Addams Family Values (1993)

PG-13 | 103 mins | Comedy, Fantasy | 19 November 1993

Director:

Barry Sonnenfeld

Writer:

Paul Rudnick

Producer:

Scott Rudin

Cinematographer:

Donald Peterman

Production Designer:

Ken Adam

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

       According to the 18 Dec 1991 HR, Paramount Pictures considered the possibility of creating a sequel to The Addams Family (see entry) prior to its 22 Nov 1991 release, but did not confirm plans until learning of the film’s successful box-office returns. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that this was the first feature-length motion picture screenplay written by Paul Rudnick, who worked on rewrites of The Addams Family script in an uncredited position.
       The 12 Jan 1993 DV announced that Joan Cusack had been cast as “Debbie Jellinski” after the 18 Jan 1993 issue of People magazine reported that Kathleen Turner previously turned down the role. In addition, Carol Kane replaced Judith Malina in the role of “Granny,” due to the character’s more physically demanding role in the sequel.
       A 15 Dec 1992 HR brief listed the production start date as 1 Feb 1993, but the 17 Feb 1993 DV “Short Takes” column confirmed that principal photography began a week later, on 8 Feb 1993, in Los Angeles, CA. Production notes stated that filming took place at Linda Vista Hospital, the Long Beach, CA, airport, and private homes in Pasadena and Palos Verdes, CA. Exterior “Camp Chippewa” scenes were shot at the Sequoia National Forest in Springville, CA.
       A Dec 1993 Us magazine brief stated that Anjelica Huston’s makeup application took two hours each day, which, according to publicity materials, included face lifts to re-shape her eyes. The announcement also noted that Cusack wore upper and lower dentures to correct her teeth and re-structure her jaw, while ... More Less

       According to the 18 Dec 1991 HR, Paramount Pictures considered the possibility of creating a sequel to The Addams Family (see entry) prior to its 22 Nov 1991 release, but did not confirm plans until learning of the film’s successful box-office returns. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that this was the first feature-length motion picture screenplay written by Paul Rudnick, who worked on rewrites of The Addams Family script in an uncredited position.
       The 12 Jan 1993 DV announced that Joan Cusack had been cast as “Debbie Jellinski” after the 18 Jan 1993 issue of People magazine reported that Kathleen Turner previously turned down the role. In addition, Carol Kane replaced Judith Malina in the role of “Granny,” due to the character’s more physically demanding role in the sequel.
       A 15 Dec 1992 HR brief listed the production start date as 1 Feb 1993, but the 17 Feb 1993 DV “Short Takes” column confirmed that principal photography began a week later, on 8 Feb 1993, in Los Angeles, CA. Production notes stated that filming took place at Linda Vista Hospital, the Long Beach, CA, airport, and private homes in Pasadena and Palos Verdes, CA. Exterior “Camp Chippewa” scenes were shot at the Sequoia National Forest in Springville, CA.
       A Dec 1993 Us magazine brief stated that Anjelica Huston’s makeup application took two hours each day, which, according to publicity materials, included face lifts to re-shape her eyes. The announcement also noted that Cusack wore upper and lower dentures to correct her teeth and re-structure her jaw, while Christopher Lloyd wore dental plumpers to accommodate for the weight he lost since production of the first film. Although he is not listed in the onscreen credits, Dr. Henry Yamada completed Lloyd’s dental work. A 24 Nov 1993 LAT “Screen Style” column stated that costumes were custom made in Los Angeles and New York City costume houses, respectively owned by Bill Hargate and Barbara Matera, who are not credited onscreen.
       A 23 Nov 1993 LAT article stated that Alterion Studios, Inc. in Irwindale, CA, handled many of the special effects, including the construction of the mechanical “Baby What,” and the explosion of a sixteen-by-twenty-eight foot “miniature” model of the mansion owned by Debbie and “Fester Addams.” For the scene in which “Wednesday Addams” is camouflaged against a wall, Alterion head Tony Gardner created a plaster model of Christina Ricci’s body which was then painted to match the set, thus eliminating the need for full makeup. The 18-24 Nov 1993 Drama-Logue explained that the creation of the seemingly disembodied hand, “Thing,” was achieved by painting magician-actor Christopher Hart’s arm black and fitting him with a rubber wrist piece. Each of his scenes was shot twice—once with Hart present in front of the camera and once without. In post-production, filmmakers digitally erased Hart’s body from the frame and re-printed the footage with only his hand remaining in the shot. The 30 Nov 1993 HR referred to the process as “computer matting,” which was overseen by VCE digital/optical effects artist Peter Kuran.
       According to the 30 Nov 1993 HR, computer support technician Frank Dutro, Jr., used Mac Quadra computers to scan production drawings into Special Delivery software, transforming the two-dimensional images into an interactive version of the Addams family mansion, which was used to plan out movements of the actors and cameras before production began. A 31 Mar 1993 HR article stated that due to Barry Sonnenfeld’s prolonged editing time on For Love or Money (1993, see entry), preproduction of Addams Family Values was shortened from nearly four months to just seven weeks. By using computers, filmmakers were able to input and store the script, schedules, budgets, and visual effects storyboards, helping to minimize production costs and time overruns. Two days after principal photography began, the production schedule was rearranged when rain threatened to cause delays. In addition, computer artist Bruce Wright used Adobe Photoshop to digitally paint details onto images of the Pasadena house selected for exteriors. The total budget was estimated at $47 million, most of which was spent on the actors’ salaries, with $4 million allocated for visual effects.
       Although the 18 Dec 1991 HR indicated that Paramount initially intended to “cash in” on Halloween-related merchandise tie-ins by scheduling an Oct 1992 release date, the film was rescheduled for Thanksgiving of the following year, opening on 17 Nov 1993. A 21 May 1993 DV article reported that the studio launched a $100 million joint advertising campaign with McDonald’s for Addams Family Values and Wayne’s World 2 (1993, see entry). In addition, both films were cross-promoted through the home video sales of their predecessors, The Addams Family and Wayne’s World (1992, see entry).
       The 17 Oct 1993 LAT stated that soundtrack album producer, Ralph Sal, originally approached Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead to record the film’s theme, but Paramount chose to use the more contemporary hip-hop duo, Tag Team, who wrote “Addams Family (Whoomp!)” by incorporating Vic Mizzy’s The Addams Family television show (ABC, 18 Sep 1964—2 Sep 1966) theme into their popular 1992 song, “Whoomp! (There It Is).” A 3 Sep 1993 HR article stated that Michael Jackson was hired to create a song and perform in an accompanying ten-minute music video written by novelist Stephen King and produced by the film’s executive producer, David Nicksay. A 20 Sep 1993 Time magazine brief estimated the total cost at nearly $5 million, $1.5 million of which would be provided by Paramount, with the remainder covered by Jackson’s company, MJJ. Sets were flown to Japan, since Jackson intended to complete the video while on his concert tour. Four days into the eight-to-ten day schedule, however, Jackson terminated his participation, claiming illness and a “legal dispute” with the studio. A few days later, Jackson was accused of child molestation, forcing Paramount to consider replacing him so that the video could be completed in time to be re-cut for the film’s trailer. Despite the article’s suggestion that litigation would ensue, it has not been determined if Paramount went forth with any legal action. As stated in a 29 Nov 1993 Var news item, the filmmakers referenced the molestation charges by including a scene in which the character “Joel Glicker” screams upon seeing a poster of Jackson inside the summer camp’s “Harmony Hut.”
       Despite mixed reviews, the film earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Art Direction, and a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress (Comedy or Musical) for Anjelica Huston.
      End credits state: “The Producer and Director wish to gratefully acknowledge the consulting services and assistance of The Lady Colyton in the making of his film,” and, “The Producers wish to thank: William Sherak; the estate of Theodore Geisel; Apple Computer, Inc.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1993.
---
Daily Variety
17 Feb 1993.
---
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1993
p. 3, 14.
Daily Variety
21 May 1993
p. 1, 28.
Drama-Logue
18-24 Nov 1993
pp. 4-7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1991
p. 1, 21.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1993
p. 3, 32.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1993
p. 6, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 1993
pp. 69-70.
Los Angeles Times
17 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Nov 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
23 Nov 1993
Section F, p. 1, 5.
Los Angeles Times
24 Nov 1993.
---
New York Times
19 Nov 1993
Section C, p. 3.
People
18 Jan 1993.
---
Time
20 Sep 1993.
---
Us
Dec 1993.
---
Variety
29 Nov 1993
p. 31.
Variety
29 Nov 1993.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Scott Rudin Production
A Barry Sonnenfeld Film
A Paramount Pictures Presentation
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Chief rigging elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Video playback eng
Remote crane supplied by
Cranes and dollies provided by
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
1st asst photog, Visual eff unit
2d asst photog, Visual eff unit
Chief lighting tech, Visual eff unit
Asst chief lighting tech, Visual eff unit
1st company grip, Visual eff unit
2d company grip, Visual eff unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Set dresser
Const coord
Const gen supv
Greensperson
Prop master, Visual eff unit
COSTUMES
Assoc cost des
Assoc cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Ward, Visual eff unit
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
Orch cond by
Mus preparation
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableperson
Sd supv
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Pubert's voice
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff coord
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreperson
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
Title des
Title des
Assoc supv, Visual eff unit
Key visual eff asst, Visual eff unit
Visual eff prod, Visual eff unit
Prosthetic coord, Visual eff unit
Coord, Visual eff unit
Consultant, Visual eff unit
Prod supv, Visual eff unit
Spec eff, Visual eff unit
Spec eff, Visual eff unit
Eff photog, Visual eff unit
Eff photog, Visual eff unit
Digital/Opt visual eff
Digital/Opt visual eff, VCE
VCE supv
VCE opt supv
VCE digital supv
VCE anim
VCE anim
VCE anim
VCE opt
VCE opt
VCE opt
VCE opt
VCE opt
VCE digital
VCE editorial
VCE eff photog
VCE eff photog
VCE prod coord
VCE admin
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
"Thing" and "Pubert" puppets and prosthetics creat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Spec prosthetics, mechanical eff, and house miniat
Motion control photog by
Stop motion
Matte paintings by
Matte paintings by
Matte paintings by
Matte artist
Matte photog
DANCE
Tango choreog
Chroeog--Camp Chippewa
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Anjelica Huston's makeup by
Anjelica Huston's hairstylist
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Supv hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Makeup, Visual eff unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Associate
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Sonnenfeld
Voice casting
Orch contractor
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Ms. Huston
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Computer support
Computer support
Computer support
Casting asst
Extra casting
Loc extra casting
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Transportation capt, Visual eff unit
Transportation capt, Visual eff unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the characters created by Charles Addams.
MUSIC
"The Addams Family Theme," by Vic Mizzy.
SONGS
"Disgusting Crime Theme," written and performed by D. Brent Nelson
"Tie A Yellow Ribbon 'Round The Old Oak Tree," by Irwin Levine and Larry Brown
"Express Yourself," by Charles W. Wright, additional lyric by Fu-Schnickens, performed by Roger and Fu-Schnickens, produced by Ralph Sall, Roger performs courtesy of Reprise Records, Fu-Schnickens performs courtesy of Jive Records
+
SONGS
"Disgusting Crime Theme," written and performed by D. Brent Nelson
"Tie A Yellow Ribbon 'Round The Old Oak Tree," by Irwin Levine and Larry Brown
"Express Yourself," by Charles W. Wright, additional lyric by Fu-Schnickens, performed by Roger and Fu-Schnickens, produced by Ralph Sall, Roger performs courtesy of Reprise Records, Fu-Schnickens performs courtesy of Jive Records
"Sunrise, Sunset," by Shelton Harnick and Jerry Bock
"Happy Turkey Day," by Marc Shaiman and Paul Rudnick
"The Brady Bunch," by Frank DeVol and Sherwood Schwartz, performed by The Brady Bunch
"The Sound Of Music," by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, performed by Julie Andrews, courtesy of The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization
"Tomorrow," by Martin Charnin and Charles Strouse
"Eat Us," by Marc Shaiman and Paul Rudnick
"Macho Man," by Henry Belolo, Jacques Morali, Victor Willis and Peter Whitehead, performed by Village People, courtesy of Scorpio Music and Polygram Special Markets
"Happy Birthday To You," by Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill
"Addams Family (Whoomp!)," by Ralph Sall, Steve (Roll'n) Gibson and Cecil (DC) Glenn, performed by Tag Team, produced by Ralph Sall, includes "The Addams Family Theme" by Vic Mizzy, Tag Team performs courtesy of Bellmark/Life Records
"Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get," by Tony Hester, performed by RuPaul, produced by Ralph Sall, RuPaul performs courtesy of Tommy Boy, Inc.
"Do It Any Way You Wanna (It's On You)," by Leon Huff, additional lyric by Keith Elam, performed by Guru, produced by Ralph Sall, Guru performs courtesy of Chrysalis Records.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 November 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 November 1993
New York opening: week of 19 November 1993
Production Date:
began 8 February 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
8 December 1993
Copyright Number:
PA677933
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral recording Dolby Stereo Digital
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
103
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32260
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As the eccentrically morbid members of the Addams family congregate at their Gothic manor, devoted patriarch Gomez brings his wife, Morticia, to the hospital for the birth of their third child, Pubert. Jealous of the attention their parents are giving the newborn baby, adolescents Wednesday and Pugsley drop Pubert from the roof of the house, but Gomez catches the falling infant from his bedroom window. Although Gomez and his elder brother, Fester, assure the children that sibling rivalry is natural, the children continuously attempt to murder their brother. Gomez and Morticia interview numerous fearful applicants before hiring an energetic nanny named Deborah “Debbie” Jellinsky. The lonesome Fester is instantly smitten, unaware that she is the “Black Widow,” a serial murderess plotting to marry and kill him for the Addams family fortune. When Wednesday grows suspicious of Debbie’s intentions, Debbie has the children sent to Camp Chippewa, led by the peppy Gary and Becky Granger. Back at the Addams house, Fester summons the courage to ask Debbie on a double date with Morticia and Gomez, but struggles to overcome his shyness. After dinner, Debbie tells Fester that she loves him, but claims to be a virgin and refuses to consummate their relationship until they are married, prompting him to propose. When Wednesday reacts poorly to the news of her uncle’s engagement, Gary and Becky banish her and Pugsley to the “Harmony Hut,” an isolated cabin filled with stuffed animals and games, to “correct” her dour attitude. There, the siblings are locked inside with a neurotic and bookish camper named Joel Glicker. When the trio are caught trying to escape the campgrounds, Gary, Becky, and the other campers cheerfully sing to ... +


As the eccentrically morbid members of the Addams family congregate at their Gothic manor, devoted patriarch Gomez brings his wife, Morticia, to the hospital for the birth of their third child, Pubert. Jealous of the attention their parents are giving the newborn baby, adolescents Wednesday and Pugsley drop Pubert from the roof of the house, but Gomez catches the falling infant from his bedroom window. Although Gomez and his elder brother, Fester, assure the children that sibling rivalry is natural, the children continuously attempt to murder their brother. Gomez and Morticia interview numerous fearful applicants before hiring an energetic nanny named Deborah “Debbie” Jellinsky. The lonesome Fester is instantly smitten, unaware that she is the “Black Widow,” a serial murderess plotting to marry and kill him for the Addams family fortune. When Wednesday grows suspicious of Debbie’s intentions, Debbie has the children sent to Camp Chippewa, led by the peppy Gary and Becky Granger. Back at the Addams house, Fester summons the courage to ask Debbie on a double date with Morticia and Gomez, but struggles to overcome his shyness. After dinner, Debbie tells Fester that she loves him, but claims to be a virgin and refuses to consummate their relationship until they are married, prompting him to propose. When Wednesday reacts poorly to the news of her uncle’s engagement, Gary and Becky banish her and Pugsley to the “Harmony Hut,” an isolated cabin filled with stuffed animals and games, to “correct” her dour attitude. There, the siblings are locked inside with a neurotic and bookish camper named Joel Glicker. When the trio are caught trying to escape the campgrounds, Gary, Becky, and the other campers cheerfully sing to them. Attracted to Joel’s hypochondria, Wednesday invites him to accompany her to Fester’s wedding, which the children are allowed to attend. The family reunites for the graveyard ceremony, officiated by their hair-covered relative, Cousin Itt. After the vows, Wednesday catches Debbie’s bouquet as the couple rushes to begin their honeymoon. In their Hawaiian hotel room, Debbie attempts to electrocute Fester by dropping a stereo into his bubble bath, but Fester is unharmed and remains unaware of her murderous intentions. Frustrated, Debbie refuses to make love unless he promises never to see his family again. After moving into their new mansion, Fester sends letters to Gomez and Wednesday severing their relationship, which Morticia brushes off as temporary, post-wedding independence. She and Gomez eventually visit the house, however, and realize Debbie’s sexual manipulation of Fester, but police are unwilling to intervene. Meanwhile, Wednesday refuses to play the role of “Pocahontas” in the Grangers' musical about the first Thanksgiving, prompting Gary to again lock her, Pugsley, and Joel inside the Harmony Hut. After being forced to watch upbeat musical films and television programs such as The Sound of Music, Annie, and The Brady Bunch, Wednesday emerges from the room and struggles to smile and profess her desire to become “perky.” One day, Gomez and Morticia are alarmed to discover the previously pasty Pubert suddenly has blonde hair and rosy cheeks. The child’s witch grandmother, “Granny,” determines that the changes were triggered by anxiety over his separation from Fester and his siblings. Unless Fester returns, she and Gomez fear the boy could grow up to become “normal.” On her three-week anniversary, Debbie fills a gift box intended for Fester with explosives and leaves the house. She returns moments before the mansion explodes, but Fester again survives. Thwarted by her husband’s good luck, Debbie pulls a gun on him. Before she can shoot, however, the Addams’s pet disembodied hand, “Thing,” hijacks Debbie’s car and knocks her down. Fester jumps in, and they drive erratically back to the Addams mansion. At Camp Chippewa, Wednesday, Joel, and the other outcast campers sabotage the Thanksgiving musical by burning the sets and throwing their camp mates into the lake. Wednesday kisses Joel through the chain-link fence as she and Pugsley escape. Meanwhile, Gomez falls “ill” and begins to sing show tunes. Just as Fester bursts in to declare his loyalty to the family, the children appear behind him. However, Debbie interrupts the reunion and straps them all to electric chairs. She tells her captives that she murdered her parents and several former husbands for failing to indulge her expensive tastes. Moments before she flips the electrical switch, Pubert connects the broken cables so that the charge is redirected at Debbie, incinerating her. Some time later, the Addams family hosts a party to celebrate Pubert’s first birthday. Fester is enamored by Dementia, the new bald nanny of Cousin Itt’s child, while Joel questions Wednesday about her views on marriage. The two look upon Debbie’s grave, and Wednesday calls the late murderess “sloppy,” declaring that if she were married, she would easily “scare” her own husband to death. As Joel places dead flowers on the ground, a hand reaches through the dirt to grab his wrist. The boy screams, and Wednesday smirks in amusement. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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