Our Time (1974)

PG | 88, 90-91 or 96 mins | Drama | 10 April 1974

Director:

Peter Hyams

Writer:

Jane C. Stanton

Producer:

Richard A. Roth

Cinematographer:

Jules Brenner

Editor:

James Mitchell

Production Designer:

Peter Wooley
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HISTORY

Working titles for the film included The Girls of Penfield and Basic Training, as stated in DV news items from 17 Sep 1973 and 2 Nov 1973. After its theatrical release, Our Time aired on television under the title, Death of Her Innocence, according to a 12 Mar 1978 LAT listing.
       A 17 Sep 1973 DV news item stated that roughly 1,000 young actors and actresses auditioned for the film after a “news and trade-paper ad campaign” was used to recruit hopefuls.
       According to an HR production chart listing on 28 Sep 1973, filming began in Boston, MA, on 24 Sep 1973. In addition to Boston, the film was shot in Concord, MA, and Los Angeles, CA, as stated in production notes found at AMPAS library. An 8 Dec 1973 LAHExam article noted that classroom scenes were filmed on Warner Bros. studio sound stages.
       The film received mixed reviews. Several critics, including Alan R. Howard in a 4 Apr 1974 HR review and Vincent Canby in an 11 Apr 1974 NYT review, pointed to Jane C. Stanton’s screenplay and Peter Hyams’s direction as primary weaknesses. A 3 Apr 1974 Var described the film’s “dramatic range” as “nil, aggravated further by the…senseless, zonked-out, unmotivated camera creep movements which scarred the director’s earlier film,” referring to Hyams’s directorial debut, Busting (1974, see entry). In a positive review on 26 Apr 1974, LAT’s Kevin Thomas praised the young cast and the filmmakers’ “meticulous” depiction of the 1950s.
       Our Time marked ... More Less

Working titles for the film included The Girls of Penfield and Basic Training, as stated in DV news items from 17 Sep 1973 and 2 Nov 1973. After its theatrical release, Our Time aired on television under the title, Death of Her Innocence, according to a 12 Mar 1978 LAT listing.
       A 17 Sep 1973 DV news item stated that roughly 1,000 young actors and actresses auditioned for the film after a “news and trade-paper ad campaign” was used to recruit hopefuls.
       According to an HR production chart listing on 28 Sep 1973, filming began in Boston, MA, on 24 Sep 1973. In addition to Boston, the film was shot in Concord, MA, and Los Angeles, CA, as stated in production notes found at AMPAS library. An 8 Dec 1973 LAHExam article noted that classroom scenes were filmed on Warner Bros. studio sound stages.
       The film received mixed reviews. Several critics, including Alan R. Howard in a 4 Apr 1974 HR review and Vincent Canby in an 11 Apr 1974 NYT review, pointed to Jane C. Stanton’s screenplay and Peter Hyams’s direction as primary weaknesses. A 3 Apr 1974 Var described the film’s “dramatic range” as “nil, aggravated further by the…senseless, zonked-out, unmotivated camera creep movements which scarred the director’s earlier film,” referring to Hyams’s directorial debut, Busting (1974, see entry). In a positive review on 26 Apr 1974, LAT’s Kevin Thomas praised the young cast and the filmmakers’ “meticulous” depiction of the 1950s.
       Our Time marked playwright Jane C. Stanton’s motion picture writing debut, and was based on her life, as stated in 8 Dec 1973. According to Mar and Jul 1974 issues of Warner Bros. Rambling Reporter, it was the first to be named as “one of the best films of 1974-75 by the U.S.A. Film Festival,” and was also deemed “Picture of the Month by Seventeen magazine for Jul 1974. A 15 Jul 1974 Box item announced that actors Betsy Slade and George O’Hanlon, Jr. were given “Star of Tomorrow” awards at the “Rocky Mountain Motion Picture Association Convention.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Apr 1974
p. 4677.
Box Office
15 Jul 1974.
---
Daily Variety
17 Sep 1973.
---
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1973
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1973
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 1974
p. 4, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 1974.
---
LAHExam
8 Dec 1973.
---
LAHExam
26 Apr 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Apr 1974
Section IV, p. 1, 27.
Los Angeles Times
12 Mar 1978.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Apr 1974
p. 89.
New York Times
11 Apr 1974
p. 31.
Time
29 Apr 1974
p. 77.
Variety
3 Apr 1974
p. 24.
Warner Bros. Rambling Reporter
Mar 1974.
---
Warner Bros. Rambling Reporter
Jul 1974.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Richard A. Roth Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Key grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Photog equip by
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec
Const coord
COSTUMES
Penfield uniforms des by
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus rec
SOUND
Sd mixer
Post prod sd
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Asst to the prod
Prod services and equip provided by
Burbank, California
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Girls of Penfield
Basic Training
Death of Her Innocence
Release Date:
10 April 1974
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 April 1974
Los Angeles opening: 26 April 1974
Production Date:
began 24 September 1973
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 April 1974
Copyright Number:
LP43757
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
88, 90-91 or 96
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1955 Springfield, Massachusetts, high school seniors Abby Reed and Muffy Pratt share a dormitory room at Penfield Academy, an all-girls boarding school. On the first day of fall semester, Abby tells Muffy that she almost had sex with her boyfriend, Michael, over the summer, and the girls quickly acquire demerits for talking during chapel and, later, after lights out. One evening at dinner, Mrs. Pendleton informs the junior and senior girls that they are invited to a mixer the following night with boys from Michael’s school, St. Ambrose. At the dance, the girls and boys are paired up randomly after picking numbers. Abby steals away to talk to Michael, who pleads with her to visit him soon. Meanwhile, Muffy’s dance partner, Buzzy Knight, offers another boy money to switch girls. Offended, Muffy runs away, and a boy named Malcolm searches for her. At the end of the night, Abby promises Michael she will take an overnight trip to visit him in two weeks. When Abby returns to the dormitory, she finds Muffy crying. At first, Muffy won’t admit why she is upset, but she later confesses that Buzzy hurt her feelings at the dance, and though Abby tries to cheer her up by saying that Malcolm is in love with her, Muffy does not have feelings for Malcolm. One weekend, Abby takes a train to meet Michael after lying to Mrs. Pendleton that she is visiting her grandmother. Michael and Abby check into a hotel where they have booked two separate rooms. Michael meets Abby in her room that evening, and they make love. Afterward, Abby mourns the loss of her virginity, but Michael promises that he won’t ... +


In 1955 Springfield, Massachusetts, high school seniors Abby Reed and Muffy Pratt share a dormitory room at Penfield Academy, an all-girls boarding school. On the first day of fall semester, Abby tells Muffy that she almost had sex with her boyfriend, Michael, over the summer, and the girls quickly acquire demerits for talking during chapel and, later, after lights out. One evening at dinner, Mrs. Pendleton informs the junior and senior girls that they are invited to a mixer the following night with boys from Michael’s school, St. Ambrose. At the dance, the girls and boys are paired up randomly after picking numbers. Abby steals away to talk to Michael, who pleads with her to visit him soon. Meanwhile, Muffy’s dance partner, Buzzy Knight, offers another boy money to switch girls. Offended, Muffy runs away, and a boy named Malcolm searches for her. At the end of the night, Abby promises Michael she will take an overnight trip to visit him in two weeks. When Abby returns to the dormitory, she finds Muffy crying. At first, Muffy won’t admit why she is upset, but she later confesses that Buzzy hurt her feelings at the dance, and though Abby tries to cheer her up by saying that Malcolm is in love with her, Muffy does not have feelings for Malcolm. One weekend, Abby takes a train to meet Michael after lying to Mrs. Pendleton that she is visiting her grandmother. Michael and Abby check into a hotel where they have booked two separate rooms. Michael meets Abby in her room that evening, and they make love. Afterward, Abby mourns the loss of her virginity, but Michael promises that he won’t stop loving her. Back at school, Muffy receives a letter from Buzzy, apologizing for his behavior at the dance. Suspicious of Buzzy, Abby tries to discourage her friend from writing back, but Muffy sends him a letter in response, inviting Buzzy to a Christmas Eve party at Abby’s family home. At the party, Malcolm warns Muffy against spending time with Buzzy, but she refuses to listen and finds Buzzy under the mistletoe where she gives him a kiss. Indifferent to Muffy’s advances, Buzzy takes another girl’s hand and leads her away, causing Muffy to leave the party. Malcolm finds Muffy on the front lawn, and she propositions him to make love; he resists, saying she’s in the wrong state of mind, but after she taunts him, he agrees, and they have sex in the backseat of a car. Before returning to the party, Malcolm confesses that he was a virgin until now and Muffy says she feels no different after having sex and doesn’t see “what all the big fuss is about.” Back at school, Muffy suspects she is pregnant and later confirms the news at a doctor’s office. She asks the doctor if he can perform an abortion and he says no, also refusing to refer her to any other doctors. Later, Michael and Malcolm accompany Abby and Muffy to a nearby city where Michael has found someone to perform the abortion. The night before the procedure, Abby tells Muffy that Malcolm wants to marry her, but Muffy rejects the idea, saying she wants to have control over her life. In the morning, the group goes to the office of a man named Marge who demands money upfront, then drives Muffy and Abby to a warehouse. There, a woman called Mrs. H. separates them, and Abby cries as Muffy is led upstairs, encouraging her friend to call off the procedure if she doesn’t feel like doing it. Muffy meets the doctor, Frank, who says he is a medical student and promises the abortion will be simple and painless. After the procedure, Muffy joins Abby downstairs and seemingly feels fine. However, once they return to school, Muffy becomes ill and refuses to allow Abby to tell the school nurse what has caused her hemorrhaging. Soon after, Malcolm, Michael, and Abby go to visit Muffy at the hospital and learn that she has died. On the day of graduation, Abby lies on Muffy’s bed and cries before putting on her cap and leaving for the ceremony. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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