Carolina (1934)

82-83 mins | Drama | 2 February 1934

Director:

Henry King

Cinematographer:

Hal Mohr

Editor:

Robert Bassler

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a 20 Jul 1933 FD news item, director Henry King was going to "Carolina and Georgia" to search for location sites, and "members of [his] unit" included W. F. Fitzgerald, Max Larey and Jack Otterson. According to an unidentified, contemporary news item in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library, Lew Ayres was considered for the lead, and Ralph Morgan was signed for an important character role. Actors Lionel Barrymore and Robert Young were borrowed from M-G-M for this production.
       Actor Joe Young, who had a minor role in the film, was the brother of Robert Young; this was their first film appearance together. Joe Young, who soon changed his name to Roger Moore, acted in dozens of small roles from the 1930s through the early 1950s, most at M-G-M. He should not be confused with the more famous English actor also named Roger Moore.
       The House of Connelly was the first play produced by the Group Theatre. According to a modern interview with King, the Hays Office would not let Fox use the title The House of Connelly for the film because of the play's theme of miscegenation. King also noted that he and scriptwriter Reginald Berkeley traveled to South Carolina, where they filmed background shots to be included in the picture and photographed a house that was recreated on the Fox ... More Less

According to a 20 Jul 1933 FD news item, director Henry King was going to "Carolina and Georgia" to search for location sites, and "members of [his] unit" included W. F. Fitzgerald, Max Larey and Jack Otterson. According to an unidentified, contemporary news item in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library, Lew Ayres was considered for the lead, and Ralph Morgan was signed for an important character role. Actors Lionel Barrymore and Robert Young were borrowed from M-G-M for this production.
       Actor Joe Young, who had a minor role in the film, was the brother of Robert Young; this was their first film appearance together. Joe Young, who soon changed his name to Roger Moore, acted in dozens of small roles from the 1930s through the early 1950s, most at M-G-M. He should not be confused with the more famous English actor also named Roger Moore.
       The House of Connelly was the first play produced by the Group Theatre. According to a modern interview with King, the Hays Office would not let Fox use the title The House of Connelly for the film because of the play's theme of miscegenation. King also noted that he and scriptwriter Reginald Berkeley traveled to South Carolina, where they filmed background shots to be included in the picture and photographed a house that was recreated on the Fox lot. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17-Feb-34
---
Daily Variety
23 Jan 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Jul 33
p. 8.
Film Daily
3 Feb 34
p. 4.
HF
4 Nov 33
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 33
p. 3.
Los Angeles Post Record
9-Feb-34
---
Motion Picture Daily
26 Jan 34
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
3 Feb 34
p. 33.
New York Times
16 Feb 34
p. 17.
Variety
20 Feb 34
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The House of Connelly by Paul Green (New York, 28 Sep 1931).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Carolina," words and music by Lew Brown and Jay Gorney.
COMPOSERS
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 February 1934
Production Date:
began early November 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
2 February 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4468
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82-83
Length(in feet):
7,600
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Forty years after the Civil War, the once proud Connelly family of Carolina is reduced to poverty as their plantation falls to ruin. The family, which consists of matriarch Ellen, her daughter Geraldine, her son Will and her brother-in-law Bob, a famed veteran, hopes that through a marriage between Will and wealthy Virginia Buchanan, they will be able to restore their home to its former grandeur. To Ellen's dismay, however, Will falls in love with Joanna Tate, the daughter of their Yankee tenant farmer. When Mr. Tate dies, Ellen allows Joanna and her young brothers, Jackie and Harry, to stay on, despite Joanna's insistence on planting tobacco, which Ellen regards as unprofitable and undignified. The spirited Joanna tries to convince Will that he could rebuild the Connelly empire by starting from scratch, just as his great-grandfather did. Ellen attempts to come between the lovers at a party being given for Virginia, when she tells them that they must stop seeing each other because Joanna is of a lower social position. The couple refuses to listen, however, and spends a blissful evening full of declarations of love. The next day, Ellen orders Will to accompany Virginia to Charleston, where Virginia's bank is prepared to take over the mortgage on the Connelly home. Meanwhile, Joanna and local storekeeper Richards discuss the potential of her tobacco crop, which promises to be exceptionally profitable. Ellen sends for Joanna, but not to discuss the crop, as Joanna assumes. Ellen instead orders Joanna to move out because of her refusal to stop seeing Will. Joanna is shaken by Ellen's declaration, and by the rumor that Will is in Charleston ... +


Forty years after the Civil War, the once proud Connelly family of Carolina is reduced to poverty as their plantation falls to ruin. The family, which consists of matriarch Ellen, her daughter Geraldine, her son Will and her brother-in-law Bob, a famed veteran, hopes that through a marriage between Will and wealthy Virginia Buchanan, they will be able to restore their home to its former grandeur. To Ellen's dismay, however, Will falls in love with Joanna Tate, the daughter of their Yankee tenant farmer. When Mr. Tate dies, Ellen allows Joanna and her young brothers, Jackie and Harry, to stay on, despite Joanna's insistence on planting tobacco, which Ellen regards as unprofitable and undignified. The spirited Joanna tries to convince Will that he could rebuild the Connelly empire by starting from scratch, just as his great-grandfather did. Ellen attempts to come between the lovers at a party being given for Virginia, when she tells them that they must stop seeing each other because Joanna is of a lower social position. The couple refuses to listen, however, and spends a blissful evening full of declarations of love. The next day, Ellen orders Will to accompany Virginia to Charleston, where Virginia's bank is prepared to take over the mortgage on the Connelly home. Meanwhile, Joanna and local storekeeper Richards discuss the potential of her tobacco crop, which promises to be exceptionally profitable. Ellen sends for Joanna, but not to discuss the crop, as Joanna assumes. Ellen instead orders Joanna to move out because of her refusal to stop seeing Will. Joanna is shaken by Ellen's declaration, and by the rumor that Will is in Charleston to get married, but still tries to get Ellen to change her mind. Will returns home after telling Virginia that he cannot marry her, and he finds out about Ellen's edict. As Joanna and the family discuss the issue, they discover that forty years earlier, Ellen, always watchful of the Connelly social standing, also interfered in Bob's love life. She had informed Bob's sweetheart, who was Geraldine's governess and Joanna's grandmother, that Bob was killed in battle so that she would leave before Bob returned to marry her. The revelation disturbs Bob's confused mind and he shoots himself, after which a shocked Joanna prepares to leave, while Will remains locked in his room for two days. Richards tries to convince Joanna to stay, but she is adamant until Will at last leaves his room and pleads with her. Joanna then tells Ellen her vision of the Connelly greatness being restored by tobacco, and as the years pass, the hard work of Joanna and Will pays off. With the family fortune regained, Ellen happily plays with her grandchildren, Joan and Will, by telling them a fairy tale while Joanna and Will go to the store. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.