Hear No Evil (1993)

R | 97 mins | Drama, Romance | 26 March 1993

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HISTORY

On 30 Dec 1987, Var announced that Orion Pictures had approved development for Mike Wise Productions’ $10 million project, Silencer, described as a “murder-corruption thriller set against the background of a Chicago election.” According to an 18 Jun 1992 DV news item, director Robert Greenwald had an option to produce the script, but the deal expired in Apr 1991 after negotiations for an extension were not approved. Regardless, Greenwald moved forward with production, and the 2 Mar 1992 HR reported that the project, re-titled Danger Sign, had begun development at TriStar Pictures through producer David Matalon and his company, DM Productions. As a result, Silencer screenwriter Danny Rubin sued Robert Greenwald Productions for copyright infringement, and requested an injunction against the film’s release. Rubin was awarded “story by” credit alongside screenwriter R. M. Badat.
       A 6 Mar 1992 Screen International brief referred to the picture as The Quiet One, and reported a co-financing deal with the film’s international distributor, The Summit Group. However, no other contemporary sources mention this title.
       According to the 26 Mar 1992 DV, production was expected to begin 27 Apr 1992 in Portland, OR. However, a 12 May 1992 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 4 May 1992 in the Pacific Northwest. The role of “Jillian Shananhan” was reportedly written with actress Marlee Matlin in mind, and the 26 Mar 1992 DV indicated that Matlin trained as a marathon runner in preparation for the film.
       Reviews were generally negative, with several critics comparing the plot to that of the popular 1967 ... More Less

On 30 Dec 1987, Var announced that Orion Pictures had approved development for Mike Wise Productions’ $10 million project, Silencer, described as a “murder-corruption thriller set against the background of a Chicago election.” According to an 18 Jun 1992 DV news item, director Robert Greenwald had an option to produce the script, but the deal expired in Apr 1991 after negotiations for an extension were not approved. Regardless, Greenwald moved forward with production, and the 2 Mar 1992 HR reported that the project, re-titled Danger Sign, had begun development at TriStar Pictures through producer David Matalon and his company, DM Productions. As a result, Silencer screenwriter Danny Rubin sued Robert Greenwald Productions for copyright infringement, and requested an injunction against the film’s release. Rubin was awarded “story by” credit alongside screenwriter R. M. Badat.
       A 6 Mar 1992 Screen International brief referred to the picture as The Quiet One, and reported a co-financing deal with the film’s international distributor, The Summit Group. However, no other contemporary sources mention this title.
       According to the 26 Mar 1992 DV, production was expected to begin 27 Apr 1992 in Portland, OR. However, a 12 May 1992 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 4 May 1992 in the Pacific Northwest. The role of “Jillian Shananhan” was reportedly written with actress Marlee Matlin in mind, and the 26 Mar 1992 DV indicated that Matlin trained as a marathon runner in preparation for the film.
       Reviews were generally negative, with several critics comparing the plot to that of the popular 1967 thriller, Wait Until Dark (see entry), in which Audrey Hepburn plays a blind woman who becomes an unwitting participant in a grisly drug deal.
       End credits include “Special Thanks to: Heidi Frey; William Claxton Photography; Ferrell Valliere BMW; Quartersaw Gallery; Thomas-Hall Gallery; Itchy Fingers Gallery, Inc.; Hood River Windsurfing – Doug Campbell; Northwave Custom Sails; Northwest Natural Gas; James River Company; Western Paper; Friends of Timberline Lodge; Christie Constructors, Inc.; The Blank Theatre Company; Tab & June Lahodny of A.C. Entertainment; Statewide Protection; Marque Motors; Glad; Telepage Northwest; Promotion Wetsuits; Columbia Sportswear; S.M.R. Network; Hood River Brewing; Starbucks; Uni-Vite Inc.; David Woolson, Manager, Oregon Film and Video Office, Oregon Economic Development Department.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1992
p. 1, 53.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
29 Mar 1993
Section C, p. 16.
Screen International
6 Mar 1992.
---
Variety
30 Dec 1987.
---
Variety
29 Mar 1993
p. 83.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A David Matalon Production
A Robert Greenwald Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit dir of photog
2d unit cam op
Cam loader
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Grip intern
Cam intern
Cam systems by
Lighting equip supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
On set dec
Asst set dec
Set artist
Leadman
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Loc foreman
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
MUSIC
Prod mus supv
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom person
Cable puller
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Addl audio
Addl audio
Asst sd ed
Sd ed by
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec by
Re-rec by
Re-rec by
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Title des
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Makeup asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Matalon
Asst to Mr. Greenwald
Asst to Mr. Greenwald
Asst to Ms. Matlin
Exec asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Interpreter
Auditor
Asst auditor
Los Angeles controller
Los Angeles prod coord
Los Angeles prod coord
Casting assoc
Casting - Portland
Extras casting - Portland
Voice casting
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal handler
Craft service/First aid
Craft service/First aid
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Ms. Matlin's stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Take Me Out To The Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer, courtesy of Broadway Music Corporation
"Don't Cry Shinobu," performed by Dub Squad, written by Alan Alexander III, Dub Squad Music (BMI), courtesy of Tonic Media Records
"The Island," performed by Dub Squad, written by Alan Alexander III, Dub Squad Music (BMI) courtesy of Tonic Media Records
+
SONGS
"Take Me Out To The Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer, courtesy of Broadway Music Corporation
"Don't Cry Shinobu," performed by Dub Squad, written by Alan Alexander III, Dub Squad Music (BMI), courtesy of Tonic Media Records
"The Island," performed by Dub Squad, written by Alan Alexander III, Dub Squad Music (BMI) courtesy of Tonic Media Records
"Free," performed by Dub Squad, written by Alan Alexander III and Jim Daniels, Dub Squad Music (BMI), courtesy of Tonic Media Records
"Bank Of Love," performed by James Armstrong, music and lyrics by James Armstrong, produced by James Armstrong, published by Longitude Music Co. (BMI) and James Armstrong Music Co. (BMI)
"Willow," performed by Joan Armatrading, music and lyrics by Joan Armatrading, ©1977 Rondor Music (London) Ltd., all rights administered in the United States and Canada by Irving Music, Inc. (BMI), courtesy of A & M Records, Inc., all rights reserved - international copyright secured
"On The Wings Of The Night," written by David Defeis, produced by Defeis Music (BMI), performed by Virgin Steel, published 1989 by Defeis Music (BMI)
"Cavalleria Rusticana," performed by The USSR Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra, conducted by Mark Emler, composed by P. Mascagni, courtesy of Melodya Record Company, USSR, distributed by Koch International Corporation
"La Fiamma," performed by The Hungarian State Orchestra, conducted by Lamberto Gardelli, composed by Ottorino Respighi, courtesy of Hungaroton Records, licensed by Qualiton Imports Ltd.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Silencer
The Quiet One
Danger Sign
Release Date:
26 March 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 March 1993
Production Date:
began 4 May 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Great Movie Ventures, Inc. & Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
22 March 1993
Copyright Number:
PA604704
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32331
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Portland, Oregon, a deaf fitness trainer named Jillian Shananhan prepares for the upcoming city marathon. Across town, Jillian’s client, a novice reporter named Mickey O’Malley, borrows the car of his friend, Ben Kendall, to investigate the recent theft of a valuable coin from the J. Prentice Museum. Mickey meets with the robber, a young parolee named Tim “T. W.” Washington, who admits to being hired to carry out the crime by Portland Police Lieutenant Philip Brock. Afraid he is being watched, T. W. gives Mickey the coin and flees. Later, Philip Brock and his associates, Wiley and Cooper, track Mickey to Jillian’s apartment during one of his training sessions. Mickey stealthily hides the coin inside Jillian’s pager moments before Brock barges in to arrest him. Breaking Mickey’s nose and thumb, Brock gives him until midnight to reveal the coin’s location, but the young man returns to Jillian’s apartment to find she is not at home. With time running out, Mickey asks Ben for a loan in hope of appeasing police with cash. Skeptical of his friend’s claim that Brock is corrupt, Ben refuses, but allows him to borrow his car again to meet Brock. The vehicle explodes, killing Mickey. After the funeral, Brock apologizes to Jillian for breaking into her apartment, but requests her presence at the police station for questioning. Although Jillian knows nothing about the coin, Brock remains convinced it is hidden in her apartment. That evening, Ben Kendall telephones to ask if he can stop by Jillian’s apartment to speak with her about the suspicious circumstances surrounding Mickey’s death. In the meantime, she retreats to the bathroom while her friend, Grace, exercises in the next ... +


In Portland, Oregon, a deaf fitness trainer named Jillian Shananhan prepares for the upcoming city marathon. Across town, Jillian’s client, a novice reporter named Mickey O’Malley, borrows the car of his friend, Ben Kendall, to investigate the recent theft of a valuable coin from the J. Prentice Museum. Mickey meets with the robber, a young parolee named Tim “T. W.” Washington, who admits to being hired to carry out the crime by Portland Police Lieutenant Philip Brock. Afraid he is being watched, T. W. gives Mickey the coin and flees. Later, Philip Brock and his associates, Wiley and Cooper, track Mickey to Jillian’s apartment during one of his training sessions. Mickey stealthily hides the coin inside Jillian’s pager moments before Brock barges in to arrest him. Breaking Mickey’s nose and thumb, Brock gives him until midnight to reveal the coin’s location, but the young man returns to Jillian’s apartment to find she is not at home. With time running out, Mickey asks Ben for a loan in hope of appeasing police with cash. Skeptical of his friend’s claim that Brock is corrupt, Ben refuses, but allows him to borrow his car again to meet Brock. The vehicle explodes, killing Mickey. After the funeral, Brock apologizes to Jillian for breaking into her apartment, but requests her presence at the police station for questioning. Although Jillian knows nothing about the coin, Brock remains convinced it is hidden in her apartment. That evening, Ben Kendall telephones to ask if he can stop by Jillian’s apartment to speak with her about the suspicious circumstances surrounding Mickey’s death. In the meantime, she retreats to the bathroom while her friend, Grace, exercises in the next room. A masked intruder breaks in and strangles Grace, but Jillian is unable to hear her screams. When Ben arrives, he suspects something is amiss and climbs through the window in time to save Jillian from the attacker. Once Grace is taken to the hospital, Ben invites Jillian to stay with him for the night. Now convinced that Brock is somehow involved, Ben attempts to schedule a meeting with the police chief. Although the accusations are dismissed for lack of evidence, Jillian sees several officers watching footage of Mickey on their video surveillance tapes. Realizing she is being followed, Jillian decides to extend her stay at Ben’s apartment, and the two become romantically involved. One night after work, Brock corners Jillian and threatens to hurt her if she does not produce the coin. Hoping to find incriminating evidence on the police videotapes, Ben devises a plan to sneak into Brock’s house while he and his wife attend the opera. Although he retrieves the tapes, the Brocks return early and notice a disturbance. Brock alerts his lackey, Cooper, who spots Jillian parked nearby and pursues her through a forest. After a narrow escape, she reunites with Ben and they seek refuge at his mother’s lakeside home. While watching Brock’s video, Jillian lip-reads T. W.’s statement to Mickey linking Brock to the crime. With the help of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Ben arranges to meet with Brock during the city marathon. From a surveillance van, Jillian transcribes footage of Brock admitting his intent to sell the coin for $1 million. Brock is arrested, and Ben suggests he and Jillian celebrate by taking a vacation to a secluded mountain lodge. One afternoon while Ben is at the market, Jillian finds the coin lodged inside her beeper. She pages Ben to inform him of the discovery, but realizes the telephone line has been cut and the proprietress has been murdered. Hoping to distract the killer, Jillian shuts off the electrical circuits and hides in the darkened kitchen. As the attacker approaches, Jillian pulls off his mask. It is Mickey O’Malley. Horrified, Jillian runs upstairs to hide, but the message tone on her beeper alerts Mickey to her location in the equipment storage closet. Jillian plants the beeper in one corner of the room and waits for him to pick it up, knowing he believes the coin is still inside. As he triumphantly lifts the device in the air, Jillian lunges at him with a windsurfing board, causing him to fall through the window to his death. Sometime later, Jillian and Ben attend a tour of the J. Prentice Museum, which has installed a multi-million-dollar security system to protect the newly restored coin. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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