Eternal Love (1929)

60 mins | Romance | 11 May 1929

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HISTORY

The 16 Jun 1928 Motion Picture News announced that Ernest Lubitsch would direct the as yet untitled picture, which would feature an original story. John Barrymore and Camilla Horn were set to star, and United Artists Corp. (UA) would handle the release.
       The 7 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World reported that the film had been tentatively titled Conquest, and an early fall 1928 production start date was anticipated.
       According to the 14 Jul and 11 Aug 1928 Motion Picture News, Lubitsch was working on the original scenario with Hans Kraly at that time. However, the 25 Aug 1928 edition stated that the film would be an adaptation, written by Kraly, of Jakob Christoph Heer’s 1928 novel about a Swiss mountaineer, Der König der Bernina, Roman aus dem Schweizerischen Hochgebirge.
       After it was decided that the picture would incorporate sound and music, UA rushed completion of a newly built sound stage on its Hollywood, CA, studio lot, as reported in the 28 Jul 1928 Motion Picture News.
       The 24 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review noted the title change to King of the Mountains, and announced that the crew was en route that day to Banff, Alberta, Canada, to begin principal photography the following day. The 25 Aug 1928 start date was confirmed in the 29 Sep 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World production chart.
       On 8 Sep 1928, Exhibitors Daily Review announced that the film had again changed titles to Avalanche. However, the 12 Sep 1928 Var indicated that the Lubitch film ...

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The 16 Jun 1928 Motion Picture News announced that Ernest Lubitsch would direct the as yet untitled picture, which would feature an original story. John Barrymore and Camilla Horn were set to star, and United Artists Corp. (UA) would handle the release.
       The 7 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World reported that the film had been tentatively titled Conquest, and an early fall 1928 production start date was anticipated.
       According to the 14 Jul and 11 Aug 1928 Motion Picture News, Lubitsch was working on the original scenario with Hans Kraly at that time. However, the 25 Aug 1928 edition stated that the film would be an adaptation, written by Kraly, of Jakob Christoph Heer’s 1928 novel about a Swiss mountaineer, Der König der Bernina, Roman aus dem Schweizerischen Hochgebirge.
       After it was decided that the picture would incorporate sound and music, UA rushed completion of a newly built sound stage on its Hollywood, CA, studio lot, as reported in the 28 Jul 1928 Motion Picture News.
       The 24 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review noted the title change to King of the Mountains, and announced that the crew was en route that day to Banff, Alberta, Canada, to begin principal photography the following day. The 25 Aug 1928 start date was confirmed in the 29 Sep 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World production chart.
       On 8 Sep 1928, Exhibitors Daily Review announced that the film had again changed titles to Avalanche. However, the 12 Sep 1928 Var indicated that the Lubitch film was currently untitled. According to the Nov 1928 Close Up, the title was soon reverted to King of the Mountains after filmmakers learned that Avalanche had already been claimed for a forthcoming Lasky-Paramount production.
       The 24 Sep 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review and the 26 Sep 1928 Var reported that the company had returned from locations in the Canadian Rockies to Hollywood, where at least two more months of filming was expected to occur. The crew had experienced several landslides in the mountains, causing John Barrymore to suffer numerous ankle sprains. In addition, still photographer John Miehle sustained a broken nose, several crew members were bruised, and a camera was demolished. The 22 Dec 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World indicated that additional exterior scenes had been filmed in the Hollywood Hills.
       An entire Swiss village was recreated on the UA lot, designed by Walter Reimann, where synthetic snow fell for five days to create a “dazzling winter scene,” as noted in the 20 Oct and 27 Oct 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. The Jan 1929 Screenland stated that several hundred background actors were hired for a masquerade party sequence.
       The picture began with a $1.1 million budget, according to the 14 Nov 1928 Var, but with three weeks of production remaining, costs had already reached $950,000. John Barrymore reportedly received a salary of $150,000, and Lubitsch was stated to have earned $125,000. The 26 Nov 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review added Isabelle Sheridan to the cast.
       On 22 Dec 1928, Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced that filming had finished and that Lubitsch would personally title and edit most of the picture himself. However, the 6 Jan 1929 FD reported that Katherine Hilliker and H. H. Caldwell were currently titling the film, and Andrew Marton received credit for editing.
       The 5 Jan 1929 Motion Picture News announced the final title change to Eternal Love.
       The picture opened in New York City at the Rivoli Theatre on 11 May 1929, according to the 15 May 1929 Var review.
       Both Var and the 19 May 1929 FD reviews complained that Eternal Love was Barrymore’s “poorest to date.” Critics stated the story was “out-dated,” but praised Lubitsch’s direction.
       The film print for Eternal Love was fully restored by The Film Foundation, an organization founded in 1990 by director Martin Scorsese.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Close Up
Nov 1928
p. 61.
Exhibitors Daily Review
24 Aug 1928
p. 3.
Exhibitors Daily Review
31 Aug 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Daily Review
8 Sep 1928
p. 2.
Exhibitors Daily Review
24 Sep 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Daily Review
26 Nov 1928
p. 7.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
7 Jul 1928
p. 41.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
29 Sep 1928
p. 40.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
20 Oct 1928
p. 42.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
27 Oct 1928
p. 39.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1928
p. 50.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
22 Dec 1928
p. 33.
Film Daily
6 Jan 1929
p. 6.
Film Daily
13 May 1929
p. 2.
Film Daily
19 May 1929
p. 9.
Motion Picture News
16 Jun 1928
p. 2015.
Motion Picture News
14 Jul 1928
p. 140.
Motion Picture News
28 Jul 1928
p. 274.
Motion Picture News
11 Aug 1928
p. 460.
Motion Picture News
25 Aug 1928
p. 605.
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1928
p. 858.
Motion Picture News
5 Jan 1929
p. 36.
Motion Picture News
2 Feb 1929
p. 385.
New York Times
13 May 1929
p. 27.
Screenland
Jan 1929
pp. 86-87.
Variety
29 Aug 1928
p. 62.
Variety
12 Sep 1928
p. 10.
Variety
26 Sep 1928
p. 11.
Variety
7 Nov 1928
p. 16.
Variety
14 Nov 1928
p. 4.
Variety
2 Jan 1929
p. 16.
Variety
15 May 1929
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Ernst Lubitsch Production
United Artists Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Sets and Costumes by
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score created by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Der König der Bernina, Roman aus dem Schweizerischen Hochgebirge by Jakob Christoph Heer (Stuttgart, 1928).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Avalanche
Conquest
King of the Mountains
Release Date:
11 May 1929
Premiere Information:
New York opening at the Rivoli Theatre: 11 May 1929
Production Date:
began 25 Aug 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Feature Productions, Inc.
15 May 1929
LP530
Physical Properties:
Silent
Mus score and sd eff, Vitaphone
Silent
6,498 ft.
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
6,515
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In 1806, during armed conflict between France and Austria, peaceful Switzerland becomes an unwilling high road for both armies. Ordered by an invading French army to surrender their firearms, the liberty-loving mountaineers of a Swiss village capitulate only through the efforts of their pastor. Marcus Paltram, however, a reckless hunter, defies the order. Though loved by Ciglia, who is also sought by Lorenz Gruber, Marcus is obsessively adored by Pia, a wild mountain girl, who hates Ciglia and awaits an opportunity to separate her from Marcus. Sometime later, at a masquerade party in the village inn, Ciglia invites Marcus home in a drunken state; Pia, in disguise, follows and makes him a victim of her wiles. Later, when Pia's mother demands that justice be done to her daughter, Marcus disconsolately marries her, after which Ciglia and Gruber marry. Although Ciglia and Marcus have tried to forget each other, their love continues, and both are miserable in their respective marriages. One day, during a violent snow storm, Marcus is endangered, and Pia persuades the villagers to go on a rescue expedition. Infuriated by his wife's continuing love for Marcus, Gruber offers Marcus a bribe to leave the village. Marcus spurns the proposition and is forced to shoot Gruber in self-defense. When a wounded Gruber is rescued by his fellow villagers, he accuses Marcus of attempted murder, while Pia accuses Ciglia of complicity. Marcus and Ciglia then flee into the mountains with, pursued by the villagers. Resolving never again to be separated, Marcus and Ciglia pray to God to keep them together and embrace as they walk into the path of an ...

More Less

In 1806, during armed conflict between France and Austria, peaceful Switzerland becomes an unwilling high road for both armies. Ordered by an invading French army to surrender their firearms, the liberty-loving mountaineers of a Swiss village capitulate only through the efforts of their pastor. Marcus Paltram, however, a reckless hunter, defies the order. Though loved by Ciglia, who is also sought by Lorenz Gruber, Marcus is obsessively adored by Pia, a wild mountain girl, who hates Ciglia and awaits an opportunity to separate her from Marcus. Sometime later, at a masquerade party in the village inn, Ciglia invites Marcus home in a drunken state; Pia, in disguise, follows and makes him a victim of her wiles. Later, when Pia's mother demands that justice be done to her daughter, Marcus disconsolately marries her, after which Ciglia and Gruber marry. Although Ciglia and Marcus have tried to forget each other, their love continues, and both are miserable in their respective marriages. One day, during a violent snow storm, Marcus is endangered, and Pia persuades the villagers to go on a rescue expedition. Infuriated by his wife's continuing love for Marcus, Gruber offers Marcus a bribe to leave the village. Marcus spurns the proposition and is forced to shoot Gruber in self-defense. When a wounded Gruber is rescued by his fellow villagers, he accuses Marcus of attempted murder, while Pia accuses Ciglia of complicity. Marcus and Ciglia then flee into the mountains with, pursued by the villagers. Resolving never again to be separated, Marcus and Ciglia pray to God to keep them together and embrace as they walk into the path of an avalanche.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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