The Love Trap (1929)

63 mins | Romantic comedy | 4 August 1929

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HISTORY

Some sources incorrectly identify the name of the family as "Cadwallader" and refer to Laura La Plante's character as "Laura." A silent version of the film was also released, at a length of 6,349 feet. The partial-sound version, which was the print viewed, contained no dialogue until approximately 45 min. into the film. At that point, Neil Hamilton as "Paul Harrington" says "Hello, Foster" as he enters his mother's house. Dialogue continues throughout the remainder of the ... More Less

Some sources incorrectly identify the name of the family as "Cadwallader" and refer to Laura La Plante's character as "Laura." A silent version of the film was also released, at a length of 6,349 feet. The partial-sound version, which was the print viewed, contained no dialogue until approximately 45 min. into the film. At that point, Neil Hamilton as "Paul Harrington" says "Hello, Foster" as he enters his mother's house. Dialogue continues throughout the remainder of the film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
1 Sep 1929.
---
Variety
4 Sep 1929
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A William Wyler Production
Universal-Jewel
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
Film ed
COSTUMES
SOUND
Synchronization & Score
Rec supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 August 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1929
Copyright Number:
LP566
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq and sd eff by Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63
Length(in feet):
6,233
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After chorus girl Evelyn Todd is fired from a Broadway show and faces eviction from her apartment, her friend Bunny convinces her to attend a party thrown by playboy Guy Emory, whom Bunny says pays girls $50 “just to look pretty.” Evelyn enjoys the ritzy party until Guy spills a drink on her dress, then tries to seduce her when she goes into a bedroom to take the dress off to dry. As she struggles with Guy, one of the party guests, Judge Harrington, sees them and assumes the worst. Because Evelyn refuses to submit to Guy, he throws her dress out the window, forcing her to flee the party in her slip and coat. Outside her apartment building, Evelyn starts to cry when she sees that her landlady has moved all of her things onto the sidewalk. As a rainstorm starts and cars splash mud on her, the wealthy Paul Harrington sees her and stops his taxi. He offers to share his taxi until the rain stops, then hires three more taxis to carry her furniture. After driving all night and winding up in the country, the bill is $100 more than Paul has with him, so the drivers remove Evelyn's furniture. When Paul unsuccessfully tries to fight the drivers, Evelyn comforts him as the taxis abandon them. One week later, Paul and Evelyn, who are now married, are living happily in his sumptuous New York apartment and are waiting to greet Paul’s mother and sister Iris, who have just returned from Europe. Mrs. Harrington, who is accompanied by her brother-in-law, Judge Harrington, is unnerved to discover that Evelyn had ... +


After chorus girl Evelyn Todd is fired from a Broadway show and faces eviction from her apartment, her friend Bunny convinces her to attend a party thrown by playboy Guy Emory, whom Bunny says pays girls $50 “just to look pretty.” Evelyn enjoys the ritzy party until Guy spills a drink on her dress, then tries to seduce her when she goes into a bedroom to take the dress off to dry. As she struggles with Guy, one of the party guests, Judge Harrington, sees them and assumes the worst. Because Evelyn refuses to submit to Guy, he throws her dress out the window, forcing her to flee the party in her slip and coat. Outside her apartment building, Evelyn starts to cry when she sees that her landlady has moved all of her things onto the sidewalk. As a rainstorm starts and cars splash mud on her, the wealthy Paul Harrington sees her and stops his taxi. He offers to share his taxi until the rain stops, then hires three more taxis to carry her furniture. After driving all night and winding up in the country, the bill is $100 more than Paul has with him, so the drivers remove Evelyn's furniture. When Paul unsuccessfully tries to fight the drivers, Evelyn comforts him as the taxis abandon them. One week later, Paul and Evelyn, who are now married, are living happily in his sumptuous New York apartment and are waiting to greet Paul’s mother and sister Iris, who have just returned from Europe. Mrs. Harrington, who is accompanied by her brother-in-law, Judge Harrington, is unnerved to discover that Evelyn had been a chorus girl but agrees to return for dinner the next night. The judge recognizes Evelyn from Guy’s party but says nothing. The next night, when his family is long overdue, Paul calls his mother, whose butler, Foster, says she is too ill to come to dinner. Paul and Evelyn then quarrel because she is certain it is an excuse while he is concerned for his mother’s health. Paul then leaves for his mother’s house. When Bunny calls Evelyn a few minutes later, she promises to come over to cheer her up, but does not tell her that she is bringing along a crowd from one of Guy’s party’s. Meanwhile, when Paul arrives at his mother’s house he is shocked and angry to find that she is fine. Judge Harrington then tells Paul that Evelyn is a party girl and no good. Paul says that he will prove him wrong and insists that the judge and his mother come home with him. When they arrive at the apartment, they find a raucous party in progress, which seems to confirm the judge’s accusations. Paul then takes his mother home, but the judge, using the excuse of urgent business, returns to the apartment. He finds Evelyn alone in her bedroom and tries to convince her to take a $50,000 check to divorce Paul. Evelyn starts to cry and begs him not to misjudge her, but he accuses her of putting on an act. His words give Evelyn the idea to pretend to be the type of woman he thinks she is. After locking the bedroom door, she tosses his coat out the window, lights some cigarettes, changes into evening pajamas and rumbles up the bed and his hair. When the mortified judge hears Paul returning, he begs her to let him go, but is forced to take refuge on the balcony. Evelyn then calls out “oh, darling, my husband is home,” just before unlocking the bedroom door. Paul then comes in and angrily searches for the other man. When he goes to the balcony, he is shocked to find his embarrassed uncle, who feebly tries to explain himself. Evelyn makes matters worse when she says that she only married Paul to be near the judge. Just then, Paul finds the $50,000 check on the floor. After deducing what must have happened, Paul rushes the judge out the door then takes Evelyn in his arms, telling her he knows she was only acting and he loves her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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