Dinner at the Ritz (1937)

75-76 or 78 mins | Romance, Mystery | 26 November 1937

Director:

Harold Schuster

Cinematographer:

Philip Tannura

Production Designer:

Frank Wells

Production Companies:

New World Pictures, Ltd., Devonshire Films
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HISTORY

The working titles for this film were Riviera and Follow the Sun. Information found in the Twentieth Century-Fox Legal Files at the UCLA Theater Arts Libarary indicate that Flossie Freedman was hired to help actress Annabella perfect her English and diction for this film. While the onscreen credits list Denvonshire Films as the production company, most contemporary sources credit New World Picture, Ltd. in its place. According to MPH, this was the third film by New World in which Annabella starred. Modern sources indictate that actor David Niven was loaned to New World by Samuel Goldwyn, to whom he was under contract. The film was re-issued in Great Britain in 1948, and in the United States in 1953. ...

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The working titles for this film were Riviera and Follow the Sun. Information found in the Twentieth Century-Fox Legal Files at the UCLA Theater Arts Libarary indicate that Flossie Freedman was hired to help actress Annabella perfect her English and diction for this film. While the onscreen credits list Denvonshire Films as the production company, most contemporary sources credit New World Picture, Ltd. in its place. According to MPH, this was the third film by New World in which Annabella starred. Modern sources indictate that actor David Niven was loaned to New World by Samuel Goldwyn, to whom he was under contract. The film was re-issued in Great Britain in 1948, and in the United States in 1953.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Corporate note credit:
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1-Jan-38
---
Film Daily
9 Dec 1937
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 1937
p. 9
Motion Picture Herald
13 Nov 1937
pp. 48-49
New York Times
4 Dec 1937
p. 21
Variety
10 Nov 1937
p. 19
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Follow the Sun
Riviera
Release Date:
26 November 1937
Production Date:
at Denham Studios, England
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
26 November 1937
LP7821
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75-76 or 78
Length(in feet):
6,986
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Paris, the beautiful Ranie Racine, daughter of noted investment banker Henri Racine, has just become engaged to the wealthy Baron Philip de Beaufort. Though she does not love Philip, Ranie agrees to the marriage at the behest of her beloved father. Racine discovers that his fortune has been embezzled, and he suspects six men. Meanwhile, while Ranie attempts to go shopping, she has an auto accident with suave Carl-Paul de Brack, who is immediately attracted to her. That night, a masked ball is held, and Paul crashes the party. In a side room, Racine tells Philip about the embezzlement and that he suspects fellow businessman Brogard, prompting Philip to implicate himself in the conspiracy and suggests that Racine join their side by letting his fellow investors absorb the loss. Racine refuses, and adds Philip's name to a letter he sends to the Regent of France. Shortly thereafter, Racine is murdered. With all her father's money gone, Ranie breaks her engagement to Philip, and auctions off all the family possessions. Ranie so impresses diamond merchant J. R. Devine at the auction that he hires her to help him sell his wares. Ranie then dyes her blonde hair black and pretends to be a Spanish refugee, forced to sell her jewels to cover her gambling debts in the south of France. On a train, Ranie meets American detective Jimmy Raine, who immediately recognizes her true identity and tells her that he is interested in finding her father's murderer. The group arrives in Monte Carlo, where Philip is also meeting with his fellow conspirators, who are being blackmailed by Duval, the Regent's secretary, ...

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In Paris, the beautiful Ranie Racine, daughter of noted investment banker Henri Racine, has just become engaged to the wealthy Baron Philip de Beaufort. Though she does not love Philip, Ranie agrees to the marriage at the behest of her beloved father. Racine discovers that his fortune has been embezzled, and he suspects six men. Meanwhile, while Ranie attempts to go shopping, she has an auto accident with suave Carl-Paul de Brack, who is immediately attracted to her. That night, a masked ball is held, and Paul crashes the party. In a side room, Racine tells Philip about the embezzlement and that he suspects fellow businessman Brogard, prompting Philip to implicate himself in the conspiracy and suggests that Racine join their side by letting his fellow investors absorb the loss. Racine refuses, and adds Philip's name to a letter he sends to the Regent of France. Shortly thereafter, Racine is murdered. With all her father's money gone, Ranie breaks her engagement to Philip, and auctions off all the family possessions. Ranie so impresses diamond merchant J. R. Devine at the auction that he hires her to help him sell his wares. Ranie then dyes her blonde hair black and pretends to be a Spanish refugee, forced to sell her jewels to cover her gambling debts in the south of France. On a train, Ranie meets American detective Jimmy Raine, who immediately recognizes her true identity and tells her that he is interested in finding her father's murderer. The group arrives in Monte Carlo, where Philip is also meeting with his fellow conspirators, who are being blackmailed by Duval, the Regent's secretary, who, in turn, has Racine's letter implicating them. Paul, who turns out to be a French government agent, is also in Monte Carlo. Not knowing Paul's true profession, both Ranie and Jimmy suspect him of the murder, though he proclaims to Ranie that he is on her side. Aboard Brogard's yacht in Cannes, Philip presents Duval's blackmail letter, demanding 5,000,000 francs. The group then travels to England, where Philip is to pay off the blackmailer. Ranie travels in the disguise of an Indian princess, and Paul once again recognizes her. Ranie searches Paul's room, where she finds a case of jewels, which she thinks are fakes stolen from her room. Paul arrives, and she learns that he had re-purchased for her the real jewels she had sold in Monte Carlo. Ranie breaks down, and confesses all to Paul. He tells her that he understands, and they kiss. Jimmy arrives and tells them that Philip is meeting with Duval aboard the "Sweet Lucy" houseboat. On the houseboat, Paul attempts to capture Duval, only to have Philip arrive and capture him. Philip admits that he killed Racine, then proceeds to kill Duval and burn the incriminating letter. Jimmy and Ranie arrive, and in the ensuing shootout, Philip is killed. Paul and Ranie then arrange a dinner at the Ritz with Brogard, where they re-acquire her father's bonds from the embezzler by pretending they have the incriminating letter. With her father's murder solved and his fortune restored, Paul and Ranie plan their upcoming wedding.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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