
Asst makeup/Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod supv
Prod coord
Prod coord, London
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Loc casting
Loc casting asst
Dog trainer
Dog trainer
Dial coach
Dial coach
Press agent
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Los Angeles coord
Craft service
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod supv, New York
Prod coord, New York
Loc mgr, New York
Loc asst, New York
Asst accountant, New York
Teamster capt, New York
Extras casting, New York
Asst prod coord, New York
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Stars and Bars by William Boyd (New York, 1984
London, 1984).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“Englishman In New York,” written and performed by Sting, courtesy of A&M Records
“A Picture Of Me Without You,” written by Norris Wilson and George Richie, performed by George Jones, courtesy of CBS Records.
PERFORMERS
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 March 1988
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 March 1988
Los Angeles opening: 15 April 1988
Production Date:
16 March--14 May 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 April 1988
Copyright Number:
PA368421
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
94 or 98-99
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28728
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, Englishman Henderson Dores, an expert on Nineteenth Century art, practices fencing with his friend, Eugene Teagarden. Leaving the fencing club, Henderson arrives for work at an auction house. His boss, Edgar Beeby, tells Henderson that Loomis Gage, an eccentric millionaire from Luxora Beach, Georgia, has agreed to sell them a rare 1908 Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting. Henderson is tasked to travel to Georgia and obtain the painting. After work, Henderson goes to an art gallery and meets Irene Stien, a computer saleswoman. Although engaged to Edgar Beeby’s daughter, Melissa, Henderson is attracted to Irene and asks her out. The following day at lunch, Henderson tells Irene he is leaving for Georgia. Later, Henderson visits Melissa at her apartment, where her fifteen-year-old daughter, Bryant, asks to come with Henderson on his trip. He tells her no, but Bryant convinces her mother to let her go, and they surprise Henderson at the airport. Flying into Atlanta, Georgia, Henderson and Bryant drive to the rundown town of Luxora Beach. At the Loomis estate, Gage Mansion, they are greeted by Loomis and introduced to his four adult children: Freeborn, Cora, Beckman, and Duane. After Loomis leaves for a meeting in town, Freeborn threatens Henderson, insisting the painting is not for sale. Wanting to telephone Edgar Beeby, Henderson learns the only telephone on the estate is in Freeborn’s mobile home. Waiting until he leaves, Henderson asks Freeborn’s pregnant wife, Shanda, if he may use the telephone. During the call, Beeby ignores Henderson’s concerns about Freeborn and orders him to get the painting. Later, Henderson ... +


In New York City, Englishman Henderson Dores, an expert on Nineteenth Century art, practices fencing with his friend, Eugene Teagarden. Leaving the fencing club, Henderson arrives for work at an auction house. His boss, Edgar Beeby, tells Henderson that Loomis Gage, an eccentric millionaire from Luxora Beach, Georgia, has agreed to sell them a rare 1908 Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting. Henderson is tasked to travel to Georgia and obtain the painting. After work, Henderson goes to an art gallery and meets Irene Stien, a computer saleswoman. Although engaged to Edgar Beeby’s daughter, Melissa, Henderson is attracted to Irene and asks her out. The following day at lunch, Henderson tells Irene he is leaving for Georgia. Later, Henderson visits Melissa at her apartment, where her fifteen-year-old daughter, Bryant, asks to come with Henderson on his trip. He tells her no, but Bryant convinces her mother to let her go, and they surprise Henderson at the airport. Flying into Atlanta, Georgia, Henderson and Bryant drive to the rundown town of Luxora Beach. At the Loomis estate, Gage Mansion, they are greeted by Loomis and introduced to his four adult children: Freeborn, Cora, Beckman, and Duane. After Loomis leaves for a meeting in town, Freeborn threatens Henderson, insisting the painting is not for sale. Wanting to telephone Edgar Beeby, Henderson learns the only telephone on the estate is in Freeborn’s mobile home. Waiting until he leaves, Henderson asks Freeborn’s pregnant wife, Shanda, if he may use the telephone. During the call, Beeby ignores Henderson’s concerns about Freeborn and orders him to get the painting. Later, Henderson learns that Bryant spent the afternoon with Duane, who told her that Freeborn sold the painting without his father’s knowledge, to a shady art dealer named Sereno. Shanda tells Henderson that Irene Stien is on the telephone, and wants to visit him. Henderson asks Irene to meet him at his hotel in Atlanta on Saturday. Loomis returns home and shows Henderson the Renoir painting that he purchased in 1946 for $500 in Paris, France. Although he knows the painting is worth $10 million, Henderson offers $8 million and Loomis accepts. Later, Henderson and Bryant join Loomis, his mistress, Monika, her husband, the Revered Cardew, and his family for dinner. During dinner, Henderson asks Shanda to tell Irene that he will book her a hotel room for the weekend when she calls back. The following day, Shanda receives a telephone call from Melissa. Mistakenly believing Melissa to be Irene, Shanda gives her Henderson’s message. Excited, Melissa plans her trip to Atlanta. Later, Freeborn brings Sereno and his associate, Gint, to the house, and they offer Loomis $15 million for the painting. However, Loomis gives Henderson the chance to make a better offer. Leaving Bryant, Henderson goes to his hotel in Atlanta. Irene joins him in his room, but they are interrupted by Melissa’s arrival. After Melissa tells Henderson that her father will fire him, Irene leaves heartbroken. Returning to Gage Mansion, Henderson finds Loomis has died of a heart attack. At the funeral, Freeborn announces he is now the owner of the painting, and Bryant reveals that she plans on marrying Duane. Later, Henderson tells Cora he is going to move back to England, but Cora urges him to take Bryant back to New York City so she does not marry Duane. After Henderson mixes sleeping pills into Bryant’s coffee, Henderson sees Duane burning Loomis’s Renoir painting. Henderson runs outside where Duane insists his father asked him to burn the painting. After forging a break-up note from Bryant to Duane on the back of Irene’s business card, Henderson carries the unconscious Bryant to his car. Shanda appears and convinces Henderson to take her with them. Arriving in New York, Bryant invites Shanda to stay with her and her mother. Henderson goes to his apartment, and is surprised by Freeborn, Sereno and Gint. At gunpoint, they take him to Sereno’s art warehouse. Alone with Freeborn, Henderson confesses that Duane burned the painting. Scared of Sereno and Gint, Freeborn lies and says the painting is in Henderson’s office. Before they leave, Sereno orders Henderson to strip out of his clothes to hinder him from getting away. However, Henderson covers himself with cardboard and escapes. Arriving at his fencing club, he asks Eugene Teagarden for help. After Henderson dons his fencing uniform, Freeborn, Sereno, and Gint arrive with their guns drawn. Henderson and Teagarden disarm the men with their fencing foils, and Henderson informs Sereno that the Renoir was burned. Upset by the loss of the painting, Sereno and Gint chase after Freeborn. Henderson wants to apologize to Irene, and finds her at a nearby diner. As he tells Irene he wants to be with her, Duane arrives looking for Bryant with a gun. Henderson takes Irene’s hand and leads her outside while Duane fires. When Irene asks why they are being shot at, Henderson promises he will explain everything that happened in Georgia sometime later. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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