Hide-Out (1934)

80 or 82 mins | Comedy-drama | 24 August 1934

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Producer:

Hunt Stromberg

Cinematographers:

Sidney Wagner, Ray June

Editor:

Basil Wrangell

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to HR news items, Hal Rosson was first assigned to photograph this film. Because of illness, he was replaced by Ray June prior to the start of production. HR news items also note that, after she received word that her father was seriously ill in Ireland, Maureen O'Sullivan left the project and was replaced by Loretta Young. However, when Loretta Young was hospitalized just before production, M-G-M re-hired O'Sullivan, who then cancelled her plans to go to Ireland. Because of these setbacks, the start of production was delayed by a week, and Van Dyke was forced to change his first week's shooting schedule to accomodate his missing stars. Scenes for the film were shot in Santa Cruz, CA, according to news items. Writer Mauri Grashin was nominated for a "Best Story" Academy Award but lost to Arthur Caesar and M-G-M's Manhattan Melodrama . In 1941, Robert Sinclair directed Virginia Weidler and Paul Kelly in I'll Wait for You , an M-G-M remake of Grashin's ... More Less

According to HR news items, Hal Rosson was first assigned to photograph this film. Because of illness, he was replaced by Ray June prior to the start of production. HR news items also note that, after she received word that her father was seriously ill in Ireland, Maureen O'Sullivan left the project and was replaced by Loretta Young. However, when Loretta Young was hospitalized just before production, M-G-M re-hired O'Sullivan, who then cancelled her plans to go to Ireland. Because of these setbacks, the start of production was delayed by a week, and Van Dyke was forced to change his first week's shooting schedule to accomodate his missing stars. Scenes for the film were shot in Santa Cruz, CA, according to news items. Writer Mauri Grashin was nominated for a "Best Story" Academy Award but lost to Arthur Caesar and M-G-M's Manhattan Melodrama . In 1941, Robert Sinclair directed Virginia Weidler and Paul Kelly in I'll Wait for You , an M-G-M remake of Grashin's story. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Jul 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Aug 34
p. 4.
HF
16 Jun 34
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 34
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 34
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 34
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 34
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 34
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
31 Jul 34
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
11 Aug 34
pp. 34-35.
New York Times
25 Aug 34
p. 16.
Variety
28 Aug 34
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A W. S. Van Dyke Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Contr to scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
DANCE
Dance numbers staged by
Dance numbers staged by
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Dream Was So Beautiful" and "All I Do Is Dream of You," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 August 1934
Production Date:
14 June--early July 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 August 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4915
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 82
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
126
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After Lucky Wilson, a Broadway playboy and the "strong man" of racketeer Tony Berrelli, forces the owner of a New York nightclub to pay protection money, he is threatened with arrest by MacCarthy, a police lieutenant. Confident that the police will never arrest him, Lucky continues his illegal practices until one angry nightclub owner finally presses charges against him. Although aware that a warrant has been issued, Lucky insists on returning to his hotel to rendezvous with a woman before retreating to the Catskills. After he convinces the woman to accompany him to the mountains, Lucky is surrounded by the police and is shot while fleeing to his automobile. The wounded Lucky drives himself to Connecticut and is finally taken in by the Millers, a generous farm family who believe that he himself was the victim of racketeers' violence. On Lucky's orders, unsuspecting Henry "Pa" Miller, notifies Berrelli of Lucky's whereabouts and requests that the gang's doctor be sent. When the alcoholic Dr. Warner arrives at the Millers', he finds Lucky bedridden and anxious to return to the city. However, as soon as Lucky meets Pauline, Pa's pretty twenty-year-old daughter, he tells the doctor he has changed his mind and is now content to recuperate in Connecticut. Warner leaves empty-handed, and Lucky begins to romance schoolteacher Pauline, who like the rest of her family, has no suspicions about his identity. In the process, Lucky learns about farm life and is taught by Pauline to perform such mundane chores as cow milking and chicken feeding. Lucky even befriends Willie, Pauline's young, ever-present brother. A week later, while Pa, "Ma" and Willie take a day-trip to ... +


After Lucky Wilson, a Broadway playboy and the "strong man" of racketeer Tony Berrelli, forces the owner of a New York nightclub to pay protection money, he is threatened with arrest by MacCarthy, a police lieutenant. Confident that the police will never arrest him, Lucky continues his illegal practices until one angry nightclub owner finally presses charges against him. Although aware that a warrant has been issued, Lucky insists on returning to his hotel to rendezvous with a woman before retreating to the Catskills. After he convinces the woman to accompany him to the mountains, Lucky is surrounded by the police and is shot while fleeing to his automobile. The wounded Lucky drives himself to Connecticut and is finally taken in by the Millers, a generous farm family who believe that he himself was the victim of racketeers' violence. On Lucky's orders, unsuspecting Henry "Pa" Miller, notifies Berrelli of Lucky's whereabouts and requests that the gang's doctor be sent. When the alcoholic Dr. Warner arrives at the Millers', he finds Lucky bedridden and anxious to return to the city. However, as soon as Lucky meets Pauline, Pa's pretty twenty-year-old daughter, he tells the doctor he has changed his mind and is now content to recuperate in Connecticut. Warner leaves empty-handed, and Lucky begins to romance schoolteacher Pauline, who like the rest of her family, has no suspicions about his identity. In the process, Lucky learns about farm life and is taught by Pauline to perform such mundane chores as cow milking and chicken feeding. Lucky even befriends Willie, Pauline's young, ever-present brother. A week later, while Pa, "Ma" and Willie take a day-trip to a relative's house, Lucky and Pauline picnic together and are caught in a rainstorm. The couple take cover in a deserted cabin, shed their wet clothes and warm themselves in front of a fire. In spite of his desires, Lucky refuses to seduce Pauline, who has confessed her love to him, and insists that they return home immediately. At the farm, Lucky is greeted by MacCarthy and his assistant Britt, and while resigned to his arrest, begs MacCarthy not to reveal his mission to the Millers. Touched by the Millers' warmth and innocence, MacCarthy and Britt, who have been forced by the storm to stay at the farm for dinner, pretend to be Lucky's business associates and then allow Lucky to say a private farewell to Pauline. Once alone with Pauline, Lucky confesses his past but swears his love and vows to return to Connecticut an honest man. After Lucky receives a heartfelt goodbye from the Millers, Pauline tells him that she will indeed wait for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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