Lady Windermere's Fan (1925)

Comedy | 26 December 1925

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HISTORY

The 27 Jun 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Ernst Lubitsch would be directing an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s 1892 play, Lady Windermere’s Fan, for Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 24 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World, the rights to Wilde’s drama “were long sought after unsuccessfully by film producers,” but Wilde’s estate would grant consent to a motion picture version on condition that Ernst Lubitsch was the director.
       The 18 Jul 1925 reported that production would soon begin; however, the start was delayed until Sep 1925. The 13 Aug 1925 FD and the 15 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World stated that Clive Brook had been cast as “Lord Darlington,” but he was later replaced by Ronald Colman.
       According to the 23 Aug 1925 FD, art and technical director Harold Grieve was loaned to Warner Bros. to work on the picture.
       On 3 Oct 1925, Motion Picture News announced that principal photography on Lady Windermere’s Fan began the previous week at the Warner West Coast Studio in Los Angeles, CA.
       The 8 Oct 1925 FD and the 17 Oct 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the production had just completed filming exterior scenes in Toronto, CA, marking the end of principal photography. The 24 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World stated that the production had filmed for several days at the Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto, noting that the location was amongst the farthest away for a Warner production to travel from its studio in CA. The Jan 1926 AmCin reported that Edwin B Du Par ... More Less

The 27 Jun 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Ernst Lubitsch would be directing an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s 1892 play, Lady Windermere’s Fan, for Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 24 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World, the rights to Wilde’s drama “were long sought after unsuccessfully by film producers,” but Wilde’s estate would grant consent to a motion picture version on condition that Ernst Lubitsch was the director.
       The 18 Jul 1925 reported that production would soon begin; however, the start was delayed until Sep 1925. The 13 Aug 1925 FD and the 15 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World stated that Clive Brook had been cast as “Lord Darlington,” but he was later replaced by Ronald Colman.
       According to the 23 Aug 1925 FD, art and technical director Harold Grieve was loaned to Warner Bros. to work on the picture.
       On 3 Oct 1925, Motion Picture News announced that principal photography on Lady Windermere’s Fan began the previous week at the Warner West Coast Studio in Los Angeles, CA.
       The 8 Oct 1925 FD and the 17 Oct 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the production had just completed filming exterior scenes in Toronto, CA, marking the end of principal photography. The 24 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World stated that the production had filmed for several days at the Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto, noting that the location was amongst the farthest away for a Warner production to travel from its studio in CA. The Jan 1926 AmCin reported that Edwin B Du Par accompanied the production as an assistant cameraman.
       The 28 Nov 1925 Moving Picture World announced that Lubitsch was currently editing the film. The release date was anticipated in thirty days.
       A world premiere gala screening was held on 1 Dec 1925 in New York City at the Casa Lopez, according to the 5 Dec 1925 Moving Picture World. The invitation-only event was attended by 200 “prominent” guests, and was preceded by “an elaborate dinner-dance,” held in honor of actress Irene Rich. Vincent Lopez’s orchestra played throughout, and the gala was broadcast over the radio.
       On 6 Dec 1925, the FD review declared Lady Windermere’s Fan “one of the greatest pictures ever made,” noting Lubitsch’s “masterful touch” in translating Wilde’s material from page to screen.
       Twentieth Century-Fox produced another adaptation of Oscar Wilde's play in 1949, under the title The Fan. That version was directed by Otto Preminger and starred Jeanne Crain and George Sanders (see entry). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jan 1926
p. 26.
Exhibitors Trade Review
27 Jun 1925
p. 25.
Exhibitors Trade Review
18 Jul 1925
p. 12.
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Oct 1925
p. 13.
Exhibitors Trade Review
24 Oct 1925
p. 23.
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 Dec 1925
p. 45.
Film Daily
13 Aug 1925
p. 4.
Film Daily
23 Aug 1925
p. 4.
Film Daily
8 Oct 1925
p. 2.
Film Daily
6 Dec 1925
p. 4.
Motion Picture News
3 Oct 1925
p. 1591.
Moving Picture World
15 Aug 1925
p. 761.
Moving Picture World
24 Oct 1925
p. 634.
Moving Picture World
28 Nov 1925
p. 333.
Moving Picture World
5 Dec 1925
p. 443.
Moving Picture World
12 Dec 1925
p. 575.
New York Times
28 Dec 1925
p. 19.
Variety
13 Jan 1926
p. 49.
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 December 1925
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 1 December 1925
Production Date:
late September--early October 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 December 1925
Copyright Number:
LP22085
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,815
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The sensational and indiscreet Mrs. Erlynne returns to London and sends for Lord Windermere. She reveals that she is really his wife's mother, long thought dead by Lady Windermere, and demands payment for her secrecy. She also asks for an invitation to his wife's birthday party. Windermere fails to persuade his wife to send the invitation, but Mrs. Erlynne mistakes the letter of refusal for the invitation. Her arrival at the party arouses the jealousy of Lady Windermere, who goes off to the apartment of Lord Darlington, an admirer. Mrs. Erlynne follows to persuade her daughter to return to her husband before it is too late. Darlington, Windermere, and some other men show up and find Lady Windermere's fan. Mrs. Erlynne comes out, and in front of her admirer, Lord Augustus, claims that she had taken the fan by mistake. Her audacity, however, wins Lord Augustus' ... +


The sensational and indiscreet Mrs. Erlynne returns to London and sends for Lord Windermere. She reveals that she is really his wife's mother, long thought dead by Lady Windermere, and demands payment for her secrecy. She also asks for an invitation to his wife's birthday party. Windermere fails to persuade his wife to send the invitation, but Mrs. Erlynne mistakes the letter of refusal for the invitation. Her arrival at the party arouses the jealousy of Lady Windermere, who goes off to the apartment of Lord Darlington, an admirer. Mrs. Erlynne follows to persuade her daughter to return to her husband before it is too late. Darlington, Windermere, and some other men show up and find Lady Windermere's fan. Mrs. Erlynne comes out, and in front of her admirer, Lord Augustus, claims that she had taken the fan by mistake. Her audacity, however, wins Lord Augustus' heart. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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