The Isle of Lost Ships (1923)

Melodrama | 19 March 1923

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HISTORY

Filming was set to begin 20 Nov 1922, according to the 25 Nov 1922 Motion Picture News. The 2 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that production was underway for The Isle of Dead Ships, the first of four pictures by director Maurice Tourneur, under his contract with United Studios president M. C. Levee. Prior to principal photography, Tourneur visited the San Francisco, CA, waterfront in search of antique sailing vessels to be transported to the studio. Exterior shots were filmed around the kelp beds near the coastal city of San Juan Capistrano, CA. On 30 Dec 1922, Exhibitors Herald reported that the cast and crew sailed to San Francisco on the H. F. Alexander, which would appear in the film’s opening sequences. As stated in the 20 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, Tourneur’s thirty-man crew constructed twenty replica nineteenth-century warships for the “Sargasso Sea sequence.” The 3 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Herald noted that the crew also built a submarine set, resembling an actual vessel cut lengthwise. Following the conclusion of principal photography, Tourneur announced the official title as The Isle of Lost Ships, as reported in the 17 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. The Mar 1923 Motion Picture Magazine revealed that actress Anna Q. Nilsson was attacked on set by a large monkey, which nearly clawed the flesh from her shoulders. According to the 10 Mar 1923 Motion Picture News, United Studios opened its doors to the public, allowing visitors to peruse Tourneur’s sets.
       The Isle of Lost ... More Less

Filming was set to begin 20 Nov 1922, according to the 25 Nov 1922 Motion Picture News. The 2 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that production was underway for The Isle of Dead Ships, the first of four pictures by director Maurice Tourneur, under his contract with United Studios president M. C. Levee. Prior to principal photography, Tourneur visited the San Francisco, CA, waterfront in search of antique sailing vessels to be transported to the studio. Exterior shots were filmed around the kelp beds near the coastal city of San Juan Capistrano, CA. On 30 Dec 1922, Exhibitors Herald reported that the cast and crew sailed to San Francisco on the H. F. Alexander, which would appear in the film’s opening sequences. As stated in the 20 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, Tourneur’s thirty-man crew constructed twenty replica nineteenth-century warships for the “Sargasso Sea sequence.” The 3 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Herald noted that the crew also built a submarine set, resembling an actual vessel cut lengthwise. Following the conclusion of principal photography, Tourneur announced the official title as The Isle of Lost Ships, as reported in the 17 Feb 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. The Mar 1923 Motion Picture Magazine revealed that actress Anna Q. Nilsson was attacked on set by a large monkey, which nearly clawed the flesh from her shoulders. According to the 10 Mar 1923 Motion Picture News, United Studios opened its doors to the public, allowing visitors to peruse Tourneur’s sets.
       The Isle of Lost Ships opened 19 Mar 1923 at the Strand Theatre in New York City. Reviews were generally positive, several of which commended Tourneur’s novel, atmospheric rendering of the story.
       Actress Hope Hampton told the Apr 1924 Pictures and Picturegoer that she was initially considered for a starring role in The Isle of Lost Ships while under contract to Associated First National Pictures.
       Another adaptation of Crittenden Marriott's novel was made in 1929 by First National Pictures. Also titled The Island of Lost Ships , that film starred Jason Robards and Virginia Valli (see entry). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
30 Dec 1922
p. 170.
Exhibitors Herald
3 Feb 1923
p. 62.
Exhibitors Herald
3 Mar 1923
p. 40.
Exhibitors Trade Review
2 Dec 1922
p. 13, 17, 27.
Exhibitors Trade Review
6 Jan 1923
p. 297.
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Jan 1923
p. 106.
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Feb 1923
p. 610.
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Apr 1923
p. 1101.
Film Daily
18 Mar 1923
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Apr 1923
p. 14.
Film Daily
30 Apr 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
15 May 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
2 Jun 1923
p. 2.
Motion Picture Magazine
Mar 1923
p. 70.
Motion Picture News
25 Nov 1922
p. 2330.
Motion Picture News
10 Mar 1923
p. 1191, 1197.
Motion Picture News
24 Mar 1923
p. 1386, 1434.
Moving Picture World
6 Jan 1923
p. 71.
Moving Picture World
23 Jun 1923
p. 632.
Pictures and Picturegoer
Apr 1924
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Settings
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Isle of Dead Ships by Crittenden Marriott (Philadelphia, 1909).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Isle of Dead Ships
Release Date:
19 March 1923
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 19 March 1923
Production Date:
20 November 1922--early February 1923
Copyright Claimant:
M. C. Levee
Copyright Date:
13 March 1923
Copyright Number:
LP18766
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,425
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Detective Jackson is taking Frank Howard from South America to New York to face a murder charge when their ship is wrecked. All escape the wreck but Jackson, Howard, and wealthy Dorothy Fairfax. The wreck drifts into the Sargasso Sea, where a fleet of derelicts is inhabited by some 50 people headed by Peter Forbes. To save Dorothy from marriage to Forbes, Frank defeats the ex--sea captain in a fight, then marries her himself, though in name only. Frank calls on his past experience to equip a submarine and make an escape. He wins Dorothy's love and proves his ... +


Detective Jackson is taking Frank Howard from South America to New York to face a murder charge when their ship is wrecked. All escape the wreck but Jackson, Howard, and wealthy Dorothy Fairfax. The wreck drifts into the Sargasso Sea, where a fleet of derelicts is inhabited by some 50 people headed by Peter Forbes. To save Dorothy from marriage to Forbes, Frank defeats the ex--sea captain in a fight, then marries her himself, though in name only. Frank calls on his past experience to equip a submarine and make an escape. He wins Dorothy's love and proves his innocence. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Sea


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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