Innocent Blood (1992)

R | 113 mins | Drama, Romance, Science fiction | 25 September 1992

Director:

John Landis

Writer:

Michael Wolk

Cinematographer:

Mac Ahlberg

Editor:

Dale Beldin

Production Designer:

Richard Sawyer

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

Innocent Blood marked the feature film debut of screenwriter Michael Wolk, and the 15 Jul 1991 HR reported that Lee Rich Productions paid $500,000 for the screenplay to be produced by Lee Rich and Jonathan Sheinberg.
       According to items in the 17 May 1991 Screen International, 28 May 1991 DV and 9 Aug 1991 HR, director Jack Sholder was expected to begin principal photography in Aug 1991 with a cast including Lara Flynn Boyle, Dennis Hopper, Viggo Mortensen, and Miguel Ferrer. However, Sholder left the project, reportedly due to creative differences. An item in the 22 Jul 1991 DV noted that Lara Flynn Boyle chose to leave the film, and Hopper, Mortensen, and Ferrer did not participate in the project.
       Meanwhile, director John Landis had been developing a different vampire film for Warner Bros. titled Red Sleep. When the studio decided not to make that film, they offered Innocent Blood to Landis, and the 9 Aug 1991 HR announced that Anne Parillaud was cast in the lead.
       According to a 19 Jul 1991 HR interview with producer Lee Rich, the budget was approximately $20 million, and principal photography was expected to begin in Oct 1991, probably in New York. However, a 14 Jan 1992 HR production brief reported that principal photography began 13 Jan 1992 in Pittsburgh, PA. The 5 Feb 1992 HR reported a ten week shooting schedule, and the 15 Apr 1992 DV stated principal photography was complete.
       The 2 Oct 1992 Screen International ... More Less

Innocent Blood marked the feature film debut of screenwriter Michael Wolk, and the 15 Jul 1991 HR reported that Lee Rich Productions paid $500,000 for the screenplay to be produced by Lee Rich and Jonathan Sheinberg.
       According to items in the 17 May 1991 Screen International, 28 May 1991 DV and 9 Aug 1991 HR, director Jack Sholder was expected to begin principal photography in Aug 1991 with a cast including Lara Flynn Boyle, Dennis Hopper, Viggo Mortensen, and Miguel Ferrer. However, Sholder left the project, reportedly due to creative differences. An item in the 22 Jul 1991 DV noted that Lara Flynn Boyle chose to leave the film, and Hopper, Mortensen, and Ferrer did not participate in the project.
       Meanwhile, director John Landis had been developing a different vampire film for Warner Bros. titled Red Sleep. When the studio decided not to make that film, they offered Innocent Blood to Landis, and the 9 Aug 1991 HR announced that Anne Parillaud was cast in the lead.
       According to a 19 Jul 1991 HR interview with producer Lee Rich, the budget was approximately $20 million, and principal photography was expected to begin in Oct 1991, probably in New York. However, a 14 Jan 1992 HR production brief reported that principal photography began 13 Jan 1992 in Pittsburgh, PA. The 5 Feb 1992 HR reported a ten week shooting schedule, and the 15 Apr 1992 DV stated principal photography was complete.
       The 2 Oct 1992 Screen International reported the film initially received an NC-17 rating from the Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) rating board. Landis stated that the board’s demand for edits was “completely nonsensical,” but he was under contract to deliver a film with an R rating. Landis cut one scene for sexual content and two scenes for violence. The international version of the film included the deleted forty seconds.
       The film included appearances by directors Dario Argento, Frank Oz, Sam Raimi, and Michael Ritchie. Forrest J. Ackerman, the publisher of Famous Monsters of Filmland, and noted special effects makeup artist Tom Savini were also cast in small roles.
       The cast list includes several actors who appeared in movies viewed by characters in Innocent Blood. The actor’s character names were from the films in which they appeared. Robert Walker portrays “Bruno” in Strangers on a Train (1951, see entry), Alfred Hitchcock is the “man with cello case” from the film 1948 film The Paradine Case (see entry), Bela Lugosi portrayed the title character in Dracula (1931, see entry), and Christopher Lee played “Count Dracula” in Horror of Dracula (1958) alongside Peter Cushing as “Van Helsing.”
       End credits include the following statement: “The filmmakers wish to thank: The city and people of Pittsburgh; Bram Stoker; Rachel Landis; Max Landis.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 May 1991
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Jul 1991.
---
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1991
p. 3, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jul 1991
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 1991
pp. 7-8.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1992
p. 6, 32.
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1992
p. 18.
New York Times
25 Sep 1992
p. 6.
Screen International
17 May 1991.
---
Screen International
2 Oct 1992.
---
Variety
28 Sep 1992
p. 78.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And
as Emmanuel Bergman
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Lee Rich Production
A Landis/Belzberg film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Key grip
Key grip Pittsburgh
Rigging gaffer Pittsburgh
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Still photog
Still photog
Video playback
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept researcher
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadperson
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Gen foreman
Propmaker foreman
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Asst costume des
Cost supv
Key costumer
Key costumer
Asst costumer
Asst costumer
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Orch
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR supv
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff by
Spec visual eff by
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Steve Johnson's XFX, Inc.
Spec eff
Illusion Arts crew
Illusion Arts crew
Illusion Arts crew
Illusion Arts crew
Illusion Arts crew
Title des
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Spec makeup eff
Key makeup
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Asst prod secy
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Transportation coord/Capt
Craft service
Optometrist
Asst to Leslie Belzberg
Asst to Leslie Belzberg
Asst to John Landis
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Pittsburgh casting
Extras casting
STAND INS
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Night,” written by Johnny Lehmann and Herb Miller, performed by Jackie Wilson, courtesy of Brunswick Special Markets, a division of Score Productions, Inc.
“That Old Black Magic,” written by Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with Cema Special Markets
“I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” written by Cole Porter, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with Cema Special Markets
+
SONGS
“Night,” written by Johnny Lehmann and Herb Miller, performed by Jackie Wilson, courtesy of Brunswick Special Markets, a division of Score Productions, Inc.
“That Old Black Magic,” written by Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with Cema Special Markets
“I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” written by Cole Porter, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with Cema Special Markets
Cues from “Horror Of Dracula,” written by James Bernard
“Too Far Gone,” written by O. V. Hirsch, performed by Sturm & Twang, produced by O. V. Hirsch
“Gett Off,” written by Prince Rogers Nelson, performed by Prince & The New Power Generation, courtesy of Paisley Park Records/Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Sexitivity,” written and produced by Carl Sturken and Evan Rogers, performed by Rhythm Syndicate, courtesy of Impact Records
“I Wanna Make Love To You,” written and produced by Carl Sturken and Evan Rogers, performed by Rhythm Syndicate, courtesy of Impact Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 September 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 September 1992
Production Date:
13 January--mid April 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP
Copyright Date:
1 February 1993
Copyright Number:
PA599603
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31965
SYNOPSIS

In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, vampire Marie quenches her thirst for blood by killing criminals. One night, she targets associates of mobster Sal “The Shark” Macelli and crosses paths with Joe Gennaro, a police officer working undercover for three years, infiltrating Macelli’s organization. When Joe is kind to her, she turns her attention to another mobster, Tony. He drives her to a remote spot, believing they are going to have sex, and is surprised when Marie rips his throat apart and drinks his blood. Afterward, she shoots him to hide teeth marks and to disconnect his central nervous system, making sure he will not turn into a vampire and remain dead. The next morning, Joe arrives at the crime scene and learns that Tony lost more than five quarts of blood that cannot be accounted. Tony mentored Joe in the Macelli family, and Joe worries that Tony’s death will jeopardize his mission. U.S. Attorney Sinclair is angry to discover him at the murder scene. However, she declares that Joe has enough evidence to arrest Macelli, and she will put him under protection until the trial. As Joe protests, Sinclair reveals Joe’s undercover operation to the assembled reporters. When Macelli’s lawyer, Emmanuel Bergman, warns the mob boss that he will soon be arrested, Macelli orders his men to kill Joe Gennaro. That evening, Marie flirts with Macelli as he approaches his limousine, and he takes her to his home for supper. As he unpacks the take-out Italian food, Marie becomes sickened at the smell of garlic and excuses herself to the bathroom. When Macelli joins her, Marie is repulsed ... +


In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, vampire Marie quenches her thirst for blood by killing criminals. One night, she targets associates of mobster Sal “The Shark” Macelli and crosses paths with Joe Gennaro, a police officer working undercover for three years, infiltrating Macelli’s organization. When Joe is kind to her, she turns her attention to another mobster, Tony. He drives her to a remote spot, believing they are going to have sex, and is surprised when Marie rips his throat apart and drinks his blood. Afterward, she shoots him to hide teeth marks and to disconnect his central nervous system, making sure he will not turn into a vampire and remain dead. The next morning, Joe arrives at the crime scene and learns that Tony lost more than five quarts of blood that cannot be accounted. Tony mentored Joe in the Macelli family, and Joe worries that Tony’s death will jeopardize his mission. U.S. Attorney Sinclair is angry to discover him at the murder scene. However, she declares that Joe has enough evidence to arrest Macelli, and she will put him under protection until the trial. As Joe protests, Sinclair reveals Joe’s undercover operation to the assembled reporters. When Macelli’s lawyer, Emmanuel Bergman, warns the mob boss that he will soon be arrested, Macelli orders his men to kill Joe Gennaro. That evening, Marie flirts with Macelli as he approaches his limousine, and he takes her to his home for supper. As he unpacks the take-out Italian food, Marie becomes sickened at the smell of garlic and excuses herself to the bathroom. When Macelli joins her, Marie is repulsed by the garlic on his breath and backs away. Infuriated, Macelli demands sex and attacks her. Marie bites his neck, and he shoots her as he falls into the tub. Macelli’s limousine driver, Lenny, hears the gunshot and sees Marie’s blood-covered face through the window. Marie escapes as Lenny rushes inside and finds Macelli’s body. Joe Gennaro learns of Macelli’s death, rushes to the crime scene, and notes similarities to Tony’s murder. Lenny and Emmanuel Bergman are present, but Lenny refuses to answer Joe’s questions and they fight. Joe searches the area, and follows footprints to a nearby roof where Marie is hiding. She runs past him, jumps off the roof, and gets away. Marie breaks into a nearby rectory and showers off the blood, then steals clothing from a nearby thrift shop. Joe tracks her to the store, but her eyes glow as she warns him to stay away or she will kill him, and then she escapes. At the morgue, the coroner begins the autopsy as Macelli sits up and learns that he is “dead.” Covered with blood, the “undead” Macelli staggers out of the building, steals a car, and speeds to his lawyer’s home. Joe Gennaro hears on his police radio that Macelli is apparently alive. Listening from a nearby roof, Marie jumps on Joe’s car and forces him to help her find Macelli. She reveals that the mobster is not dead because she was interrupted by Lenny, and did not finish killing Macelli. If he feeds on blood, Macelli will become a vampire, too. Joe does not trust her, and when they meet with other officers to obtain information, he sneaks away after discovering that Macelli is at Bergman’s home. By the time Joe arrives, Macelli has assembled his lawyer and two gangsters. Marie, who followed Joe, watches as he is captured and tossed in a car trunk. Inside the house, Macelli bites Bergman’s throat, then leaves with his men. Mrs. Bergman screams for help as police officers arrive and they rush inside. Marie steals the police car and chases Macelli’s limousine to the docks,where they plan to kill Joe. She rescues Joe, but Macelli escapes. As they give chase, she chastises Joe for going after Macelli alone, noting that she could have stopped Macelli before he fed on blood and became more dangerous. She notices it is almost daylight, and quickly veers from the chase to check them into a motel room before the sun rises. Macelli’s skin smokes as the sun appears, and he speeds into one of his meat-packing plants to rest inside the freezer. At the hospital, Bergman is revived as a vampire, and moves to attack the unsuspecting nurse as she pulls back the curtains. However, daylight hits Bergman and he burns to death. At the motel, Joe is wary of Marie, but cannot deny their growing attraction, and they have sex. That night, Lenny brings two of Macelli’s associates, Frankie and Ray, to the meat locker, and Macelli turns them into vampires. Later, Macelli goes to his office above the Melody Lounge to build his new empire of “made men” vampires. Marie and Joe track Macelli to the lounge, and battle his vampire mobsters, killing some with gunshots to the head or broken necks. When they find Macelli on the roof, Marie’s gun is out of bullets. Macelli shoots her several times, then jumps off the roof, laughing as he is hit by both a bus and a car. Joe and Marie rush to the street, and Macelli insists they cannot kill him. Joe notices Macelli is standing in gasoline and tosses his lighter to start a fire. Engulfed in flames, Macelli storms toward them, and Joe shoots the mobster in the head, killing him. The sun rises, and Marie walks toward the light, intending to die. However, Joe admits that he loves her, and they check into a hotel together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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