Love Among the Millionaires (1930)

70 mins | Romance, Musical | 19 July 1930

Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
13 Jul 1930
p. 10
Life
25 Jul 1930
p. 19
New York Times
5 Jul 1930
p. 17
New Yorker
12 Jul 1930
p. 53
Variety
9 Jul 1930
p. 19
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Allen Siegler
Dir of photog
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Believe It or Not, I've Found My Man," "That's Worth While Waiting For," "Love Among the Millionaires," "Rarin' To Go" and "Don't Be a Meanie," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by Abel Baer.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 July 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 5 Jul 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
18 July 1930
LP1428
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,910
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Near a railroad junction, Pepper and her sister, Penelope, work in their father's cafe. Boots McGee, a railroad detective, and Clicker Watson, a telegraph operator, are bitter rivals for Pepper's love; however, she falls in love with Jerry Hamilton, son of the railroad president masquerading as a brakeman. Jordan, a junior executive, informs Mr. Hamilton, who wires his son to return home. Jerry does so, bringing his sweetheart. At the Hamilton mansion, Pepper finds that although his sister, Barbara, is sympathetic, Hamilton is bitterly opposed to the match, and fearful of jeopardizing the father's happiness, she agrees with Hamilton that she should disillusion the boy. Meanwhile, Pepper's father along with her former suitors arrive in time for a party. Pepper pretends drunkenness and breaks the engagement, but Mr. Whipple and Hamilton strike up a friendship, and Penelope, discovering the plot, announces that Pepper still loves ...

More Less

Near a railroad junction, Pepper and her sister, Penelope, work in their father's cafe. Boots McGee, a railroad detective, and Clicker Watson, a telegraph operator, are bitter rivals for Pepper's love; however, she falls in love with Jerry Hamilton, son of the railroad president masquerading as a brakeman. Jordan, a junior executive, informs Mr. Hamilton, who wires his son to return home. Jerry does so, bringing his sweetheart. At the Hamilton mansion, Pepper finds that although his sister, Barbara, is sympathetic, Hamilton is bitterly opposed to the match, and fearful of jeopardizing the father's happiness, she agrees with Hamilton that she should disillusion the boy. Meanwhile, Pepper's father along with her former suitors arrive in time for a party. Pepper pretends drunkenness and breaks the engagement, but Mr. Whipple and Hamilton strike up a friendship, and Penelope, discovering the plot, announces that Pepper still loves Jerry.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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