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HISTORY

The 9 May 1925 Motion Picture News announced that Joseph M. Schenck had purchased the rights to the 1920 play Kiki, written by André Picard and adapted by David Belasco in 1921, as a starring vehicle for his wife, Norma Talmadge. Production was anticipated to begin in late fall 1925.
       Over four months later, the 13 Sep 1925 FD reported that Clarence Brown had been hired to direct the First National Pictures release, which was expected to begin filming in three weeks. However, principal photography began in Dec 1925, according to the 27 Dec 1925 FD, which announced that opening scenes had recently been shot at Joseph M. Schenck’s studios, which were located on the lot of United Studios in Los Angeles, CA.
       According to the 20 Feb 1926 Motion Picture News, filming had completed, and the picture was currently being cut and titled.
       The 11 Apr 1926 FD review deemed Kiki “a frothy bit handsomely mounted,” and asserted that the picture was sure to please Norma Talmadge’s many fans.
       United Artists released a sound adaptation of Kiki in 1931, directed by Sam Taylor and starring Mary Pickford and Reginald Denny (see ... More Less

The 9 May 1925 Motion Picture News announced that Joseph M. Schenck had purchased the rights to the 1920 play Kiki, written by André Picard and adapted by David Belasco in 1921, as a starring vehicle for his wife, Norma Talmadge. Production was anticipated to begin in late fall 1925.
       Over four months later, the 13 Sep 1925 FD reported that Clarence Brown had been hired to direct the First National Pictures release, which was expected to begin filming in three weeks. However, principal photography began in Dec 1925, according to the 27 Dec 1925 FD, which announced that opening scenes had recently been shot at Joseph M. Schenck’s studios, which were located on the lot of United Studios in Los Angeles, CA.
       According to the 20 Feb 1926 Motion Picture News, filming had completed, and the picture was currently being cut and titled.
       The 11 Apr 1926 FD review deemed Kiki “a frothy bit handsomely mounted,” and asserted that the picture was sure to please Norma Talmadge’s many fans.
       United Artists released a sound adaptation of Kiki in 1931, directed by Sam Taylor and starring Mary Pickford and Reginald Denny (see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
13 Sep 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
27 Dec 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
11 Apr 1926
p. 5.
Motion Picture News
9 May 1925
p. 2053.
Motion Picture News
20 Feb 1926
p. 892.
New York Times
6 Apr 1926
p. 26.
Variety
7 Apr 1926
p. 36.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Kiki by André Picard (Paris, 1920) as adapted by David Belasco (New York, 29 Nov 1921).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 April 1926
Production Date:
December 1925--February 1926
Copyright Claimant:
Joseph M. Schenck Productions
Copyright Date:
26 March 1926
Copyright Number:
LP22529
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,279
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Kiki, a Parisian gamine who lives by her wits, graduates from newspaper seller to chorus girl, but is fired from the theater when she quarrels with Paulette, the star and sweetheart of Monsieur Renal, the manager. Renal relents when Kiki begs for help, and takes her to dinner, much to the chagrin of Paulette. The jealous Paulette intrudes upon their dinner, accompanied by Baron Rapp, whom she is secretly wooing. When she tries to humiliate Kiki, Renal takes Kiki to his home where he becomes intrigued with her beauty. Kiki continues to feud with Paulette, who conspires with the baron to lure the girl away from Renal. Following a hair-pulling match with Paulette, Kiki feigns catalepsy. Renal's sympathy turns to love, and when Kiki finally "wakes up," she kisses him, prompting Renal to propose ... +


Kiki, a Parisian gamine who lives by her wits, graduates from newspaper seller to chorus girl, but is fired from the theater when she quarrels with Paulette, the star and sweetheart of Monsieur Renal, the manager. Renal relents when Kiki begs for help, and takes her to dinner, much to the chagrin of Paulette. The jealous Paulette intrudes upon their dinner, accompanied by Baron Rapp, whom she is secretly wooing. When she tries to humiliate Kiki, Renal takes Kiki to his home where he becomes intrigued with her beauty. Kiki continues to feud with Paulette, who conspires with the baron to lure the girl away from Renal. Following a hair-pulling match with Paulette, Kiki feigns catalepsy. Renal's sympathy turns to love, and when Kiki finally "wakes up," she kisses him, prompting Renal to propose marriage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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