The Voice of Bugle Ann (1936)

70 or 72 mins | Drama | 15 February 1936

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

George Boemler

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

MacKinlay Kantor wrote a sequel to his novel, entitled The Daughter of Bugle Ann , in 1953. According to HR news items, James Stewart was originally cast in the part taken over by Eric Linden. Portions of the picture were shot on location in the San Fernando Valley and Burbank, California, and background shots, including the hunts, were shot on location in the Ozark Mountains in Missouri under Richard Thorpe's direction. An early production chart in HR included Claude Gillingwater in the film, however, he was not in the viewed print and may have been replaced during the filming. Lionel Barrymore and Anne Shirley starred in a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story on 6 Jul 1936. The type of fox hunting shown in the film was, according to reviews, indigenous to Missouri. In the Missouri hunts recreated, dogs chase the fox until he runs up a tree, then retreat when the hunt master blows his horn: the fox is neither killed nor ... More Less

MacKinlay Kantor wrote a sequel to his novel, entitled The Daughter of Bugle Ann , in 1953. According to HR news items, James Stewart was originally cast in the part taken over by Eric Linden. Portions of the picture were shot on location in the San Fernando Valley and Burbank, California, and background shots, including the hunts, were shot on location in the Ozark Mountains in Missouri under Richard Thorpe's direction. An early production chart in HR included Claude Gillingwater in the film, however, he was not in the viewed print and may have been replaced during the filming. Lionel Barrymore and Anne Shirley starred in a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story on 6 Jul 1936. The type of fox hunting shown in the film was, according to reviews, indigenous to Missouri. In the Missouri hunts recreated, dogs chase the fox until he runs up a tree, then retreat when the hunt master blows his horn: the fox is neither killed nor injured. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Oct 35
p. 5.
Daily Variety
25 Nov 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
30 Dec 35
p. 4.
Daily Variety
1 Feb 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Feb 36
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 35
p. 3, 4
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 35
p. 3, 14
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
3 Feb 36
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald
1 Feb 36
p. 45.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Feb 36
p. 42.
New York Times
27 Feb 36
p. 23.
Variety
4 Mar 36
p. 26.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Asst to the prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
Addl mus
Addl mus
Addl mus
Arr of medley of old songs
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Voice of Bugle Ann by MacKinlay Kantor (New York, 1935).
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 February 1936
Production Date:
25 November--30 December 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
5 February 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6122
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 72
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1988
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, local farmers participate in fox hunts with special dogs that they breed. Spring Davis, a local farmer, loves his dogs very much, especially "Molly," and when Molly dies giving birth to a litter of pups, the saddened Spring favors the runt of the litter, "Miss Ann." As Ann matures, she develops a rare "bugle voice" bark, so the proud Spring calls her "Bugle Ann." On the night of Ann's first hunt, she comports herself like a champion, pleasing Spring, but the evening is marred by the discovery that their mean-spirited neighbor, Jacob Terry, is erecting a fence on his property to raise sheep. Spring and Terry argue over the fence and, after Terry threatens to shoot any dog that comes on his property, Spring warns him that he will "blow him clean to glory" if he shoots a dog. Despite Spring and Terry's animosity, Spring's son Benjy and Terry's daughter Camden are in love. Though Spring recognizes that Camden is not like her father, Terry feels nothing but hatred toward Benjy and warns Camden not to see the boy again. That night, Terry hits Camden, and she packs up and drives away, leaving her father alone. Because Cal Royster, one of Spring's friends, hears a dog's yelp coming from Terry's farm and Ann has not returned home, the next day the Roysters, Spring and other local farmers arm themselves and go looking for her at Terry's farm. Spring finds a three-toed track in the dirt that could only have been made by Ann and angrily confronts Terry, who denies that he has harmed the dog. He ... +


In the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, local farmers participate in fox hunts with special dogs that they breed. Spring Davis, a local farmer, loves his dogs very much, especially "Molly," and when Molly dies giving birth to a litter of pups, the saddened Spring favors the runt of the litter, "Miss Ann." As Ann matures, she develops a rare "bugle voice" bark, so the proud Spring calls her "Bugle Ann." On the night of Ann's first hunt, she comports herself like a champion, pleasing Spring, but the evening is marred by the discovery that their mean-spirited neighbor, Jacob Terry, is erecting a fence on his property to raise sheep. Spring and Terry argue over the fence and, after Terry threatens to shoot any dog that comes on his property, Spring warns him that he will "blow him clean to glory" if he shoots a dog. Despite Spring and Terry's animosity, Spring's son Benjy and Terry's daughter Camden are in love. Though Spring recognizes that Camden is not like her father, Terry feels nothing but hatred toward Benjy and warns Camden not to see the boy again. That night, Terry hits Camden, and she packs up and drives away, leaving her father alone. Because Cal Royster, one of Spring's friends, hears a dog's yelp coming from Terry's farm and Ann has not returned home, the next day the Roysters, Spring and other local farmers arm themselves and go looking for her at Terry's farm. Spring finds a three-toed track in the dirt that could only have been made by Ann and angrily confronts Terry, who denies that he has harmed the dog. He then takes aim at Spring with his rifle, but before Terry can shoot, Spring shoots and kills him. Because neither Ann nor her body has been found, Spring is convicted of killing Terry and sentenced to twenty years in prison. Within a year, the sound of Ann's voice has been heard at night throughout the county, and many believe that it is the voice of a ghost. Two years later, however, Ann's body is found, strangled in a wire fence in the hills, and everyone realizes that Terry had not killed her after all. Another year passes, and Spring is suddenly pardoned by the governor and comes home to learn about Ann. On the night of his homecoming, Spring decides to go on a hunt and hears a bugle bark in the distance. Just then, Camden comes to his camp fire and says that the voice is that of a pup she has reared, the daughter of Ann and a champion dog called "Proctor Pride." She then reveals that she had accidentally hit Ann with her car on the night she ran away. She then cared for the dog, who had four pups, one of whom inherited Ann's bugle voice. Ann was eventually killed as she was chasing a fox running toward home. Camden also reveals that it was she who enabled Spring to be released by petitioning the governor. Finally, Camden and Benjy are free to start their life together and Spring looks forward to years of hunting with Ann's daughter, "Little Lady." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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