Cross-Examination (1932)

72 mins | Drama | 13 February 1932

Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Feb 32
p. 11.
Harrison's Reports
20 Feb 32
p. 31.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 32
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Jan 32
p. 27.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Feb 32
p. 35.
New York Times
27 Feb 32
p. 22.
Variety
1 Mar 32
p. 21.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 February 1932
Production Date:
began late January 1932
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone
Black and White
gauge
35mm
Widescreen/ratio
1.37:1
Duration(in mins):
72
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When wealthy patriarch Emory Wells is found slain in his home and the family diamonds are discovered missing, Emory's son David is accused of his murder and the theft. At the trial, various members of the household provide testimony as to their whereabouts when Emory was shot: Martha Gregory, the housekeeper; Raymond Boggs, the butler; Warren Slade, Emory's attorney; Inez Wells, Emory's new young wife; Etta Billing, the downstairs maid; Lieutenant Elkins of the Homicide Squad; Ralph Varney, whose estranged wife is David's girl friend; Mrs. Grace Varney; and finally, David. David had left home months earlier after a dispute with his father, but returned that night to ask his father for some money. He intended to use the money to pay for Grace's divorce so they could be married. Believing his son to be greedy, Emory refused to give him either the money, or the family diamonds, which were rightfully his. When David refuses to say where he went after he left the Wells's home, Mary Stevens volunteers the information and is sworn in. Mary reveals herself as David's true mother, who had been a maid in the home of Emory's aunt. Emory's family threatened to disinherit Emory if he married Mary, so she gave up her son so he could be reared with all the "advantages" of wealth. David found her three months earlier and rented an apartment for her, where he met Grace, who felt trapped in an unhappy marriage. Mary affirms that Emory was alive after David left him, because she talked with him. David is found not guilty, but the strain proves too much for Mary. On her ... +


When wealthy patriarch Emory Wells is found slain in his home and the family diamonds are discovered missing, Emory's son David is accused of his murder and the theft. At the trial, various members of the household provide testimony as to their whereabouts when Emory was shot: Martha Gregory, the housekeeper; Raymond Boggs, the butler; Warren Slade, Emory's attorney; Inez Wells, Emory's new young wife; Etta Billing, the downstairs maid; Lieutenant Elkins of the Homicide Squad; Ralph Varney, whose estranged wife is David's girl friend; Mrs. Grace Varney; and finally, David. David had left home months earlier after a dispute with his father, but returned that night to ask his father for some money. He intended to use the money to pay for Grace's divorce so they could be married. Believing his son to be greedy, Emory refused to give him either the money, or the family diamonds, which were rightfully his. When David refuses to say where he went after he left the Wells's home, Mary Stevens volunteers the information and is sworn in. Mary reveals herself as David's true mother, who had been a maid in the home of Emory's aunt. Emory's family threatened to disinherit Emory if he married Mary, so she gave up her son so he could be reared with all the "advantages" of wealth. David found her three months earlier and rented an apartment for her, where he met Grace, who felt trapped in an unhappy marriage. Mary affirms that Emory was alive after David left him, because she talked with him. David is found not guilty, but the strain proves too much for Mary. On her deathbed, Mary confesses to murdering Emory, and stealing the diamonds after he refused to help David. The mystery solved, David and Grace are free to pursue their marriage plans. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.