The Texans (1938)

90 or 92 mins | Western | 15 July 1938

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HISTORY

According to Paramount story files at the AMPAS library, the film's working title was Marching Herds . According to the pressbook, the town of Indianola was reconstructed on the Paramount set. Paramount filmed some scenes at the La Mota Ranch, a 35,000-acre spread between San Antonio and Laredo, TX. The stampede scene used 25,000 Longhorn steer. Some props were from the Pony Express Museum in Arcadia, CA. In 1924, Paramount released North of 36 , based on the same source, directed by Irvin Willat, and starring Jack Holt, Ernest Torrence and Lois Wilson (see ... More Less

According to Paramount story files at the AMPAS library, the film's working title was Marching Herds . According to the pressbook, the town of Indianola was reconstructed on the Paramount set. Paramount filmed some scenes at the La Mota Ranch, a 35,000-acre spread between San Antonio and Laredo, TX. The stampede scene used 25,000 Longhorn steer. Some props were from the Pony Express Museum in Arcadia, CA. In 1924, Paramount released North of 36 , based on the same source, directed by Irvin Willat, and starring Jack Holt, Ernest Torrence and Lois Wilson (see above). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jul 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Jul 38
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 38
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 38
pp. 10-11.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
15 Jul 38
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Apr 38
p. 27.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Jul 38
p. 39.
New York Times
28 Jul 38
p. 23.
Variety
3 Aug 38
p. 15.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Jack Moore
Edward Brady
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Lucien Hubbard Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel North of 36 by Emerson Hough (New York, 1923).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Silver on the Sage," words and music by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger
"I'll Come to the Wedding," words and music by Frank Loesser.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Marching Herds
Release Date:
15 July 1938
Production Date:
mid February--late April 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 August 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8203
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 92
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4258
SYNOPSIS

In Texas after the Civil War, Ivy Preston delivers a shipment of guns to her fiancé, Alan Sanford, who then leaves to raise an army with Mexican Emperor Maximilian and resume the fight against the Yankees. When Kirk Jordan, a Southerner who believes in the peaceful co-existence of the North and South, rescues Ivy from arrest by Major Isaiah Middlebrack, the entire town joins in the fight. Back at her poverty-stricken ranch, Ivy, her "Granna" and foreman Chuckawalla are confronted again by Middlebrack, who has brought with him the cavalry, led by Lieutenant David Nichols. Middlebrack slyly agrees not to arrest Ivy. Instead, he intends to tax all of her 10,000 head of cattle, and accepts land scrip for their ranch as payment. Determined to outsmart the major, Granna gets Middlebrack drunk, while Ivy mobilizes her ranch hands with the help of Kirk and his fur-trapping sidekick, Cal Tuttle. Later that night, Ivy, Kirk and Cal head the herd toward the Rio Grande River. After Granna and Chuckawalla catch up, they evade the cavalry by crossing the river. At Kirk's suggestion, a reluctant Ivy agrees to herd the cattle on a dangerous trek up to Abilene, Kansas, where she will be able to sell the cattle at a high price due to the introduction of the railroad. Middlebrack goes to the state capital and receives the authority to arrest Ivy and her troupe for tax evasion and treason, and the cavalry follows in pursuit. After the herd endures a blizzard and Granna fights illness, Alan arrives exhausted at the campsite and informs them that his plans to build a ... +


In Texas after the Civil War, Ivy Preston delivers a shipment of guns to her fiancé, Alan Sanford, who then leaves to raise an army with Mexican Emperor Maximilian and resume the fight against the Yankees. When Kirk Jordan, a Southerner who believes in the peaceful co-existence of the North and South, rescues Ivy from arrest by Major Isaiah Middlebrack, the entire town joins in the fight. Back at her poverty-stricken ranch, Ivy, her "Granna" and foreman Chuckawalla are confronted again by Middlebrack, who has brought with him the cavalry, led by Lieutenant David Nichols. Middlebrack slyly agrees not to arrest Ivy. Instead, he intends to tax all of her 10,000 head of cattle, and accepts land scrip for their ranch as payment. Determined to outsmart the major, Granna gets Middlebrack drunk, while Ivy mobilizes her ranch hands with the help of Kirk and his fur-trapping sidekick, Cal Tuttle. Later that night, Ivy, Kirk and Cal head the herd toward the Rio Grande River. After Granna and Chuckawalla catch up, they evade the cavalry by crossing the river. At Kirk's suggestion, a reluctant Ivy agrees to herd the cattle on a dangerous trek up to Abilene, Kansas, where she will be able to sell the cattle at a high price due to the introduction of the railroad. Middlebrack goes to the state capital and receives the authority to arrest Ivy and her troupe for tax evasion and treason, and the cavalry follows in pursuit. After the herd endures a blizzard and Granna fights illness, Alan arrives exhausted at the campsite and informs them that his plans to build a rebel army were destroyed when the emperor was dethroned and executed. When Ivy and Alan announce their engagement, there is a celebration, but Kirk is disappointed. Confronted by Comanches, who ask for one steer in exchange for peaceable passage through their land, Alan refuses their request despite Kirk's advice. After a dust storm, the herd is attacked by Comanches, who retreat when the cavalry approaches. Middlebrack arrests everyone and takes command of the wagon train, but Kirk and Cal manage to slip away unnoticed. They follow the herd for three days, but ride to the rescue when Comanches set the grasses on fire around the herd. Cal kills Middlebrack, and after the dust is settled, Lieutenant Nichols honors the death of a ranch hand and escorts the herd to the Kansas border. On arrival at Abilene, Alan disappears and the Preston herd saves the town from losing the railroad's business. Kirk confesses his love to Ivy and says goodbye. When Ivy discovers Alan is helping to form the Ku Klux Klan, she realizes the error of his ways and runs after Kirk, catching up with him in time to join Cal and him on a beaver-trapping trip. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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