The Life of the Party (1930)

78 mins | Musical comedy | 25 October 1930

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
9 Nov 1930
---
New York Times
10 Nov 1930
p. 16
Variety
12 Nov 1930
p. 21
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Melville Crossman
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Can It Be Possible?" words and music by Sidney Mitchell, Archie Gottler and Joseph Meyer; "The Honeymoon Parade," words by Sidney Mitchell, Archie Gottler and Joseph Meyer, music by Gus Edwards.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 October 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
2 October 1930
LP1602
Physical Properties:
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
7,152
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Flo and Dot, song pluggers and clerks in a New York music shop, are exact opposites: the latter, beautiful and reserved, and the former, a typical gold digger. Foster, their employer, blames them for poor business and Le Maire, an excitable Frenchman courting their favor, wrecks the shop when asked to leave. Consequently, the girls are fired and take work in Le Maire's modiste shop. After being offered finery for a party, the girls take the clothes and depart for Havana--Dot having been sold on professional gold digging. There, Flo learns that Smith, a soft drink millionaire, is staying in their hotel but mistakes a Colonel Joy as their game; but as the wedding is set for Dot, she learns that Jerry Smith, with whom she is in love, is the actual millionaire. Le Maire arrives and exposes their plotting, but Jerry pays for their trouble and wins Dot as his ...

More Less

Flo and Dot, song pluggers and clerks in a New York music shop, are exact opposites: the latter, beautiful and reserved, and the former, a typical gold digger. Foster, their employer, blames them for poor business and Le Maire, an excitable Frenchman courting their favor, wrecks the shop when asked to leave. Consequently, the girls are fired and take work in Le Maire's modiste shop. After being offered finery for a party, the girls take the clothes and depart for Havana--Dot having been sold on professional gold digging. There, Flo learns that Smith, a soft drink millionaire, is staying in their hotel but mistakes a Colonel Joy as their game; but as the wedding is set for Dot, she learns that Jerry Smith, with whom she is in love, is the actual millionaire. Le Maire arrives and exposes their plotting, but Jerry pays for their trouble and wins Dot as his wife.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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