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HISTORY

Frank Tuttle was initially set to direct, according to a 3 November 1929 New York Times brief, which named Jeanette MacDonald and Charles Ruggles as the leading lady and man, and Lillian Roth as one of their co-stars. By late December 1929, Leo McCarey was brought on to direct and Ruggles was replaced by James Hall, as indicated by a 29 December 1929 Los Angeles Times item. Nancy Dover and Christian J. Frank were named as cast members in the 18 January 1930 and 9 February 1930 issues of Los Angeles Times.
       An article in the 5 January 1930 New York Times reported that filming was underway at Paramount Publix Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA. For a dance sequence depicting the tango, “ten Hawaiian hula girls and 20 Argentine tango dancers” were hired, in addition to a chorus line of seventy-five women, according to the 26 February 1930 Variety.
       Prior to theatrical release on 16 August 1930, a preview screening was held at the Fox West Lake Theatre in late April or early May 1930, as noted in a 3 May 1930 Hollywood Filmograph review, which praised the picture but suggested that it be “whittled down a bit and furbished in certain spots.” Another early review in the 29 June 1930 Los Angeles Times claimed that the script had been written during—not prior to—production. ...

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Frank Tuttle was initially set to direct, according to a 3 November 1929 New York Times brief, which named Jeanette MacDonald and Charles Ruggles as the leading lady and man, and Lillian Roth as one of their co-stars. By late December 1929, Leo McCarey was brought on to direct and Ruggles was replaced by James Hall, as indicated by a 29 December 1929 Los Angeles Times item. Nancy Dover and Christian J. Frank were named as cast members in the 18 January 1930 and 9 February 1930 issues of Los Angeles Times.
       An article in the 5 January 1930 New York Times reported that filming was underway at Paramount Publix Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA. For a dance sequence depicting the tango, “ten Hawaiian hula girls and 20 Argentine tango dancers” were hired, in addition to a chorus line of seventy-five women, according to the 26 February 1930 Variety.
       Prior to theatrical release on 16 August 1930, a preview screening was held at the Fox West Lake Theatre in late April or early May 1930, as noted in a 3 May 1930 Hollywood Filmograph review, which praised the picture but suggested that it be “whittled down a bit and furbished in certain spots.” Another early review in the 29 June 1930 Los Angeles Times claimed that the script had been written during—not prior to—production.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
14 Jun 1930
p. 109
Exhibitors Herald-World
6 Sep 1930
p. 40
Film Daily
31 Aug 1930
p. 10
Hollywood Filmograph
3 May 1930
p. 29
Los Angeles Times
17 Oct 1929
Section A, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
29 Dec 1929
p. 20
Los Angeles Times
18 Jan 1930
Section A, p. 8
Los Angeles Times
9 Feb 1930
Section B, p.15
Los Angeles Times
6 Apr 1930
Section B, p. 11
Los Angeles Times
29 Jun 1930
Section H, p. 3
Los Angeles Times
8 Sep 1930
Section A, p. 7
New York Times
3 Nov 1929
---
New York Times
5 Jan 1930
---
New York Times
30 Aug 1930
p. 7, 12
Variety
26 Feb 1930
p. 78
Variety
3 Sep 1930
p. 41
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Merrill White
Ed
SOUND
Harry D. Mills
Rec eng
DANCE
Dances & ensembles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Joe Jazz," "Let's Go Native," "It Seems To Be Spring," "I've Got a Yen for You," "My Mad Moment," "Don't I Do?" and "Pampa Rose," words by George Marion, Jr., music by Richard A. Whiting.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 August 1930
Production Date:
began ca. Jan 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
15 August 1930
LP1487
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
6,787
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Joan Wood, a modiste who has staked her fortune on a musical revue to be staged in Buenos Aires, finds herself unable to pay the rent of her apartment and fashion shop. Her sweetheart, Wally Wendell, is threatened with disinheritance unless he marries the daughter of a rival soap firm so as to effect a merger. Thus he joins Joan on a ship bound for South America, traveling as a stoker, along with his friend Basil and McGinnis, a cabdriver involved in a traffic accident. They are shipwrecked during a storm and make their way to a tropical island, rich in pearls and oil and lorded over by Jerry, who has educated the natives. Joan sells Jerry her costumes in exchange for the island, and when Wally's father arrives, he sanctions the marriage as a result of the transaction. Joan sells Mr. Wendell the island for $1 million, but a sudden earthquake causes the island to disappear into the ...

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Joan Wood, a modiste who has staked her fortune on a musical revue to be staged in Buenos Aires, finds herself unable to pay the rent of her apartment and fashion shop. Her sweetheart, Wally Wendell, is threatened with disinheritance unless he marries the daughter of a rival soap firm so as to effect a merger. Thus he joins Joan on a ship bound for South America, traveling as a stoker, along with his friend Basil and McGinnis, a cabdriver involved in a traffic accident. They are shipwrecked during a storm and make their way to a tropical island, rich in pearls and oil and lorded over by Jerry, who has educated the natives. Joan sells Jerry her costumes in exchange for the island, and when Wally's father arrives, he sanctions the marriage as a result of the transaction. Joan sells Mr. Wendell the island for $1 million, but a sudden earthquake causes the island to disappear into the ocean.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.