Next Time We Love (1936)

85 or 87 mins | Melodrama | 27 January 1936

Director:

Edward H. Griffith

Writer:

Melville Baker

Cinematographer:

Joseph Valentine

Editor:

Ted J. Kent

Production Designer:

Charles D. Hall

Production Company:

Universal Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Ursula Parrott's novel was first titled Say Goodbye Again and was serialized in McCall's from Dec 1934--Apr 1935 under that title. The working title of the film was Next Time We Live . According to a DV news item, director Edward Griffith and studio executives debated over the title of the film, because Griffith felt that the title Next Time We Live would attract patrons because it was the title of the novel, while executives felt that the novel's title "might deflect prospective patrons who don't like reincarnation ring." DV news items also report the following: Three weeks into production, writer Doris Anderson was "teamed" with Melville Baker to complete the script. Shooting had begun with only half of the script written by Baker. Francis Lederer was originally cast for the lead role, but was unavailable due to prior commitments. Production was delayed because Margaret Sullavan was busy shooting retakes for Paramount's film So Red the Rose (see below). Universal gaffer Max Nippel 's newborn infant appeared in the film. Assistant director Ralph Slosser testified at a National Labor Relations Board investigation in 1938 that he directed some scenes for this film in San Francisco using doubles, following a request that he do so by the studio, and that he also directed some studio scenes; the investigation was concerned with the question of whether assistant directors were ever called on to direct scenes. According to a modern source, Sullavan was responsible for the casting of James Stewart in this ... More Less

Ursula Parrott's novel was first titled Say Goodbye Again and was serialized in McCall's from Dec 1934--Apr 1935 under that title. The working title of the film was Next Time We Live . According to a DV news item, director Edward Griffith and studio executives debated over the title of the film, because Griffith felt that the title Next Time We Live would attract patrons because it was the title of the novel, while executives felt that the novel's title "might deflect prospective patrons who don't like reincarnation ring." DV news items also report the following: Three weeks into production, writer Doris Anderson was "teamed" with Melville Baker to complete the script. Shooting had begun with only half of the script written by Baker. Francis Lederer was originally cast for the lead role, but was unavailable due to prior commitments. Production was delayed because Margaret Sullavan was busy shooting retakes for Paramount's film So Red the Rose (see below). Universal gaffer Max Nippel 's newborn infant appeared in the film. Assistant director Ralph Slosser testified at a National Labor Relations Board investigation in 1938 that he directed some scenes for this film in San Francisco using doubles, following a request that he do so by the studio, and that he also directed some studio scenes; the investigation was concerned with the question of whether assistant directors were ever called on to direct scenes. According to a modern source, Sullavan was responsible for the casting of James Stewart in this role. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Aug 35
p. 5.
Daily Variety
6 Oct 35
p. 11.
Daily Variety
30 Oct 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Nov 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
7 Dec 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
30 Dec 35
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 Jan 36
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Oct 38
p. 7.
Film Daily
31 Jan 36
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Jan 36
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
11 Jan 36
p. 26.
New York Times
31 Jan 36
p. 16.
Variety
5 Feb 36
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Paul Kohner Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Spec cine
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Ed supv
COSTUMES
Gowns
Des
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd supv
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
Prod secy
STAND INS
Stand-in for Margaret Sullavan
Stand-in for James Stewart
Stand-in for Raymond Milland
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Next Time We Live by Ursula Parrott (New York, 1935).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Next Time We Live
Release Date:
27 January 1936
Production Date:
21 October--30 December 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 February 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6116
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85 or 87
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1912
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1927, Cicely Hunt is so head-over-heels in love with Christopher Tyler that she marries him in New York instead of returning to college. To make ends meet, Chris's friend, Tommy Abbott, helps Cicely find an acting job, while Chris works as a small-time journalist. Chris's joy at obtaining a management job at his newspaper's office in Rome is dampened because Cicely refuses to go with him, preferring to stay in New York to pursue her theatrical career. After he leaves, she confides in Tommy that she is pregnant, and did not want her condition to interfere with Chris's career. Months later, Chris loses his job because he leaves Europe when Tommy wires him of his wife's childbirth, instead of turning in an article on a serious political situation in Italy. In New York, he discovers he has a son named Kit, but becomes dejected when he can only find work at a lowly city news bureau. Cicely accepts Tommy's offer of a three hundred dollar loan and a part in a theater production. Chris becomes more depressed when Cicely tells him of her prospective employment, so she goes to see his former managing editor, Frank Carteret, and convinces him to offer Chris another position, even though it means he will be posted in Russia. Through the years, Chris becomes a noted journalist and Cicely becomes an acclaimed actress, but they become estranged from one another because of the long absences. One year after a brief visit from Chris, Tommy confesses to Cicely that he has always loved her, and would like her to divorce Chris and marry him. Although she ... +


In 1927, Cicely Hunt is so head-over-heels in love with Christopher Tyler that she marries him in New York instead of returning to college. To make ends meet, Chris's friend, Tommy Abbott, helps Cicely find an acting job, while Chris works as a small-time journalist. Chris's joy at obtaining a management job at his newspaper's office in Rome is dampened because Cicely refuses to go with him, preferring to stay in New York to pursue her theatrical career. After he leaves, she confides in Tommy that she is pregnant, and did not want her condition to interfere with Chris's career. Months later, Chris loses his job because he leaves Europe when Tommy wires him of his wife's childbirth, instead of turning in an article on a serious political situation in Italy. In New York, he discovers he has a son named Kit, but becomes dejected when he can only find work at a lowly city news bureau. Cicely accepts Tommy's offer of a three hundred dollar loan and a part in a theater production. Chris becomes more depressed when Cicely tells him of her prospective employment, so she goes to see his former managing editor, Frank Carteret, and convinces him to offer Chris another position, even though it means he will be posted in Russia. Through the years, Chris becomes a noted journalist and Cicely becomes an acclaimed actress, but they become estranged from one another because of the long absences. One year after a brief visit from Chris, Tommy confesses to Cicely that he has always loved her, and would like her to divorce Chris and marry him. Although she is deeply fond of Tommy, Cicely is unable to let go of Chris in her heart, and vows she will wait for him, no matter how long it takes for them to be together. Unknown to Cicely, Chris has been diagnosed with a fatal disease and has resigned from his work and is living at a sanitarium in Switzerland. While Kit stays with Tommy in California, Cicely meets Chris in St. Anton, Switzerland. Chris lies and says that she should divorce him, as there are many days when she is not in his thoughts. Cicely is heartbroken, but still proposes they spend three days together. Chris secretly checks out of the hotel and boards a train for the sanitarium, but Cicely finds him and draws the truth out of him--that he is dying and has always loved her. They embrace and depart together on the train. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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