Night and the City (1992)

R | 104 mins | Drama | 11 October 1992

Director:

Irwin Winkler

Writer:

Richard Price

Cinematographer:

Tak Fujimoto

Editor:

David Brenner

Production Designer:

Peter Larkin

Production Company:

Twentieth Century Fox
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HISTORY

The 4 May 1984 DV announced that Martin Scorsese was preparing to direct a remake of the 1950 film, Night and the City (see entry), for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM), in partnership with longtime agent-manager Harry J. Ufland and his producing partner, Joe Roth. After a six year delay, the 25 Jan 1990 DV reported that Joe Roth had been named the new chairman at Twentieth Century Fox, and listed Night and the City as one of his upcoming projects, with actor Tom Hanks cast in the lead role. The 23 Jun 1990 Screen International named Mike Figgis as the director. The 27 Jun 1990 DV explained that after taking over at Fox in Aug 1989, Roth remembered Richard Price’s screenplay, which was originally created for Ufland/Roth years before. He was awaiting rewrites and for Tom Hanks’s schedule to clear before announcing the start of production. More than a year later, however, the 9 Aug 1991 Screen International announced that Irwin Winkler would be directing, and Robert De Niro was replacing Hanks. The picture marked the second feature film directed by Winkler. According to the 1 Oct 1992 HR, Al Pacino was in consideration for the lead at one point.
       The 9 Sep 1991 Var reported that Fox had partnered with Penta Entertainment, who provided $10.5 million, more than half of the film’s $20 million budget.
       Principal photography began on 4 Nov 1991 in New Yok City, according to the 27 Nov 1991 DV. Production notes in AMPAS library files list locations in Greenwich Village, Soho, Little Italy, Coney Island, ... More Less

The 4 May 1984 DV announced that Martin Scorsese was preparing to direct a remake of the 1950 film, Night and the City (see entry), for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM), in partnership with longtime agent-manager Harry J. Ufland and his producing partner, Joe Roth. After a six year delay, the 25 Jan 1990 DV reported that Joe Roth had been named the new chairman at Twentieth Century Fox, and listed Night and the City as one of his upcoming projects, with actor Tom Hanks cast in the lead role. The 23 Jun 1990 Screen International named Mike Figgis as the director. The 27 Jun 1990 DV explained that after taking over at Fox in Aug 1989, Roth remembered Richard Price’s screenplay, which was originally created for Ufland/Roth years before. He was awaiting rewrites and for Tom Hanks’s schedule to clear before announcing the start of production. More than a year later, however, the 9 Aug 1991 Screen International announced that Irwin Winkler would be directing, and Robert De Niro was replacing Hanks. The picture marked the second feature film directed by Winkler. According to the 1 Oct 1992 HR, Al Pacino was in consideration for the lead at one point.
       The 9 Sep 1991 Var reported that Fox had partnered with Penta Entertainment, who provided $10.5 million, more than half of the film’s $20 million budget.
       Principal photography began on 4 Nov 1991 in New Yok City, according to the 27 Nov 1991 DV. Production notes in AMPAS library files list locations in Greenwich Village, Soho, Little Italy, Coney Island, and the 42nd Street Gym. Winkler used actual locations, and ordered no sets to be built, as noted in the 2 Oct 1992 HR. Therefore, sequences in Boxers Bar-Restaurant in Greenwich Village and Helen’s Blue Dolphin bar were filmed on actual sites, according to the 26 Jul 1992 LAT.
       The 5 Oct 1992 HR announced that the picture was completed in fifty days, and $250,000-$300,00 under budget, at $18 million.
       The film screened at the 1992 New York Film Festival on 11 Oct 1992, as its closing night entry. The 26 Aug 1992 LAT announced the picture would premiere in Los Angeles on 15 Oct 1992 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, as part of a month-long tribute to Irwin Winkler. According to the 1 Oct 1992 HR, the picture would be released at one New York City theater on 16 Oct 1992, before opening in more than 950 theaters on 23 Oct 1992.
       The film concludes with the following title card: “Dedicated to Jules Dassin; based on his film Night and the City ; screenplay by Jo Eisinger; from the novel by Gerald Kersh.” End credits also acknowledge: “The producers wish to thank the New York City Mayor’s Office for Film, Television and Broadcasting and the Movie and T.V. unit of the New York Police Department.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 May 1984
p. 1, 24.
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1990
p. 1, 44.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1990
p. 1, 25.
Daily Variety
30 Oct 1991.
---
Daily Variety
27 Nov 1991.
---
Daily Variety
12 Oct 1992
p. 2, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 1992
p. 5, 16.
Los Angeles Times
11 Mar 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jul 1992.
p. 19, 25-27, 30.
Los Angeles Times
2 Sep 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Aug 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Oct 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
10 Oct 1992
p. 1, 11.
Screen International
23 Jun 1990.
---
Screen International
9 Aug 1991.
---
Variety
9 Sep 1991.
---
Variety
12 Oct 1992
p. 186.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Twentieth Century Fox presents
In association with Penta Entertainment
A Tribeca production
A film by Irwin Winkler
Produced and released by Twentieth Century Fox
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Best boy
Elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Still photog
Video playback
Loc package provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed - New York
2d asst ed - Los Angeles
Apprentice ed - New York
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Key set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Chief carpenter
Carpenter
Const grip
Chargeman scenic artist
Standby scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward asst
Asst to the cost des
Ms. Lange's ward des by
Asst to Ms. Aldredge
Selected men's ward by
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Scoring coord
Mus supv
Mus contractor
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ed
Digital eff rec
Addl audio
Addl audio
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR group
ADR mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
Eng
Pro sd transfers by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles des by
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup and hair (Mr. De Niro)
Makeup (Ms. Lange)
Makeup artist
Hairstylist (Ms. Lange)
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Ms. Rosenthal
Asst to Mr. De Niro
Asst to Mr. De Niro
Asst to Mr. Winkler
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Transportation capt
Asst transportation capt
Unit pub
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Principal casting asst
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Post prod accountant
Prod assoc
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Prod asst to Mr. De Niro
Craft service
Shop mgr
Parking coord
Completion guaranty provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Processing by
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the film Night and the City written by Jo Eisinger (Twentieth Century-Fox, 1950) from the novel Night and the City by Gerald Kersh (London, 1938).
SONGS
“Wooly Bully,” written by Sam Samudio, performed by Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution
“I’ll Always Love You,” written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, performed by Dean Martin, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“I Wanna Be The One,” written by Gardner Cole and James Newton Howard, performed by Ripley Fairchild
+
SONGS
“Wooly Bully,” written by Sam Samudio, performed by Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution
“I’ll Always Love You,” written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, performed by Dean Martin, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“I Wanna Be The One,” written by Gardner Cole and James Newton Howard, performed by Ripley Fairchild
“Love Doesn't Matter,” written by Gardner Cole and James Newton Howard, performed by Rodney Saulsberry
“You Really Got A Hold On Me,” written by William Robinson, performed by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, courtesy of Motown Record Company L. P., under license from Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution
“Money (That's What I Want),” written by Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford, performed by Jr. Walker & the All-Stars, courtesy of Motown Record Company L. P., under license from Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution
“I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You),” written by Ronnie Shannon, performed by Aretha Franklin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Freaky Styley,” written by Anthony Kiedis, Michael Balzary and Cliff Martinez, performed by The Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of EMI Records Group/EMI Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Forgiveness,” written by Dennis Matkosky, performed by Lynn Davis
“Straight To The Top,” written by Gardner Cole, performed by Green Eyes
“Deep Water,” written by Dennis Matkosky and Darrell Brown, performed by Bill Champlin
“Never Gonna Stop,” written by Gardner Cole and James Newton Howard, performed by Gardner Cole, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“Whatcha Gonna Do About It,” written by Vini Poncia and Alfredo Scotti, performed by Stone Cherry
“Shoulder To Shoulder,” written by Vini Poncia and Alfredo Scotti, performed by Stone Cherry
“What’d I Say,” written and performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Cool Jerk,” written by Donald Storball, performed by The Capitols, courtesy of Dominion Entertainment, Inc.
“The Great Pretender,” written by Buck Ram, performed by The Platters, courtesy of Highland Music, Inc.
“The Great Pretender,” written by Buck Ram, performed by Freddie Mercury, courtesy of Mercury Songs Ltd., Hollywood Records and EMI Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 October 1992
Premiere Information:
New York Film Festival screening: 11 October 1992
New York opening: 16 October 1992
Los Angeles opening: 23 October 1992
Production Date:
began 4 November 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
23 September 1992
Copyright Number:
PA582582
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
104
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30996
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

New York City attorney Harry Fabian brazenly pursues new clients. After reading about a nightclub bar fight between professional boxer Cuda Sanchez and a man named Emmet Gorgon, Harry telephones Emmet and tries to convince him to file a lawsuit against Sanchez. Insisting the boxer’s hands are “registered weapons,” Harry promises Emmet a big payoff. Harry frequents a bar called “Boxers,” where he befriends owner Phil, and his waitress wife, Helen, with whom he is having a secret love affair. Later, Harry and Helen have sex on the street, barely hidden in a doorway. She tells him that she is thinking about moving to California, but Harry insists she could never live elsewhere. In time, Phil warns Harry against suing Cuda Sanchez, as he is represented by a ruthless promoter named “Boom Boom” Grossman, but Harry is unconvinced. Upon meeting Emmet Gorgon, Harry instructs him to claim that his injuries are worse than they are, and sends him to a doctor who will vouch for the lie. At Boxers, Harry tells his news reporter friend, Tommy Tessler, that he is charging Cuda Sanchez with assault. Warning him to drop the case, Tommy publishes the story, and Boom Boom Grossman threatens Harry. Sometime later, Harry goes to a boxing gym to speak with Cuda Sanchez, and try to make a deal. Sanchez is not there, but Harry meets the gym owner and becomes inspired by his stories of old-time fights that occurred in the neighborhood. When he learns that Boom Boom’s brother, Al Grossman, was a champion fighter who trained at the gym before retiring, Harry decides to track him down. Later, he fills out paperwork to become a boxing ... +


New York City attorney Harry Fabian brazenly pursues new clients. After reading about a nightclub bar fight between professional boxer Cuda Sanchez and a man named Emmet Gorgon, Harry telephones Emmet and tries to convince him to file a lawsuit against Sanchez. Insisting the boxer’s hands are “registered weapons,” Harry promises Emmet a big payoff. Harry frequents a bar called “Boxers,” where he befriends owner Phil, and his waitress wife, Helen, with whom he is having a secret love affair. Later, Harry and Helen have sex on the street, barely hidden in a doorway. She tells him that she is thinking about moving to California, but Harry insists she could never live elsewhere. In time, Phil warns Harry against suing Cuda Sanchez, as he is represented by a ruthless promoter named “Boom Boom” Grossman, but Harry is unconvinced. Upon meeting Emmet Gorgon, Harry instructs him to claim that his injuries are worse than they are, and sends him to a doctor who will vouch for the lie. At Boxers, Harry tells his news reporter friend, Tommy Tessler, that he is charging Cuda Sanchez with assault. Warning him to drop the case, Tommy publishes the story, and Boom Boom Grossman threatens Harry. Sometime later, Harry goes to a boxing gym to speak with Cuda Sanchez, and try to make a deal. Sanchez is not there, but Harry meets the gym owner and becomes inspired by his stories of old-time fights that occurred in the neighborhood. When he learns that Boom Boom’s brother, Al Grossman, was a champion fighter who trained at the gym before retiring, Harry decides to track him down. Later, he fills out paperwork to become a boxing promoter, and tells Tommy Tessler about his plans to rent an arena and recreate the neighborhood boxing events that took place in the 1930s. Harry’s case against Sanchez goes to trial, but the judge sees through Harry’s scheme and demands he leave the courtroom. Although he suffered a humiliating loss, Harry buys Boom Boom a drink at Boxers, and tells him he has become a promoter. Boom Boom is not amused, and orders Harry not to get into the business. Harry retaliates by searching for Boom Boom’s estranged brother, Al Grossman, at a retirement center on Coney Island. He tells Al his plan, and asks for help to scout talented fighters. Without much coaxing, Al agrees. Later, Harry asks Phil to invest $15,000 in the event, then subtly insults his friend for refusing. Helen leaps to her husband’s defense, demanding that Harry raise half of the money on his own, which Phil will match. Harry leaves in anger, and asks every businessman he knows to invest, but is turned down. However, a man named Mr. Peck tells Harry he will lend him the money in no one else will. Sometime later, Helen goes to Harry’s apartment and apologizes for their argument. She has decided not to move to California, and wants to buy her own bar instead. She asks Harry to use his connections to help her illegally obtain a liquor license, which she cannot get on her own because of a previous felony conviction, and gives him $5,000. Helen also gives him $7,500 of her own savings, so he can prove to Phil that he raised enough money to warrant matching funds. She offers Harry a partnership in the bar, but he declines, opting to pursue his new venture as a boxing promoter. In time, Harry fails to obtain a legal liquor license for Helen, but pays a forger to create one. Phil is surprised when Harry presents his half of the money. He hesitates to give Harry his matching sum, promising to give it to him later. In the meantime, Harry and Al Grossman make a deal with a nightclub to hold the boxing event. Boom Boom becomes irate at the sight of Harry with his brother, resulting in a heated argument. Afterward, Boom Boom offers Harry a payoff to get him out of the promoting business, but Harry refuses, saying that he regrets having taken the easy way out in the past. Before leaving, Boom Boom tells Harry about Al’s heart condition, and threatens to kill him if anything happens to his brother. As Harry and Al scout boxers at the gym, Helen tells Phil she is leaving him, and he punches her in the face. She refuses to answer his questions about how she got the liquor license for her new bar, and flees. Later, Harry finds her on his doorstep, and seeing her bruised face, suggests she go to California as planned. Cuda Sanchez watches them from across the street, and reports their affair to Boom Boom, who, in turn, informs Phil. Meanwhile, Harry commissions a printer to create a poster announcing the return of “People’s Boxing” in New York. Six days before the fight, nightclub owner Resnick raises his costs and demands the money in advance. Harry leaves in anger, unsure if he will be able to pay. He asks Helen for a loan, but she has nothing left, and suggests he ask Phil. Unaware that Phil has learned of his affair, Harry goes to Boxers and tells him they have to cancel the event because he cannot afford to pay for the venue. Phil offers to cover the $12,000 in costs, and also to throw a party for his twelve boxers on the night before the fight. Harry is thrilled, and feigns ignorance when Phil tells him that Helen left him. During the party for Harry’s fighters, Phil informs him there is a delay with his money, but promises he will have it in time. On the morning of the boxing event, Helen arrives unannounced at Harry’s apartment, and thanks him for his help with her bar, which is set to open later that day. She gives him a necklace with two silver boxing glove charms, and Harry is touched by the gesture. Later, Phil tells Harry that he knows about his affair with Helen, and beats him. Desperate for money, Harry visits his associate, Mr. Peck, who gives him $12,000. Elsewhere, as Al Grossman sets up the venue, he gets into a fight with one of the staff, and suffers a heart attack. Harry arrives and desperately tries to save him, but Al does not revive. Harry paces the streets, wondering how he will explain Al’s death to Boom Boom. Later, Harry discovers that Helen was forced out of business after Phil reported her to authorities, and her forged liquor license was discovered. Harry apologizes, offering to give her every cent of his fight money. He also tells her that Al Grossman died and that he cancelled the event. Helen refuses the money, and invites Harry to come with her to California, but he insists that he is tired of running away. When Boom Boom’s men arrive, Harry and Helen flee. The thugs pursue them into an alley with guns drawn, and when they discover Helen, Harry leaps to her defense. He explains that he desperately fought to save Al’s life, and throws Peck’s money into the air, hoping that will be enough to save him. As Harry tries to get away, he is shot in the back and falls to the ground, asking in vain if that makes them even. Helen comforts Harry while they wait for an ambulance. As Harry is placed on a gurney, he rambles about living in Big Sur, California, with Helen. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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