Three of Hearts (1993)

R | 103 mins | Romantic comedy | 30 April 1993

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HISTORY

The 15 Mar 1989 LAHExam announced that Mark Berg would be producing Three of Hearts for Island Pictures, with Robert Downey, Jr. set to star. Actresses interested in the two female leads included Madonna, Elizabeth Perkins, Julia Roberts, Demi Moore, and Elizabeth McGovern. The 4 May 1993 LADN noted that Matt Dillion had also been considered.
       According to the 29 Jun 1989 LAHExam, which provided no details, the project had “fallen apart.” However, the 19 Jun 1990 Screen International reported that Miramax had taken over production, with David Permut and Joel Michaels producing. Filming was set to take place in NYC in early autumn 1990. Elizabeth Perkins was hired, according to the 14 Jul 1990 Screen International, but she was later recast. Production was delayed for over a year, with New Line Cinema now producing the project, as announced in the 30 Aug 1991 Screen International. Billy Baldwin would replace Robert Downey, Jr. in the lead role, as the 21 Apr 1992 DV stated that Downey had left over “creative differences.” Elizabeth Perkins and Bridget Fonda were in negotiations to co-star, and a Nov 1991 start date was anticipated.
       After final casting decisions were made, Kelly Lynch and Sherilyn Fenn were hired as the female leads, and Danny Aiello was listed as a cast member, according to the 31 Jan 1992 Screen International. However, Aiello did not appear in the film.
       Principal photography began on 26 Feb 1992, and was completed on 16 Apr 1992, as reported in the 21 Apr 1992 DV. ... More Less

The 15 Mar 1989 LAHExam announced that Mark Berg would be producing Three of Hearts for Island Pictures, with Robert Downey, Jr. set to star. Actresses interested in the two female leads included Madonna, Elizabeth Perkins, Julia Roberts, Demi Moore, and Elizabeth McGovern. The 4 May 1993 LADN noted that Matt Dillion had also been considered.
       According to the 29 Jun 1989 LAHExam, which provided no details, the project had “fallen apart.” However, the 19 Jun 1990 Screen International reported that Miramax had taken over production, with David Permut and Joel Michaels producing. Filming was set to take place in NYC in early autumn 1990. Elizabeth Perkins was hired, according to the 14 Jul 1990 Screen International, but she was later recast. Production was delayed for over a year, with New Line Cinema now producing the project, as announced in the 30 Aug 1991 Screen International. Billy Baldwin would replace Robert Downey, Jr. in the lead role, as the 21 Apr 1992 DV stated that Downey had left over “creative differences.” Elizabeth Perkins and Bridget Fonda were in negotiations to co-star, and a Nov 1991 start date was anticipated.
       After final casting decisions were made, Kelly Lynch and Sherilyn Fenn were hired as the female leads, and Danny Aiello was listed as a cast member, according to the 31 Jan 1992 Screen International. However, Aiello did not appear in the film.
       Principal photography began on 26 Feb 1992, and was completed on 16 Apr 1992, as reported in the 21 Apr 1992 DV. Production notes in AMPAS library files list filming locations in Los Angeles, CA, and New York City.
       To prepare for his role as a male escort, Billy Baldwin spoke with the New York City Vice Squad, and spent time with real male and female escorts, according to production notes.
       The 15 May 1992 Screen International reported an $11 million budget, half of which was funded by New Line Cinema. A Valentine’s Day 1993 release date was anticipated, and the picture had its world premiere at the 1993 Sundance Film Festival.
       According to the 30 Apr 1993 HR, the picture opened that day in 800 theaters. Executive producer, David Permut, reportedly took six-years to create the film, which began after he met young screenwriter, Adam Greenman. When the script for Three of Hearts proved “too provocative” for major studios, Permut approached independents, two of which agreed to co-finance the picture, as noted in the 3 May 1993 HR. However, unnamed complications arose with the co-producers, and the project was halted. Permut later secured independent financing and partnered with New Line to co-finance the film.
       The 3 May 1993 LAT announced that $35,000 was raised at a benefit screening of the film, held at the Director’s Guild of America Theater, in support of Project Angel Food.
       According to the 4 Aug 1993 HR, the New Line Home Video release was promoted with a “You Pick the Ending” campaign, which allowed voters to choose between two different endings. Filmmakers released different outcomes of the film in the domestic and the international markets, and expected to release the most popular version, based on votes, for the video release.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special Thanks to: Audrey and Sydney Irmas, Tom Hunter, Peter Afterman, John Martin and Black Sparrow Press.” Additionally: “The Producers Wish to Thank: Cynthia Rowley; Dolce & Gabbana; Erwin Pearl; The Essex House; Fluevog Shoes; Gian Marino on the Park; Gruene Cosmetics; Human Kind; Jeune Nuit; Jewely by Reinstein/Ross, N.Y.C.; Kiehls; l.a. Eyeworks; La Crasia Gloves; Legware by Hue; Margo Manhattan Jewelry; Mark Walsh Collecting, NYC; New York University; Nike; Norm Marshall & Associates; Patricia Underwood; Paul Smith Clothing; Ray Bans; Robert Rose; Sebastian International; J. Randolph Schnitman, MD; Three Lives & Company; Time Will Tell, N.Y.; Unique Product Placement; Wybarowa Vodka.”
       Onscreen credits misspell transportation co-captain, William K. Gaskins's name as "William K. Gaskin." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily News
4 May 1993.
---
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1992.
---
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1993
p. 23, 25.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1993
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 1993
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
4 May 1993.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
15 Mar 1989.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
29 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Apr 1993
p. 1.
New York Times
30 Apr 1993
p. 16.
Screen International
19 Jun 1990.
---
Screen International
14 Jul 1990.
---
Screen International
30 Aug 1991.
---
Screen International
31 Jan 1992.
---
Screen International
15 May 1992.
---
Variety
8 Feb 1993
p. 76.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A David Permut production
In association with Joel B. Michaels productions
A film by Yurek Bogayevicz
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr, Los Angeles crew
1st asst dir, Los Angeles crew
2d asst dir, Los Angeles crew
2d 2d asst dir, Los Angeles crew
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
Addl asst dir, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op, Los Angeles crew
1st asst cam, Los Angeles crew
2d asst cam, Los Angeles crew
B cam op, Los Angeles crew
Video cam/2d asst cam, Los Angeles crew
Addl photog, Los Angeles crew
Gaffer, Los Angeles crew
Best boy elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Key grip, Los Angeles crew
Best boy grip, Los Angeles crew
Dolly grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Rigger, Los Angeles crew
Rigger, Los Angeles crew
Still photog, Los Angeles crew
Addl stills, Los Angeles crew
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Steadicam® op, New York crew
Steadicam® op, New York crew
Steadicam® asst, New York crew
Cam trainee, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Elec, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Los Angeles crew
Art dept coord, Los Angeles crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, Los Angeles crew
Leadman, Los Angeles crew
On set dresser, Los Angeles crew
Set dresser, Los Angeles crew
Set dresser, Los Angeles crew
Set dresser, Los Angeles crew
Lead scenic artist, Los Angeles crew
Asst scenic artist, Los Angeles crew
Scenic artist, Los Angeles crew
Prop master, Los Angeles crew
Asst prop master, Los Angeles crew
Const coord, Los Angeles crew
Const foreman, Los Angeles crew
Fabricator, Los Angeles crew
Const team, Los Angeles crew
Const team, Los Angeles crew
Const team, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter, Los Angeles crew
Const asst, Los Angeles crew
Set dec, New York crew
Lead dresser, New York crew
Dresser, New York crew
Prop master, New York crew
Props, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv, Los Angeles crew
Ward costumer, Los Angeles crew
Ward asst, Los Angeles crew
Ward supv, New York crew
Asst ward, New York crew
Ward intern, New York crew
Suits for William Baldwin and Joe Pantoliano provi
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus/Mus wrt, arr, & prod by
Mus supv
Mus rec & mixed by
Mus ed
Asst to mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer, Los Angeles crew
Boom op, Los Angeles crew
Supv sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Dial ed, Los Angeles crew
Dial ed, Los Angeles crew
Dial ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd eff ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst dial ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst dial ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst eff ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst eff ed, Los Angeles crew
Group ADR coord, Los Angeles crew
Foley rec/Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Foley artist, Los Angeles crew
Foley asst, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec at
Sd mixer, New York crew
Boom op, New York crew
Utility sd, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des by
Titles by
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist, Los Angeles crew
Key hairstylist, Los Angeles crew
Asst makeup/hairstylist, Los Angeles crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv, Los Angeles crew
Post prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Loc mgr, Los Angeles crew
Asst loc mgr, Los Angeles crew
Loc scout, Los Angeles crew
Loc security, Los Angeles crew
Prod accountant, Los Angeles crew
Asst prod accountant, Los Angeles crew
Post prod accountant, Los Angeles crew
Asst to the accounting dept, Los Angeles crew
Prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Asst prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Office prod asst, Los Angeles crew
Office prod asst, Los Angeles crew
Office asst, Los Angeles crew
Office intern, Los Angeles crew
Set prod asst, Los Angeles crew
Set prod asst, Los Angeles crew
Set prod asst, Los Angeles crew
Prod assoc, Los Angeles crew
Asst to Mr. Permut, Los Angeles crew
Asst to Mr. Bogayevicz, Los Angeles crew
Casting asst, Los Angeles crew
Extras casting, Los Angeles crew
Pub, Los Angeles crew
International pub
Transportation coord, Los Angeles crew
Transportation capt, Los Angeles crew
Caterer, Los Angeles crew
Chef/Driver, Los Angeles crew
Cook helper, Los Angeles crew
Craft service, Los Angeles crew
Prod cord, New York crew
Asst prod cord, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Asst auditor, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
Craft service, New York crew
Craft service, New York crew
Office prod asst, New York crew
Office prod asst, New York crew
Office intern, New York crew
Set prod asst, New York crew
Set prod asst, New York crew
Set prod asst, New York crew
Addl set asst, New York crew
Addl set asst, New York crew
Addl set asst, New York crew
Addl set asst, New York crew
Transportation capt, New York crew
Transportation co-capt, New York crew
Completion guarantor
Prod insurance by
Payroll services by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Shape of My Heart,” written and performed by Sting, Regatta Music LTD./Blueturtle Music, from the A&M album “Ten Summoners Tales,” courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Dinner For Two,” courtesy of Firstcom/Music House/Chappell
“Ave Maria,” performed by La Chapelle Royale/Collegium Vocale, composed by Anton Bruckner, recording used by permission of Harmonia Mundi France © 1990
+
SONGS
“Shape of My Heart,” written and performed by Sting, Regatta Music LTD./Blueturtle Music, from the A&M album “Ten Summoners Tales,” courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Dinner For Two,” courtesy of Firstcom/Music House/Chappell
“Ave Maria,” performed by La Chapelle Royale/Collegium Vocale, composed by Anton Bruckner, recording used by permission of Harmonia Mundi France © 1990
“Gotta Make Up Your Mind,” written, produced and performed by Liliana Overman, published by Art For Peace Music
“Red Wine Polka,” written, produced and performed by Liliana Overman, published by Art For Peace Music
“Dream Samba,” written, produced and performed by Liliana Overman, published by Art For Peace Music
“Broke And Hungry,” courtesy of Firstcom/Music House/Chappell
“Stop 'Cos You're Breaking My Heart,” courtesy of Firstcom/Music House/Chappell
“Fire,” written by Ralph Middlebrooks, James L. Williams, Marshall Jones, Leroy Bonner, Clarence Satchell, Willie Beck, Marvin R. Pierce, publisher: Play One Music Publishing Co. (BMI), all rights administered by Rightsong Music Inc.
“Bye Bird,” written by Ronnie Aspery, published by Amphonic Music Ltd., courtesy of Audio Action
“Fashion Victim,” courtesy of Firstcom/Music House/Chappell
“Performance Piece,” written by Jan A.P. Kaczmarek
“Wish They Could Have Stayed,” written/produced/performed by Steve Kowalczyk, Pushy Publishing (ASCAP)/Rough House Publishing (ASCAP), courtesy of Transition Music.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 April 1993
Premiere Information:
Sundance Film Festival premiere: January 1993
Los Angeles and New York openings: 30 April 1993
Production Date:
26 February--16 April 1992
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Film House
Duration(in mins):
103
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31888
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, male escort Joe Casella learns from his employer, Mickey, that a man named Harvey has gotten out of jail and is looking for him, convinced that Joe had him arrested. Elsewhere, Ellen breaks up with her girlfriend, Connie, in a public park, which does not stop Connie from causing a scene. Connie begs Ellen not to leave, but her effort is in vain. Sometime later, Ellen moves into her own apartment, and her sister, Allison, broaches the subject of Ellen’s bisexuality. Ellen defends her relationship with Connie, claiming it was not a “phase” and that she loved Connie deeply. At the hospital where she works as a nurse, Connie tells her co-worker, Ralph, that she needs a date for her sister’s upcoming wedding. She had planned to bring Ellen and announce to her conservative Polish parents that she is a lesbian, but now that she is single, she has lost her nerve. Overhearing their conversation, a patient suggests that Connie hire a male escort to pose as her boyfriend. In time, Joe Casella arrives to take Connie to the wedding. He impresses Connie’s family, and she has a great time as his date. Only after they have spent the day together does Connie tell Joe she hired him because Ellen broke up with her. Realizing Joe has her keys in his pocket, Connie follows him and they arrive at his front door to find that his apartment has been vandalized. Connie invites Joe to stay at her place for the night, and shows him her photo album. Seeing pictures of Ellen, Connie ... +


In New York City, male escort Joe Casella learns from his employer, Mickey, that a man named Harvey has gotten out of jail and is looking for him, convinced that Joe had him arrested. Elsewhere, Ellen breaks up with her girlfriend, Connie, in a public park, which does not stop Connie from causing a scene. Connie begs Ellen not to leave, but her effort is in vain. Sometime later, Ellen moves into her own apartment, and her sister, Allison, broaches the subject of Ellen’s bisexuality. Ellen defends her relationship with Connie, claiming it was not a “phase” and that she loved Connie deeply. At the hospital where she works as a nurse, Connie tells her co-worker, Ralph, that she needs a date for her sister’s upcoming wedding. She had planned to bring Ellen and announce to her conservative Polish parents that she is a lesbian, but now that she is single, she has lost her nerve. Overhearing their conversation, a patient suggests that Connie hire a male escort to pose as her boyfriend. In time, Joe Casella arrives to take Connie to the wedding. He impresses Connie’s family, and she has a great time as his date. Only after they have spent the day together does Connie tell Joe she hired him because Ellen broke up with her. Realizing Joe has her keys in his pocket, Connie follows him and they arrive at his front door to find that his apartment has been vandalized. Connie invites Joe to stay at her place for the night, and shows him her photo album. Seeing pictures of Ellen, Connie cries, and Joe comforts her, convincing her that once Ellen gets her heart broken by someone else, she will return to Connie. In desperation, Connie begs Joe to break Ellen’s heart, and instructs him to stage a meeting with Ellen by sitting in on her New York University English course where she is a teaching assistant. Joe is hesitant, but agrees to attend the class. After meeting Ellen, Joe has an instant interest in her, and tells Connie he will have no problem seducing Ellen. Joe’s first English assignment is to write a love letter, which he does with Connie’s help. After reading his letter in class, Ellen accuses Joe of plagiarizing from a Japanese poet. He begs her forgiveness and takes her out for coffee, where he tells her a made-up story about his mother’s death from a drug overdose. Ellen is emotionally moved, but when Joe asks her to go on a date with him, she tells him she is involved with someone named “Conrad.” Later, Joe tells Connie he is wearing Ellen down. In time, ex-convict Harvey telephones Mickey and threatens Joe. Mickey defends Joe, and asks Harvey not to retaliate. Elsewhere, Joe visits Ellen’s apartment unannounced, under the guise of giving her a paper he wrote about his mother. Ellen’s sister, Allison, invites him to stay for dinner, then quickly leaves, hoping that sparks will fly between the couple. After an intimate dinner, Ellen invites Joe to a theater performance in a few day’s time. When Connie sees the flyer for the play in Joe’s pocket, she becomes jealous and tells Joe she wants to call off their plan. However, Joe convinces her to continue. Connie follows Joe to the theater and spies on him and Ellen. Afterward, she waves to Ellen, who tries to avoid her. After an awkward greeting, Ellen confesses to Joe that Connie is her former lover, “Conrad,” and admits that she still loves Connie. Joe embraces her, and continues his seduction at Ellen’s apartment. When she invites Joe to spend the night with her, he declines, leaving Ellen confused and in tears. Joe returns to Connie’s home and finds her watching home videos of Ellen. Joe calls her “pathetic” and insults Connie for showing up at the theater. In time, Mickey and Joe meet with Harvey and again deny that Joe had him arrested, but Harvey is unconvinced. Sometime later, Joe apologizes to Ellen, and she begs him not to waste her time. When she asks for honesty, Joe tearfully reveals that he is afraid of the way she makes him feel. As they embrace, Ellen also cries. Joe continues seeing clients, but feels used and is disgusted by his profession. He insults a wealthy client and races to Ellen’s home to make love to her. Afterward, he professes his love to Ellen. When Joe quits his job as an escort, he angers Mickey, who tells him he is too dumb to do anything else, and retaliates by sending Harvey after him. Later, Joe admits to Connie that he spent the night with Ellen, and she forces him to leave. However, Harvey’s thugs wait for him in the hallway, and force Joe back into Connie’s apartment where they beat him. Connie comforts Joe after the attack, and takes him to the hospital. She notifies Ellen, and when she arrives, Connie confesses that she hired Joe to seduce her. Ellen refuses to believe Connie, but when Joe apologizes, Ellen leaves in disgust. Once he is recovered, Connie takes Joe home from the hospital and asks if he has spoken to Ellen. When he tells her Ellen refuses to speak to him, Connie tells Joe to go and see her, convinced that Ellen is in love with him and will forgive him. Sometime later, Joe approaches Ellen on the street and begs her forgiveness. He tells her that he loves her, and chases after her, screaming her name when she flees in a taxicab. Connie appears on the street, and laughs at Joe’s attempt. She agrees to help him win Ellen back, but teases that she does not want to be invited to their wedding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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