Jurassic Park (1993)

PG-13 | 127 mins | Adventure, Science fiction | 11 June 1993

Director:

Steven Spielberg

Cinematographer:

Dean Cundey

Editor:

Michael Kahn

Production Designer:

Rick Carter

Production Company:

Amblin Entertainment
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HISTORY

In May 1990, Michael Crichton’s manuscript for Jurassic Park was set to be published by Alfred A. Knopf Inc. in Oct 1990. It was sent to several Hollywood studios by Creative Artists Agency (CAA). A 25 May 1990 LAT brief stated that, instead of encouraging a bidding war, CAA urged Crichton to consider equal $1.5 million offers from four studios – each with a director attached – and base his decision on which director and studio were best suited to the project, rather than seeking out the highest bidder. It was rumored that the manuscript could have sold for as much as $2 million. The four major offers came from Universal Pictures, with Steven Spielberg attached to direct, and Amblin Entertainment to produce; Columbia/TriStar, with Dick Donner attached to direct, and Guber-Peters Entertainment Company to produce; Warner Bros. with Tim Burton attached to direct, and Joel Silver to produce; and Twentieth Century Fox, with Joe Dante attached to direct, and Sandollar Productions to produce. Negotiations began 21 May 1990, as noted in the 24 May 1990 HR. Universal and Spielberg ultimately won film rights, and in addition to the $1.5 million purchase price, paid Michael Crichton $500,000 to write the script.
       Although a 2 Mar 1992 New York brief stated that Malia Scotch Marmo was brought in to rewrite Crichton’s original script, Marmo does not receive onscreen credit, which was shared by Crichton and screenwriter David Koepp.
       According to a 12 May 1992 DV brief, actor William Hurt passed on the project. Others under consideration, but not cast, included Tim Robbins and Richard Dreyfuss. Although John ... More Less

In May 1990, Michael Crichton’s manuscript for Jurassic Park was set to be published by Alfred A. Knopf Inc. in Oct 1990. It was sent to several Hollywood studios by Creative Artists Agency (CAA). A 25 May 1990 LAT brief stated that, instead of encouraging a bidding war, CAA urged Crichton to consider equal $1.5 million offers from four studios – each with a director attached – and base his decision on which director and studio were best suited to the project, rather than seeking out the highest bidder. It was rumored that the manuscript could have sold for as much as $2 million. The four major offers came from Universal Pictures, with Steven Spielberg attached to direct, and Amblin Entertainment to produce; Columbia/TriStar, with Dick Donner attached to direct, and Guber-Peters Entertainment Company to produce; Warner Bros. with Tim Burton attached to direct, and Joel Silver to produce; and Twentieth Century Fox, with Joe Dante attached to direct, and Sandollar Productions to produce. Negotiations began 21 May 1990, as noted in the 24 May 1990 HR. Universal and Spielberg ultimately won film rights, and in addition to the $1.5 million purchase price, paid Michael Crichton $500,000 to write the script.
       Although a 2 Mar 1992 New York brief stated that Malia Scotch Marmo was brought in to rewrite Crichton’s original script, Marmo does not receive onscreen credit, which was shared by Crichton and screenwriter David Koepp.
       According to a 12 May 1992 DV brief, actor William Hurt passed on the project. Others under consideration, but not cast, included Tim Robbins and Richard Dreyfuss. Although John Forsythe was listed as a cast member in a 5 Jun 1992 Screen International brief, he did not appear in the final film. After a fifteen-year hiatus from acting, director Richard Attenborough was cast in the role of “John Hammond,” as reported in the 19 Aug 1992 HR.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that two years of planning preceded the four-month shoot. Pre-production was underway by 30 Aug 1991, according to an LAT brief of the same date, with an expected Sep 1992 start date. Filming began slightly earlier, on 24 Aug 1992 in Kauai, HI, where “Jurassic Park” exteriors were filmed in resort-land near Lihue, as noted in the 24 Aug 1992 LAT and 8 Sep 1992 HR production chart. According to the 15 Sep 1992 LAT, location filming in Kauai was cut short by Hurricane Iniki during the week of 7 Sep 1992. Cast and crew resumed filming on Stage 24 at Universal Studios, where the industrial-size kitchen of the Jurassic Park visitors’ center was built. Next, cast and crew travelled to Red Rock Canyon State Park in Southern CA, which doubled as the Montana Badlands. Returning to Universal Studios in mid-Sep 1992, filmmakers shot tropical jungle scenes, including the tour group attack, a Brachiosaurus tree-eating scene, the velociraptor attack on “Robert Muldoon,” and the mauling of “Dennis Nedry,” on Stage 27, where Spielberg previously filmed portions of Jaws (1975, see entry). Stage 28 was the site of the computer control room, with computer equipment on loan from SuperMac, Silicon Graphics, and Thinking Machines. The dinosaur hatchery was also shot on Stage 28. Stage 12 housed the Tyrannosaurus paddock and visitors’ center rotunda, in which two “museum-quality” recreations of Tyrannosaurus and Alamosaurus skeletons, built by Research Casting International, were hung from the ceiling. Filming also took place at Warner Bros. Studios Stage 16.
       Live-action robotic dinosaurs created by Stan Winston took over eighteen months to complete, as stated in the 24 Jan 1993 LAT. The twenty-foot Tyrannosaurus consisted of a fiberglass frame and 3,000 pounds of clay, covered in a fragile latex skin painted by a team of artists, and mounted on a “dino-simulator” that allowed twelve different operators to actuate the dinosaur’s movements through a computer control board. A fifth-scale version of the twenty-foot Tyrannosaurus was built, and used to rehearse moves and actions that were later carried out by its larger counterpart. In addition to live-action dinosaurs, Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) computer graphics designers created a walk cycle for the Tyrannosaurus, and generated wide shots, including a stampede, and a herd of dinosaurs shown against an expansive jungle backdrop.
       According to a 31 Mar 2013 LAT article, paleontologist consultant Jack Horner, upon whom the character of “Dr. Alan Grant” is partly based, not only worked with actors Sam Neill and Laura Dern, but advised Spielberg on the robotic dinosaurs. Although Horner insisted that dinosaurs were brightly colored, Spielberg did not believe colorful dinosaurs would look as scary as gray, brown, and black reptiles. Horner also warned that dinosaurs most likely did not roar, as depicted in the film, but made bird-like noises, and the Tyrannosaurus was mainly a scavenger who could not run fast. Ultimately, Horner acknowledged that Spielberg had to take artistic liberties to heighten suspense.
       Spielberg maintained a secrecy around the film much like he had with E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982, see entry), when no photographs of the alien were released prior to that film’s premiere, according to a Mar 1993 Us magazine item. Security badges were required to enter the set, actors were restricted from sharing certain information in interviews, and merchandising partners were made to sign nondisclosure agreements. Although the set was generally closed to visitors, Spielberg granted Don Lessem, editor of the Dinosaur Society’s Dino Times magazine, a set visit and interview to be published in a Jurassic Park themed issue, according to the 24 Jan 1993 LAT. At the suggestion of the Dinosaur Society, Spielberg also donated $25,000 to the Institute of Vertebrae Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing, China. As a thank-you, the institute named a 170-million-year-old dinosaur recently unearthed in China after nine cast members, using the first letters of their surnames: “Jurassosaurus nedegoapeferkimorum.”
       A 1 Dec 1992 DV “Just for Variety” column listed 30 Nov 1992 as the final day of principal photography. The film wrapped twelve days early and, according to a 9 Dec 1992 Newsday item, several million dollars under budget, at an amount less than $55 million.
       The final production budget was listed in a 10 Feb 1993 WSJ article as $60 million, over “twice the industry average,” with $20 million already spent on prints and advertising, making Jurassic Park one of the costliest films of the year. Universal Pictures’ parent company, MCA, acquired by Matsushita Electrical Industrial Co. in 1990, was reportedly in the midst of a two-year “cold streak” at the box-office, and was looking to Jurassic Park to bolster its profits.
       In Feb 1993, with post-production underway in the U.S., Spielberg began filming Schindler’s List (1993, see entry) in Poland. According to a 29 Mar 1993 DV item, ILM developed cutting-edge software to deliver visual effects to Poland via satellite. The software sent a video signal “over high-speed phone lines, then satellited [the signal] to Spielberg’s office overseas,” allowing the director to view dailies and computer-animated dinosaurs composited with actors, and to communicate with computer artists visible at the bottom of his computer screen.
       More than a year before the film’s release, the first three product licensing deals were struck with Kenner Products, Ocean of America, and Sega of America, as noted in an 8 Jun 1992 Var brief. On 8 Feb 1993, HR reported that Amblin Entertainment and Universal had signed merchandising deals with 100 companies, for products ranging from action figures to video games to children’s shoes. Western Publishing had plans for fourteen different books and craft sets; MCA’s Putnam book division had storybooks, young adult novels, and pop-up books in the works; and a McDonalds’s fast food chain promotion featured a “dino-sized meal,” as stated in the 26 May 1993 HR. MCA/Universal Merchandising creative director John Hornick claimed expectations for Jurassic Park products were high, partly because the film used its title and logo as a plot point – in one scene, characters encounter a gift shop teeming with “Jurassic Park” merchandise – something no movie had done before, according to Hornick.
       A 2 Mar 1993 LADN brief stated that Ballantine Books was readying its largest printing ever – two million copies of Michael Crichton’s novel, Jurassic Park, to coincide with the film’s release. The latest printing brought total copies up to five million.
       On 9 Jun 1993, a benefit premiere was held in Washington, D.C., with proceeds going toward the Los Angeles, CA-based Children’s Action Network and the Washington, D.C.-based Children’s Defense Fund, as noted in the 16 May 1993 LAT. Theatrical release began two days later on 11 Jun 1993, with 1,500 midnight screenings, according to the 26 May 1993 HR. The following day, the release expanded to over 3,000 screens. Illegal filming inside theaters resulted in the seizure of roughly 1,000 “bootlegged” home video copies from street vendors in New York City and Philadelphia, PA, as noted in a 13 Aug 1993 DV item. Universal addressed the problem by issuing cash rewards to theater employees who reported incidents of piracy.
       Jurassic Park became an unprecedented commercial success. By early Oct 1993, the film surpassed the previous global box-office record holder, Spielberg’s own E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial, grossing $704 million worldwide, as reported in the 5 Oct 1993 WSJ. The 4 Oct 1993 Var stated that Spielberg stood to earn over $200 million, a record-breaking figure that would top Jack Nicholson’s estimated $60 million payday from Batman (1989, see entry). By early Oct 1993, ticket sales and promotional tie-ins surpassed $1 billion, making Jurassic Park one of eight films – half of which were directed by Spielberg – to accomplish such a feat. Nearly four years after its release, the 30 May 1997 LAT stated Jurassic Park was still “the world’s top-grossing movie of all time,” having generated roughly $3 billion from all revenue sources, including $700 million in “pure” net profits. Earnings were broken down as follows: $916 million worldwide box-office sales ($357 million domestic; $559 million foreign); $1 billion in merchandise retail sales; $500 million in home video sales; and $150 million in television sales.
       The film was ranked #35 on AFI’s 2001 100 Years…100 Thrills list of the most thrilling American films of all time. It won Academy Awards for Best Sound, Sound Effects Editing, and Visual Effects. Other accolades included an award from the Film Information Council for Best Marketed Motion Picture of 1993, and the first-ever Star Power Award from the Promotion Marketing Association of America Inc., according to an item in the 28 Sep 1993 HR.
       According to an 18 Sep 1994 LAT article, the 4 Oct 1994 home video release was promoted with a $65-million advertising campaign, including promotional tie-ins with Jell-O (seen wobbling in the film during a dinosaur attack), Kenner Toys, Tiger Electronics, and McDonald’s. The 7 Apr 1995 HR announced MCA/Universal Home Video’s plans to release a fifty-minute behind-the-scenes documentary, narrated by actor James Earl Jones, on home video on 9 May 1995. A LaserDisc version of the documentary was set to include thirty extra minutes of footage including pre-production meetings and location scouting videos filmed by Spielberg. A reissue of the Jurassic Park VHS, along with the release of a DVD of both Jurassic Park and its sequel, The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997, see entry), took place on 10 Oct 2000, as stated in a 14 Jun 2000 HR brief; the releases were backed by a $250-million promotional campaign that began on 2 Oct 2000. Jurassic Park DVD extras included a location scouting segment from Kauai, and production notes.
       A 16 Sep 1993 LAT brief credited the film with a rising interest in dinosaur fossils. At a recent auction in London, England, a “pile of fossilized dinosaur droppings” sold for $4,625, ten times more than the expected hammer price.
       A museum exhibit featuring film clips and props from Jurassic Park debuted in New York City, around the time of the release, as noted in a 27 Jun 1997 LAT item. The exhibit traveled around the U.S. for several years and, as of Jun 1997, was being featured at San Diego, CA’s Natural History Museum, where it boosted summer attendance by three times. At Universal Studios theme park in Los Angeles, “Jurassic Park – The Ride” debuted in summer 1996, as noted in the 10 Nov 1995 WSJ.
       The film’s German distributor, UIP, sued pornographic video company VTO to stop the release of a Jurassic Park sex parody titled Jurassic Fuck, as reported in a 1 Oct 1993 HR item. The poster for the pornographic film was said to be “a near replica” of UIP’s poster for Jurassic Park. Legal proceedings led to VTO’s agreement to drop the word “Jurassic” from the title of the “erotic, special effects comedy,” set to be released in Dec 1993. Universal set up a hotline to report illegal use of the word “Jurassic,” as in the case of an Erie, PA, zoo that named an exhibit “Jurassic Jungle.” Universal threatened to sue the zoo, which relented and renamed its attraction “Dinosaur Jungle,” despite its conviction that “Jurassic” should be considered a descriptive term unrelated to any commercial venture. In another lawsuit, the 14 Jun 1996 LAT reported that songwriter Donald I. Altman accused MCA, Inc. of copyright infringement, claiming that composer John Williams stole his “Jacob’s Song (Live Forever),” for Jurassic Park’s theme music. The outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined.
       The film was converted to 3-D at a cost of roughly $10 million. The 3-D version was released in Apr 2013, according to an 8 Apr 2013 LAT article. Sequels included The Lost World: Jurassic Park, directed by Spielberg and released 23 May 1997; Jurassic Park III, directed by Joe Johnston (2001, see entry); and Jurassic World, directed by Colin Trevorrow (2015, see entry).
       End credits include the following statements: “Filmed at Universal Studios and Kauai, Hawaii”; and, “The producers wish to thank the following: George Lucas; The island & people of Kauai; Mayor Joann Yukimora; Kauai Film Commissioner Judy Drosd; State of Hawaii Film Office; California Film Commission; Iris Indigo Elans and 4D/440 VGXT Computer Systems provided by Silicon Graphics; Apple Computer, Inc.; Supermac Technology; 3D Weather Software by Earthwatch Communications Minneapolis; 4D Creative Environment provided by Softimage; Electric Image; Newer Technology; Kaimbu Island Resort, Fiji; Turtle Island, Fiji; Tropicals by Gordon Courtright © 1988 by Timber Press; Rixan & Associates, Inc.; Genetic Engineering News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers; Carl Zeiss, Inc.; Helicopter Tour Operators of Kauai; The Dinosaur Society – Don Lessem; Connection Machine (CM-5) supercomputer system by Thinking Machines Corporation.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 May 1990
p. 1, 7.
Daily Variety
12 May 1992.
---
Daily Variety
1 Dec 1992.
---
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1993.
---
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1990
p. 1, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1993
p. 1, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1995.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 2000
p. 1, 35.
Los Angeles Daily News
2 Mar 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 May 1990
Section D, p. 1, 5.
Los Angeles Times
30 Aug 1991
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
24 Aug 1992
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
15 Sep 1992
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
24 Jan 1993
Calendar, p. 28.
Los Angeles Times
16 May 1993
Section E, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
16 Sep 1993
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
4 Feb 1994
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
18 Sep 1994
Calendar, p. 87.
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1996
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
30 May 1997
Section D, pp. 1-2.
Los Angeles Times
27 Jun 1997
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
31 Mar 2013
Calendar, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
8 Apr 2013
Calendar, p. 3.
New York
2 Mar 1992.
---
New York Times
11 Jun 1993
p. 1.
Newsday
9 Dec 1992
p. 11.
Premiere
Feb 1994.
---
Screen International
5 Jun 1992.
---
Us
Mar 1993.
---
Variety
8 Jun 1992.
---
Variety
14 Jun 1993
p. 54.
Variety
4 Oct 1993
pp. 11-12, 78.
WSJ
10 Feb 1993
Section A, p. 1.
WSJ
27 Aug 1993
Section B, p. 1.
WSJ
5 Oct 1993.
---
WSJ
10 Nov 1995
Section B, p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Steven Spielberg Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Aerial unit dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Asst cam, Aerial unit
Loader
Video eng
Addl video assist
Chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
2d unit gaffer
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Key rigging grip
Grip
Grip, Hawaii unit
Elec, Hawaii unit
Still photog
Remote control cam systems by
Crane and dollies by
Gyrosphere by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Chief sculptor
Computer des
Illustrator
Illustrator
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Set des
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Swing gang
Const coord
Head paint foreman
Stand-by painter
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Head laborer
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Head greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Tool foreman
Greens foreman
Set dressing coord
COSTUMES
Women's cost supv
Men's cost supv
Textile artist
MUSIC
Mus contractor
Mus preparation
Mus scoring mixer
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Post prod sd services provided by
A Division of Lucas Digital Ltd., Marin County, California
Re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Sd des, Skywalker Sound
Sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Supv sd ed, Skywalker Sound
ADR ed, Skywalker Sound
Dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Foley ed, Skywalker Sound
Foley ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst supv sd ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst sd des, Skywalker Sound
Asst sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst ADR ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst foley ed, Skywalker Sound
Apprentice ed, Skywalker Sound
Foley artist, Skywalker Sound
Foley artist, Skywalker Sound
Foley rec, Skywalker Sound
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR voice casting
Dolby stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Full-motion dinosaurs by
Live action dinosaurs
Dinosaur supv
Spec dinosaur eff
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff shop supv
Spec eff eng
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff rigging foreman
Full motion dinosaurs and spec visual eff by
A Division of Lucas Digital Ltd.
Co-visual eff supv, ILM
Visual eff prod, ILM
Lead computer graphics supv, ILM
Computer graphics supv, ILM
Computer graphics supv, ILM
ILM gen mgr
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics anim, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Computer graphics artist, ILM
Exec in charge of prod, ILM
Supv of software and digital technology, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Computer graphics software developer, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Visual eff art dir, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Scanning supv, ILM
Opt supv, ILM
Plate photog cam asst, ILM
ILM plate prod
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Digital artist, ILM
Computer graphics cam matchmoves, ILM
Computer graphics cam matchmoves, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Computer graphics tech asst, ILM
Scanning op, ILM
Scanning op, ILM
Scanning op, ILM
Computer graphics systems support, ILM
Computer graphics systems support, ILM
Computer graphics systems support, ILM
Video eng, ILM
Video eng, ILM
Computer graphics coord, ILM
Computer graphics coord, ILM
CG dept prod mgr, ILM
CG dept operations mgr, ILM
Sr CG dept mgr, ILM
Visual eff cam op, ILM
Visual eff cam op, ILM
Addl plate photog, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Asst ed, ILM
Negative cutter, ILM
Ed coord, ILM
Projectionist, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt line up, ILM
Opt line up, ILM
Opt lab tech, ILM
Opt/Scanning coord, ILM
Cam eng, ILM
Cam eng, ILM
Prod accountant, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Courier coord, ILM
Art dept coord, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept coord, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical dept coord, Stan Winston Studio
Mech dept coord, Stan Winston Studio
Concept artist, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical des, Stan Winston Studio
Tech coord T-RexMechanical des, Stan Winston Studi
Hydraulic eng, Stan Winston Studio
Master welder, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Key artist, Stan Winston Studio
Master mold maker, Stan Winston Studio
Dinosaur skin fabricator, Stan Winston Studio
Dinosaur skin fabricator, Stan Winston Studio
Dinosaur skin fabricator, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Art dept, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical dept, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical dept, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical dept, Stan Winston Studio
Mechanical dept, Stan Winston Studio
Prod coord, Stan Winston Studio
Prod coord, Stan Winston Studio
Prod asst, Stan Winston Studio
Prod asst, Stan Winston Studio
Prod supv, Tippett Studio
Computer interface eng, Tippett Studio
Sr anim, Tippett Studio
Anim, Tippett Studio
Computer systems, Tippett Studio
Prod coord, Tippett Studio
Prod, Tippett Studio
Prod, Tippett Studio
Engineering, Tippett Studio
Engineering, Tippett Studio
Engineering, Tippett Studio
Engineering, Tippett Studio
Engineering, Tippett Studio
Animatics, Tippett Studio
Animatics, Tippett Studio
Animatics, Tippett Studio
Animatics, Tippett Studio
Computer tech, Tippett Studio
Computer tech, Tippett Studio
Titles and opticals by
Process compositing by
MAKEUP
Make-up supv
Asst make-up supv
Body make-up
Hair supv
Asst hair supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Extras casting
Extras casting, Hawaii unit
Casting asst
Casting assoc
Paleontologist consultant
DGA trainee
Unit pub
Prod office coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord, Hawaii unit
Prod secy
Office asst, Hawaii unit
First aid/Safety coord
Safety coord, Aerial unit
Loc mgr
Loc mgr, Hawaii unit
Asst loc mgr, Hawaii unit
Craft service
Display graphics supv
Display graphics
24 frame computer sync
24 frame computer sync
Dinosaur specialist
Dinosaur specialist
Dinosaur specialist
Dinosaur specialist
Slide show coord
Goat and body parts
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Const accountant
Payroll accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
2d asst to Mr. Spielberg
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Mr. Molen
Asst to Ms. Ryan
Asst to Sam Neill
Asst to David Koepp
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt, Hawaii unit
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal trainer
Teacher
Safety coord
Security, Hawaii unit
Aerial coord
Picture pilot, Aerial unit
Post prod asst
Amblin projectionist
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Anim by, "Mr. D. N. A." animation
Movement des, "Mr. D. N. A." animation
Layout des, "Mr. D. N. A." animation
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton (New York, 1990).
SONGS
"Que Milagro Chapparita," written by Dolores Ayala Olivares, performed by The Madacy Mariachi Band, courtesy of Madacy Music Group.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
11 June 1993
Premiere Information:
Washington, D.C. premiere: 9 June 1993
Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 June 1993
Production Date:
24 August--30 November 1992
Copyright Claimants:
Universal City Studios, Inc. Amblin Entertainment, Inc.
Copyright Dates:
10 June 1993 10 June 1993
Copyright Numbers:
PA620023 PA620023
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby® Stereo Digital; DTS in selected theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
127
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32451
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Montana’s Badlands, paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant and Dr. Ellie Sattler, his paleobotanist partner, examine velociraptor fossils. They are interrupted by John Hammond, arriving by helicopter. Grant is annoyed by the imposition until he realizes Hammond is one of the donors supporting his project. Hammond promises to fund the dig for another three years in exchange for a favor: he needs them to endorse his latest endeavor, a “biological preserve” on Isla Nublar, an island just west of Costa Rica. Grant and Ellie agree to fly down for the weekend. On the way, they meet Hammond’s other guests: Dr. Ian Malcolm, a mathematician who specializes in chaos theory, and Donald Gennaro, a lawyer who represents Hammond’s investors, and has organized the weekend investigation of Isla Nublar to ensure the viability of the project. Arriving in Isla Nublar, the group is driven to Hammond’s “Jurassic Park” in jeeps. Grant, Ellie, and Ian Malcolm are stunned to see live brachiosauruses roaming the grounds. Grant falls to his knees when he hears that Hammond also has a Tyrannosaurus rex. The scientists wonder how Hammond accomplished such a feat. Hammond leads them to the visitors’ center, where they view an informational film, explaining the scientific technology behind the park: strands of dinosaur DNA have been extracted from Jurassic-era mosquitos fossilized in amber and combined with frog DNA to form complete DNA sequences, allowing geneticists to successfully clone several types of dinosaurs. In a laboratory, the group witnesses the hatching of a velociraptor egg. A scientist named Wu explains that all the dinosaurs are female, to prevent the animals from breeding. Doubtful of this strategy, Ian Malcolm suggests that adaptations might occur to support ... +


In Montana’s Badlands, paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant and Dr. Ellie Sattler, his paleobotanist partner, examine velociraptor fossils. They are interrupted by John Hammond, arriving by helicopter. Grant is annoyed by the imposition until he realizes Hammond is one of the donors supporting his project. Hammond promises to fund the dig for another three years in exchange for a favor: he needs them to endorse his latest endeavor, a “biological preserve” on Isla Nublar, an island just west of Costa Rica. Grant and Ellie agree to fly down for the weekend. On the way, they meet Hammond’s other guests: Dr. Ian Malcolm, a mathematician who specializes in chaos theory, and Donald Gennaro, a lawyer who represents Hammond’s investors, and has organized the weekend investigation of Isla Nublar to ensure the viability of the project. Arriving in Isla Nublar, the group is driven to Hammond’s “Jurassic Park” in jeeps. Grant, Ellie, and Ian Malcolm are stunned to see live brachiosauruses roaming the grounds. Grant falls to his knees when he hears that Hammond also has a Tyrannosaurus rex. The scientists wonder how Hammond accomplished such a feat. Hammond leads them to the visitors’ center, where they view an informational film, explaining the scientific technology behind the park: strands of dinosaur DNA have been extracted from Jurassic-era mosquitos fossilized in amber and combined with frog DNA to form complete DNA sequences, allowing geneticists to successfully clone several types of dinosaurs. In a laboratory, the group witnesses the hatching of a velociraptor egg. A scientist named Wu explains that all the dinosaurs are female, to prevent the animals from breeding. Doubtful of this strategy, Ian Malcolm suggests that adaptations might occur to support procreation because “life cannot be contained.” Hammond leads the group to a highly secure building where the velociraptors are kept. Game warden Robert Muldoon jokes that they should all be destroyed, noting they are extremely intelligent, good at jumping, and lethal by the age of eight months. Malcolm believes that Hammond lacks respect for the genetic power he is wielding, Ellie worries that an ecosystem necessary to support dinosaur life cannot be recreated, and Grant fears the mix of humans and dinosaurs is highly unpredictable. Hammond remains optimistic that his guests will change their minds. After lunch, Hammond’s grandchildren, Lex and Tim, arrive, and he sends them on a tour of the park with Grant, Ellie, Malcolm, and Donald Gennaro. The guests are split into two driverless SUVs guided by a metal track. The SUVs move along a path bordered by electric fences. Hammond monitors the tour from a control room in the visitors’ center, where Robert Muldoon warns him that a tropical storm is headed for the island. Hammond is upset when his guests fail to spot any dinosaurs. Finally, Grant sees a triceratops in the distance. He breaks the rules by getting out of the car and is followed by Ellie, Gennaro, Tim, and Lex. They meet Harding, a veterinarian tending to the sick triceratops. Ellie examines the dinosaur’s droppings, hoping to determine what plant life might have made it sick, and decides to stay with Harding while the others rejoin the tour. Back in the control room, disgruntled computer technician Dennis Nedry informs fellow technician, Ray Arnold, and Hammond that the computer system will be “compiling” for the next twenty minutes, and some systems may turn on and off during that time. After secretly shutting down some of the park’s security and electrical systems, Nedry sneaks into cold storage and steals several dinosaur embryos, which he plans to sell to a rival company for $1.5 million. Nedry hides the embryos in a hollowed-out can of shaving cream, and sets out in the rain to deliver them to an awaiting boat. Meanwhile, the electric fences surrounding the perimeter of Jurassic Park are deactivated, and the tour group’s driverless cars come to a halt. Ray Arnold tries to reboot the system, but Nedry has set a secret password, and is nowhere to be found. The Tyrannosaurus breaks through the deactivated fencing and approaches the tour group’s SUVs. Lex inadvertently draws its attention with a flashlight, and the dinosaur overturns the car, trapping Lex and Tim underneath. The Tyrannosaurus eats Donald Gennaro when he tries to flee, and wounds Ian Malcolm. Grant rescues Lex and Tim from the upturned car, narrowly avoiding attack. Hammond sends Robert Muldoon to rescue his grandchildren, and Ellie volunteers to go along. However, they are only able to rescue Malcolm before the Tyrannosaurus chases them out of the park. Elsewhere, Nedry crashes his jeep on the way to the dock and is blinded by a poison-spitting Dilophosaurus. Just before he is mauled to death, he drops the stolen dinosaur embryos on the ground. Grant and the children spend the night in a tree. They are awakened at dawn by a brachiosaurus, munching on the tree branches. On the hike back to the visitors’ center, Grant finds a dinosaur egg and determines that Malcolm was right – the dinosaurs have found a way to procreate. He explains to Tim and Lex that certain breeds of West African frogs are able to change sex in order to breed, and because the dinosaur clones were created using frog DNA, they must have inherited this adaptation. In the control room, Ray Arnold attempts to restore order by shutting all systems down, but circuit breakers are tripped in the process. Hammond, Ellie, Malcolm, and Muldoon take cover in an emergency bunker as Arnold goes to turn on the circuit breakers in a maintenance shed. When Arnold doesn’t return, Ellie and Muldoon set out to complete the job. Wielding a tranquilizer gun, Muldoon tracks a velociraptor outside the maintenance shed as Ellie goes inside. At the same time, Grant, Lex, and Tim scale the deactivated electrical fence. Ellie turns on the circuit breakers and restores power, which causes Tim to be electrocuted; however, Grant revives the boy with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). As Ellie is chased out of the shed by a velociraptor, she sees Ray Arnold’s mangled body. Although she narrowly escapes, Muldoon is killed. Grant and the children make it back to the visitors’ center. He leaves them in the restaurant to go in search of the others, and two velociraptors chase them into the kitchen. Tim and Lex outsmart the velociraptors, and join up with Ellie and Grant as they take refuge in the control room. Lex uses her computer hacking skills to lock the door and restore the phone system. Grant calls Hammond in the emergency bunker and instructs him to call for a rescue helicopter. The velociraptors break through the glass of the control room and chase Grant, Ellie, and the kids into the lobby. Just when the dinosaurs have them cornered, the Tyrannosaurus appears and attacks the velociraptors, allowing the group to flee to an awaiting jeep. A frazzled Grant announces his decision not to endorse the park, and Hammond concurs. They board a helicopter leaving the island, and Hammond is filled with disappointment as he takes a last look at his failed venture. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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